UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy (GRAD)

The UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy offers graduate programs leading to the master of science in pharmaceutical sciences with a specialization in health-system pharmacy administration and to the doctor of philosophy in pharmaceutical sciences with concentrations in one of four research areas: chemical biology and medicinal chemistry; pharmacoengineering and molecular pharmaceutics; pharmacotherapy and experimental therapeutics; or pharmaceutical outcomes and policy. Students from the master of science in pharmaceutical sciences with a specialization in health-system pharmacy administration are competitive for careers in administrative positions in hospital pharmacies and other health systems. Students in from the Ph.D. program are competitive for careers in academia, pharmaceutical companies, biotech companies, government agencies such as the FDA, CDC, and NIH, nonprofit research organizations, and a variety of alternative careers including patent law, venture capital, and entrepreneurialism.      

Instruction emphasizes contemporary research methods, study design, and results and is delivered in the form of small group lectures/discussions, group activities and recitations, and seminars combined with intensive laboratory-based research. The excellent rapport that exists between schools, departments, institutes, and centers within the University facilitates interdisciplinary collaborative research by graduate students and faculty. The graduate degree programs also benefit from faculty affiliations with GlaxoSmithKline, Inc., the Research Triangle Institute, the Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Duke University, the Wake Forest University School of Medicine, and many other organizations in the Research Triangle Park area. The UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy is housed in Beard Hall, Kerr Hall, Marsico Hall, and the Genetic Medicine Building, which are located on the health sciences campus together with the Adams Schools of Dentistry, the School of Medicine, the School of Nursing and the Gillings School of Global Public Health. The Health Sciences Library has an outstanding collection of books and journals as well as computer and support services. Library and laboratory resources residing in other University departments are also available for use by students and faculty.

Admission to the Ph.D. Program

Applicants who have completed a standard collegiate curriculum in pharmacy, chemistry, biochemistry, biology, engineering, public health, or in an allied field in the University, or in other universities or colleges having curricula acceptable to UNC–Chapel Hill's Graduate School, are eligible for admission to the graduate program in pharmaceutical sciences. Applicants must submit letters of recommendation, official transcripts, and a statement of personal goals as they relate to graduate study at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. The GRE is not required.

The Graduate School online application is the standard means of applying for admission. Inquiries concerning admission to programs in the pharmaceutical sciences may be directed to the Office of Student Affairs at ocsa@unc.edu.

All applications to the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy’s Ph.D. in pharmaceutical sciences program must be submitted through the UNC Graduate School.

Deadlines

Applications typically open in early August and review of applications begins December 1. The official deadlines can be found on the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy’s website.

Application Requirements

  • Graduate School application
  • Nonrefundable $95.00 application fee. Fee scholarships are available. Please contact Will Taylor at ocsa@unc.edu for more information.
  • Three current letters of recommendation. When filling out the Graduate School application, applicants will be asked to submit the email addresses of the recommenders, who will then receive an email with information for logging into the system to submit their letters.
  • Transcripts
  • Statement of purpose. (See below.)
  • A current email address. (The Graduate School only uses email to communicate with applicants.)

Notes 

  • For Question 2 on the application, make sure you scroll down the list until you see “School of Pharmacy.” In the dropdown menu for School of Pharmacy, please select Pharmaceutical Sciences.
  • Applicants must indicate only one choice on their application for their division of interest or specialization. Only the first choice of sub plan (i.e., area of interest or specialization) will be considered on their application. Applicants should also describe this choice in their statement of purpose.
  • Being admitted to The Graduate School does not imply that you will receive financial assistance of any kind. The awarding of financial assistance is a separate decision.

Questions

Consult the Graduate School’s application instructions or contact gradinfo@unc.edu.

Statement of Purpose

To assist in the evaluation of your application, please provide a concise personal statement including the following information.

  • Why do you wish to pursue graduate study in pharmaceutical sciences?
  • Why do you wish to engage in graduate study at this institution?
  • What are your reasons for selecting your first choice of sub plan (i.e., area of interest or specialization)?
  • What do you offer that will enrich our graduate program? Please include factors such as:
    • Work, teaching, or other life experiences
    • Meaningful events that have influenced your life and career choices
    • Communication abilities
    • Problem-solving skills
    • Are you a leader, follower, or team player?
    • History of overcoming challenges or disadvantages
    • Cultural diversity (this may include ethnic background, race, and other attributes that define your cultural background)
  • If possible, please identify the specific research areas in which you plan to focus your graduate studies. Is there a particular faculty member with whom you would like to work?

Admission to the M.S. Program

Applicants to the master's program must meet both of the following requirements:

  1. Be a licensed pharmacist in the U.S. 
  2. Hold a Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) or the equivalent

Everything detailed below must be completed prior to the deadline for your application to be considered.

Interested applicants will need to apply to the University of North Carolina Graduate School for their didactic component. The applicant will also need to complete separate applications for each residency program to which they wish to apply — UNC Hospitals, Duke University Health System, Wake Forest Baptist Hospital, Mission Health in Asheville, or Moses Cone in Greensboro. Applicants need only to apply to their residency programs of interest.

Individual interview days will be scheduled at times convenient for applicants and institutions. Each applicant and program will communicate to identify the ideal time to conduct the interview. Our hope is to have all of the interviews for an applicant in one consecutive period.

Each program will participate in the match, but each one has a different match number. If you have not done so already, please make sure to register for the National Matching Service offered through ASHP. Currently there are four positions available at UNC, one at Duke, two at Wake Forest, one at Mission Health, and one at Moses Cone, for a total of nine per cohort.

Application Procedures

  • Complete a Graduate School application for admission (see link below)
  • Create an online account
  • Fill out the application information as follows:
    • Level of Study: Graduate
    • Type of Applicant: New degree-seeking applicant
    • Major: Pharmaceutical Sciences
    • Degree: Master of Science
    • Area of Interest or Specialization: Practice Advancement and Clinical Education
  • Select the term of entry
  • Fill out the applicant information
  • Fill out educational background
  • Upload your unofficial transcripts — undergraduate and graduate
  • Upload a statement of purpose
  • GREs are not required
  • Upload a copy of your CV/resume
  • Submit the application and pay the non-refundable $85 application fee
  • Provide three letters of recommendation (may be identical to those provided for the residency program application) using the recommendations link on the online application under “Important Links”
  • Have your graduate and undergraduate school submit an official academic transcript for each school attended. The graduate school will request official transcripts after acceptance into the program only.

Graduate Assistantships and Fellowships in the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy

Research assistantships in the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy provide a competitive stipend, health insurance, tuition, and fees for 12 months' service. All awards are made on a competitive basis with consideration given to the applicant's academic record and research experience. Information concerning these assistantships, fellowships, and traineeships may be obtained by writing directly to the Office of Research and Graduate Education at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy.

Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry

Chemical biology and medicinal chemistry are multidisciplinary fields that integrate organic chemistry, biochemistry, molecular biology, structural biology, pharmacology, and physiology. The research in the division applies and extends the basic concepts of chemistry, biochemistry, and pharmacology to the investigation of biomedical problems. General areas of study include structure-activity relationships, drug-receptor interactions, synthetic drug design, and target discovery and validation. Specific focus areas include cancer chemotherapy, computer-aided drug design, enzymology, glycobiology, molecular modeling, natural products, neurochemistry, parasitology, and structural biology.

Pharmacoengineering and Molecular Pharmaceutics

Pharmacoengineering and molecular pharmaceutics represents interdisciplinary specialties encompassing a range of scientific endeavors, including the design, fabrication, evaluation, use of, and delivery strategies for dosage forms; elucidation of the behavior of pharmacologic agents in biologic systems; determination of the ability of pharmacologic agents to reach the relevant site of biologic effect; and determination of the time course of biologic activity.

These areas of specialization represent critical steps in the development of new therapeutic agents, the evaluation of new and existing drugs, and the optimal clinical use of pharmacologic agents.

Students in the Division of Pharmacoengineering and Molecular Pharmaceutics are required to participate in a common core of entry-level graduate courses. This core provides a broad perspective of the pharmaceutical sciences as well as an appreciation for how different subdisciplines interact. Many dissertation projects are collaborative in nature and rely upon interactions with faculty in other divisions of the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, as well as with colleagues in the UNC School of Medicine, the Department of Chemistry, or at pharmaceutical companies or institutions located in the Research Triangle Park area.

Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy

The Division of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy offers a Ph.D. program in pharmaceutical sciences emphasizing an interdisciplinary approach to addressing issues relevant to medication use at the patient, provider, community, and societal levels. Faculty research interests and course offerings reflect this interdisciplinary orientation. Students develop knowledge and skills that enable them to conduct high quality research directed at improving the use and cost effectiveness of medications, technology, and services. Education and research in the division draws heavily upon expertise in numerous fields such as health services research, health policy, health communication, health behavior and behavior change, epidemiology, and psychometrics. Areas of faculty and student research include communication and decision making, comparative effectiveness of medications and pharmacy practice models, medication adherence and self-management, health disparities, health literacy, patient reported outcomes assessment, pharmaceutical policy analysis, and policy and ethical issues related to pharmacogenomics.

Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics

The Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics offers a Ph.D. program in the pharmaceutical sciences with a focus on translational research that integrates biomedical and pharmaceutical sciences in both laboratory-based models and in humans. The goal of the program is to develop scientists who are prepared to generate and disseminate new knowledge in pharmacotherapy and accelerate its application to improve patient care. Graduate students engage in clinical experiences throughout the program that are designed to complement each student's research interests while also facilitating their development as translational scientists. Areas of graduate coursework and research include drug metabolism and transport, pharmacokinetics/pharmaco-dynamics/pharmacometrics, pharmacogenomics, clinical research, drug development, experimental therapeutics, and mechanisms of drug toxicity. Therapeutic and research areas of particular strength include cardiovascular disease, infectious disease/HIV, oncology/hematology, hepatology/gastroenterology/transplant, and pulmonary disease.

Master of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences

The Eshelman School of Pharmacy offers a master of science in pharmaceutical sciences with a specialization in health-systems pharmacy.

The M.S. program prepares future health care leaders to manage highly complex and multifaceted pharmacy enterprise operations. To accomplish this goal, the program provides students with the knowledge, skills, and experience necessary to assume a variety of roles and responsibilities. Graduates serve as vibrant, committed professionals with a focus on improving patients' health, health care delivery, and the profession of pharmacy. This occurs through both didactic education and experiential opportunities in class and in the workplace.

The residential M.S. program is designed for full-time students with a Pharm.D. degree who are seeking residency training experience. 

The fully online M.S. program is designed for working professionals with a pharmacy degree who want to secure their degree while working.

Distinguished Professors

Kristy Ainslie, Pharmacoengineering and Molecular Pharmaceutics
Jeffrey Aube, Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry
Kim Brouwer, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics
Stefanie Ferreri, Practice Advancement
Stephen Frye, Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry
Leaf Huang, Pharmacoengineering and Molecular Pharmaceutics
Michael Jay, emeritus, Pharmacoengineering and Molecular Pharmaceutics
Alexander Kabanov, Pharmacoengineering and Molecular Pharmaceutics
David Lawrence, Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry
Jian Liu, Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry
Denise Rhoney-Metzger, Practice Advancement
Betsy Sleath, Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy
Alexander Tropsha, Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry

Professors of the Practice

John Bamforth, Eshelman Institute for Innovation
Jon Easter, Practice Advancement
Anthony Hickey, UNC Catalyst for Rare Disease
Stephanie Kiser, Practice Advancement

Professors

Jennifer Elston-Lafata, Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy
Timothy Ives, Practice Advancement
Samuel Lai, Pharmacoengineering and Molecular Pharmaceutics
Andrew Lee, Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry
Craig Lee, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics
Mary McClurg, Practice Advancement
James H. Patterson, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics
Paul Watkins, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics

Associate Professors

Albert Bowers, Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry
Delesha Carpenter, Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy
Gang Fang, Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy
Daniel Gonzalez, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics
Nathaniel Hathaway, Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry
Erin Heinzen Cox, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics
Shawn Hingtgen, Pharmacoengineering and Molecular Pharmaceutics
Federico Innocenti, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics
Michael Jarstfer, Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry
Rihe Liu, Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry
Jacqueline McLaughlin, Practice Advancement
Juliane Nguyen, Pharmacoengineering and Molecular Pharmaceutics
Sachiko Ozawa, Practice Advancement
Robert Shrewsbury, Practice Advancement
Scott Singleton, Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry
Philip Smith, Pharmacoengineering and Molecular Pharmaceutics
Kathleen Thomas, Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy
Carolyn Thorpe, Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy
Joshua Thorpe, Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy
Dennis Williams, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics
Timothy Wiltshire, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics
William Zamboni, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics
Qisheng Zhang, Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry

Assistant Professors

Aaron Anselmo, Pharmacoengineering and Molecular Pharmaceutics
Yanguang Cao, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics
Daniel Crona, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics
Julie Dumond, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics
Klarissa Jackson, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics
Lindsey James, Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry
Alan Kinlaw, Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy
Robert McGinty, Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry
Gauri Rao, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics
Megan Roberts, Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy
Amanda Seyerle, Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy
Casey Tak, Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy

Research Professors

Kenneth Pearce Jr., Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry
Xiaodong Wang, Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry
Timothy Willson, Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry

Research Associate Professors

Eric Bachelder, Pharmacoengineering and Molecular Pharmaceutics
Elena Batrakova, Pharmacoengineering and Molecular Pharmaceutics
David Drewry, Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry 
Robert Hubal, Practice Advancement
Juan Li, Pharmacoengineering and Molecular Pharmaceutics
Ievgen Muratov, Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry
Samantha Pattenden, Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry
Elias Rosen, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics
Marina Sokolsky-Papkov, Pharmacoengineering and Molecular Pharmaceutics
Yongmei Xu, Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry

Research Assistant Professors

Katelyn Arnold, Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry
Alison Axtman, Structural Genomics Consortium 
Jacqueline Bezencon, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics
Carrie Blanchard, Center for Medication Optimization (CMO)
Rachel Church, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics
Mackenzie Cottrell, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics
Anita Crescenzi, Practice Advancement
Scott Davis, Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy
Yury Desyaterik, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics
Kevin Frankowski, Center for Integrative Chemical Biology and Drug Discovery (CICBDD)
Dong Fu, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics
Masuo Goto, Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry
Lauren Haar, Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry
Jine Li, Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry
Melanie Livet, Center for Medication Optimization (CMO)
Matthew Loop, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics
Andrew Lucas, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics
Merrie Mosedale, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics
Jillian Perry, Center for Nanotechnology in Drug Discovery (CNDD)
Paul Sapienza, Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry
Junjiang Sun, Pharmacoengineering and Molecular Pharmaceutics
Benjamin Urick, Center for Medication Optimization (CMO)
Qunzhao Wang, Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry
Bin Xiao, Pharmacoengineering and Molecular Pharmaceutics

Clinical Professors

Robert Dupuis, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics
Adam Persky, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics
Jo Ellen Rodgers, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics
John Greene Shepherd, Practice Advancement

Clinical Associate Professors

Amanda H. Corbett, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics
Wendy Cox, Practice Advancement
Stephen Eckel, Practice Advancement
Macary Marciniak, Practice Advancement
Nicole Pinelli Reitter, Practice Advancement
Philip Rodgers, Practice Advancement
Mollie Scott, Practice Advancement
Deborah Sturpe, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics

Clinical Assistant Professors

Heidi Anksorus, Practice Advancement
Amber Frick, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics
Kathryn Fuller, Practice Advancement
Jessica Greene, Pharmacoengineering and Molecular Pharmaceutics
Suzanne Harris, Practice Advancement
Kathryn Morbitzer, Practice Advancement
Benyam Muluneh, Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics
Kimberly Sanders, Practice Advancement
Amanda Savage, Practice Advancement
David Steeb, Practice Advancement
Carla White, Practice Advancement
Charlene Williams, Practice Advancement
Jacqueline Zeeman, Practice Advancement

Subjects in this school include: Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry (CBMC)Pharmacoengineering and Molecular Pharmaceutics (DPMP), Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics (DPET), Practice Advancement and Clinical Education (PACE), Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy (DPOP), and Pharmaceutical Sciences (PHRS).

Note that the courses listed below are not listed in the order and number of times that they must be completed. See the program's website for more detailed information about the sequence of courses and credit hour totals. The program's website also provides information about concentrations.

Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry

CBMC 807Foundations of Chemical Biology I: Organic and Medicinal Chemistry3
CBMC 805Molecular Modeling3
Graduate level Biology course
PHRS 801Foundations for Cross-Disciplinary Training in the Pharmaceutical Sciences1-3
CHEM 701Introduction to Laboratory Safety1
PHRS 899Seminar in Pharmaceutical Sciences1
PHRS 991Research in Pharmaceutical Sciences1-9
CBMC 804ABiochemical Foundations of Chemical Biology3
CBMC 804BBiochemical Foundations of Chemical Biology Journal Club1
PHRS 994Doctoral Research and Dissertation3

Pharmacoengineering and Molecular Pharmaceutics

PHRS 801Foundations for Cross-Disciplinary Training in the Pharmaceutical Sciences1-3
DPMP 738Nanomedicine3
DPMP 862Advanced Physical Pharmacy1.5
DPMP 863Advanced Pharmaceutics II1.5
DPMP 864Advances in Drug Delivery3
DPET 853PK Module 1: Pharmacokinetic Concepts and Applications1.75
DPMP 8151.5
PHRS 899Seminar in Pharmaceutical Sciences1
PHRS 991Research in Pharmaceutical Sciences1-9
PHRS 994Doctoral Research and Dissertation3

 Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics

Clinician Track 

DPET 873Precision Therapeutics Through Genomics3
DPET 833Experimental Design Considerations in Clinical Research2
DPET 853PK Module 1: Pharmacokinetic Concepts and Applications1.75
DPET 854PK: Module 2: Pharmacodynamic Concepts and Applications1.25
DPET 857PK Module 3: Population PK/PD Analysis2
DPET 858PK Module 4: Advanced PK/PD Modeling2
DPET 8412
PHRS 801Foundations for Cross-Disciplinary Training in the Pharmaceutical Sciences1-3
PHRS 899Seminar in Pharmaceutical Sciences1
PHRS 991Research in Pharmaceutical Sciences1-9
PHRS 994Doctoral Research and Dissertation3
DPMP 8151.5
Approved elective courses (6)

Non-Clinician Track

DPET 833Experimental Design Considerations in Clinical Research2
DPET 853PK Module 1: Pharmacokinetic Concepts and Applications1.75
DPET 854PK: Module 2: Pharmacodynamic Concepts and Applications1.25
DPET 873Precision Therapeutics Through Genomics3
DPET 8412
DPET 8564
DPET 857PK Module 3: Population PK/PD Analysis2
DPMP 8151.5
PHRS 899Seminar in Pharmaceutical Sciences1
PHRS 991Research in Pharmaceutical Sciences1-9
PHRS 994Doctoral Research and Dissertation3

Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy

DPOP 803Social and Behavioral Aspects of Pharmaceutical Use3
DPOP 806Pharmaceutical Policy3
DPOP 872Proposal Writing in DPOP3
DPOP 870Pharmaceutical Outcomes Research3
EPID 710Fundamentals of Epidemiology3
EPID 705Introduction to Deductive and Probability Logic in Epidemiology2
EPID 715Theory and Quantitative Methods in Epidemiology4
EPID 716Epidemiologic Data Analysis3
EPID 765Methods and Issues in Pharmacoepidemiology3
PHRS 815Foundations in Implementation Science: Examples in Precision Health and Society1.5
PHRS 899Seminar in Pharmaceutical Sciences1
PHRS 991Research in Pharmaceutical Sciences1-9
PHRS 994Doctoral Research and Dissertation3

Practice Advancement and Clinical Education (Master's Program)

PACE 815Evaluation Research and Project Design3
PACE 820Health-System Pharmacy Leadership3
PACE 825Foundational Practices of a Successful Health-System Department of Pharmacy4
PACE 832Financial Management of Health-system Pharmacy3
PACE 833Overview of Health Systems3
PACE 860Advanced Hospital Pharmacy Operations3
PHRS 899Seminar in Pharmaceutical Sciences1
PHRS 991Research in Pharmaceutical Sciences1-9
PHRS 992Master's (Non-Thesis)3

UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy

Visit Program Website

Assistant Dean for Graduate Studies

Michael Jarstfer

jarstfer@unc.edu