Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (GRAD)

The M.A. in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies is a two-year, interdisciplinary humanities degree that prepares students to engage with the social, environmental, and political challenges facing countries in Asia and the Middle East, and their transnational communities. Students can choose between two tracks: the interdisciplinary track and the Chinese track. This degree will provide students with deep cultural knowledge of Asia and the Middle East while training them in the intellectual flexibility necessary to grasp and work with complex and dynamic issues as they arise. By applying humanist approaches to real world problems, students will learn to evaluate research and apply analytical methodologies from various disciplines to specific situations and questions. This intellectual flexibility, the hallmark of humanist approaches attuned to change and contingency, is foundational to the type of leadership necessary for an interconnected world.

The M.A. in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies will prepare students linguistically, culturally, and intellectually for participation in top Ph.D. programs and for careers in government and non-profit and private sectors in or related to Asia and the Middle East. It is designed to complement professional degrees (e.g. in business, journalism, law, library and information science, global public health, medicine, public policy, social work) for students planning to practice abroad or with populations within the United States.

Master of Arts Degree

M.A. students must complete 33 hours of graduate study. At least 18 credit hours must be from courses offered within the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies. Students must complete a written comprehensive exam and a master’s thesis.

M.A. students select one of two courses of study upon entering the program: the Interdisciplinary track or the Chinese track.

The Interdisciplinary Track

ASIA 725Critical Approaches to Asian and Middle Eastern Studies3
One research methodologies course3
At least three courses within one of the following regions: 9
East Asia
Middle East
South Asia
Five additional courses selected in consultation with a graduate advisor15
An M.A. thesis3
Total Hours33

Language prerequisites and expectations

Students in the interdisciplinary track must complete language study through 306 or its equivalent in a language taught within the Department of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies. Only courses numbered 400 and above count towards the M.A., so students are encouraged to complete language study through 306 before beginning their M.A. They are also expected to continue language study beyond 306, and/or to develop advanced skills in one language and intermediate skills in a second language during their two years of M.A. coursework.

Students are strongly encouraged to complete a study abroad program or internship in their region of expertise either before or during M.A. study.

The Chinese Track

ASIA 725Critical Approaches to Asian and Middle Eastern Studies3
One research methodologies course3
At least three language and/or culture courses related to China9
Five additional courses selected in consultation with a graduate advisor15
An M.A. thesis3
Total Hours33

Language prerequisites and expectations

CHIN 408 or its equivalent is a prerequisite for admission into the Chinese track. Students are strongly encouraged to continue their study of Chinese beyond the 408 level.

Students are strongly encouraged to complete a study abroad program or internship in China either before or during their M.A. study.

Professors

Mark Driscoll, Morgan Pitelka, Nadia Yaqub. 

Associate Professors

Uffe Bergeton, Mark Driscoll, Li-ling Hsiao, Ji-Yeon Jo, Pamela Lothspeich, Yaron Shemer, Afroz Taj, Robin Visser, Claudia Yaghoobi, Gang Yue.

Assistant Professors

I Jonathan Kief, Ana Vinea.

Teaching Professors

Yuki Aratake, Yi Zhou.

Teaching Associate Professors

Shahla Adel, Dongsoo Bang, John Caldwell, Doria El Kerdany, Yuko Kato, Bud Kauffman, Jia Lin, Lini Ge Polin, Hanna Sprintzik.

Teaching Assistant Professors

Luoyi Cai, Dwayne Dixon, Fumi Iwashita, Eunji Lee, Caroline Robinson, Katsu Sawamura.

Professor of the Practice

Didem Havlioglu.

Affiliated Faculty

Barbara Ambros (Religious Studies), Lorraine Aragon (Anthropology), Benjamin Arbuckle (Anthropology), Cemil Aydin (History), Inger Brodey (English and Comparative Literature), Yong Cai (Sociology), Jocelyn Chua (Anthropology), Peter A. Coclanis (History), Barbara Entwisle (Sociology), Carl Ernst (Religious Studies), Michael Figueroa (Music), Emma Flatt (History), Banu Gökariksel (Geography), Guang Guo (Sociology), Juliane Hammer (Religious Studies), Gail Henderson (Social Medicine), Carmen Hsu (Romance Studies), Heidi Kim (English and Comparative Literature), Michelle King (History), Charles Kurzman (Sociology), David Lambert (Religious Studies), Christian Lentz (Geography), Lauren Leve (Religious Studies), Townsend Middleton (Anthropology), Christopher Nelson (Anthropology), Donald M. Nonini (Anthropology), Lisa Pearce (Sociology), Xue Lan Rong (Education), Steven Rosefielde (Economics), David Ross (English and Comparative Literature), Iqbal Sevea (History), Sarah Shields (History), Kumi Silva (Communication), Jennifer Smith (Linguistics), Sara Smith (Geography), Yan Song (City and Regional Planning), Eren Tasar (History), Meenu Tewari (City and Regional Planning), Michael Tsin (History), Margaret Wiener (Anthropology).

Professors Emeriti

Jan Bardsley, Wendan Li, Jerome P. Seaton.

Senior Lecturer Emeritus

Eric Henry.

Courses 

ASIA–Asian Studies

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate-level Courses

ASIA 425. Beyond Hostilities: Israeli-Palestinian Exchanges and Partnerships in Film, Literature, and Music. 3 Credits.

Focuses on the various collaborations, exchanges, and mutual enrichment between Israelis and Palestinians in the realm of culture, particularly literature and cinema. These connections include language (Israeli Jewish authors writing in Arabic and Palestinian writers who choose Hebrew as their language of expression), collaborating in filmmaking, and joint educational initiatives.
Gen Ed: BN, GL.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: PWAD 425, JWST 425.

ASIA 427. Cold War Culture in East Asia: Transnational and Intermedial Connections. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the specific contours that the Cold War accrued in East Asia. Focusing on literature and film, it explores what the fall of the Japanese Empire and the emergence of the post-1945 world meant across the region.
Gen Ed: LA, BN, CI.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: CMPL 527, PWAD 427.

ASIA 429. Culture and Power in Southeast Asia. 3 Credits.

The formation and transformation of values, identities, and expressive forms in Southeast Asia in response to forms of power. Emphasis on the impact of colonialism, the nation-state, and globalization.
Gen Ed: SS, BN, GL.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ANTH 429, FOLK 429.

ASIA 431. Persian Sufi Literature. 3 Credits.

This course aims to explore Persian Sufism, its foundation, Sufi practices and doctrines, and Sufi themes in literature. By looking at its development, we will examine the nature of Sufism, the controversies and debates, and the influence of Sufism on the literary dimension of the Islamic world.
Gen Ed: LA, CI, GL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

ASIA 435. The Cinemas of the Middle East and North Africa. 3 Credits.

This course explores the social, cultural, political, and economic contexts in which films are made and exhibited and focuses on shared intra-regional cinematic trends pertaining to discourse, aesthetics, and production.
Gen Ed: VP, BN, GL.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: PWAD 435, CMPL 535.

ASIA 436. Language, Exile, and Homeland in Zionist Thought and Practice. 3 Credits.

Employing Zionist and post- and anti-Zionist documents, treatises, and mostly literary and cinematic texts, this class will focus on the relations between language, Jewish-Israeli identity, and the notion of homeland. Previously offered as HEBR 436.
Gen Ed: BN, GL.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: JWST 436.

ASIA 440. Gender in Indian History. 3 Credits.

An analysis of the roles of women and men in Indian societies from the early to the modern periods. Topics include the cultural construction of gender and sexuality; beauty and bodily practices; gender and religion; gender and politics; race, imperialism, and gender. Previously offered as HIST/ASIA 556.
Gen Ed: HS, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: HIST 440.

ASIA 441. Religion, Co-existence, and Conflict in Pre-Colonial India. 3 Credits.

This course traces the fascinating history of material, cultural, and theological exchanges and conflicts between individuals belonging to two of the world's major religions: Hinduism and Islam. Throughout the course we will also analyze how modern commentators have selectively used the past to inform their understandings of the present. Previously offered as HIST/ASIA 555.
Gen Ed: HS, WB.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: HIST 442.

ASIA 442. Postcolonial Literature of the Middle East. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to postcolonial literature and theory. The main focus in the course is on literary texts and literary analysis. However, we will use postcolonial theory to engage critically with the primary texts within a postcolonial framework. We will explore language, identity, physical and mental colonization, and decolonization.
Gen Ed: LA, CI, GL.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: CMPL 442.

ASIA 445. Asian Religions in America. 3 Credits.

A study of intercultural interaction and interreligious encounter focusing on Asian religions in America, 1784 to the present.
Gen Ed: GL, US.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: RELI 445.

ASIA 447. Gender, Space, and Place in the Middle East. 3 Credits.

Examines gender, space, and place relationships in the modern Middle East. Investigates shifting gender geographies of colonialism, nationalism, modernization, and globalization in this region. (GHA)
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: GEOG 447, WGST 447.

ASIA 453. Global Shangri-La: Tibet in the Modern World. 3 Credits.

An examination of the history, society, and culture of modern Tibet and its imagination in the context of international politics and from a multidisciplinary perspective.
Gen Ed: SS, BN, GL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

ASIA 469. Asian Economic Systems. 3 Credits.

This course provides an in-depth examination of the behavioral principles and performances of five core Asian economic systems: Japan, China, Taiwan/South Korea, North Korea and Thailand.
Requisites: Prerequisites, ECON 400, and 310 or 410; a grade of C or better in ECON 400, and 310 or 410 is required.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ECON 469.

ASIA 471. Gender and Sexuality in Middle Eastern Literature. 3 Credits.

We examine gender and sexuality in literature written by various authors from the Middle East. Our discussions will focus on the significance of sexuality, harems, same-sex desire and homosexuality, construction of female sexuality, masculinity, contraception and abortion, the institution of marriage, gay/lesbian underground subcultures, and social media as sexual outlet.
Gen Ed: LA, CI, GL.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: WGST 471.

ASIA 482. Sex, Gender, and Religion in South Asia. 3 Credits.

This seminar draws on feminist and philosophical theory, including the works of Plato, Butler, and Foucualt, as well as postcolonial theory, to explore the categories of sex and gender in South Asian religions. We also analyze the moral cultivation of the self in relation to gender identity in South Asia.
Gen Ed: PH, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: RELI 482, WGST 482.

ASIA 483. Cross-Currents in East-West Literature. 3 Credits.

The study of the influence of Western texts upon Japanese authors and the influence of conceptions of "the East" upon Western writers. Goldsmith, Voltaire, Soseki, Sterne, Arishima, Ibsen, Yoshimoto, Ishiguro.
Gen Ed: LA, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: CMPL 483.

ASIA 485. Gender and Sexuality in Islam. 3 Credits.

This course approaches constructions of gender and sexuality in Muslim societies in diverse historical and geographical contexts. It focuses on changing interpretations of gender roles and sexual norms. Themes include gender in Islamic law, sexual ethics, masculinity, homosexuality, marriage, and dress.
Gen Ed: BN, CI.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: RELI 485.

ASIA 486. Islam and Feminism/Islamic Feminism. 3 Credits.

This course explores Muslim women scholars, activists, and movements that have, over the course of the past 150 years, participated in the debate about the compatibility and relationship of Islam and feminism. It offers an introduction to feminist debates about religion and patriarchy focusing on Islam as 'other' and juxtaposes it critical analysis of contextual expressions of Muslim and Islamic feminist activists, thinkers, and movements that challenge and change gender norms and practices.
Gen Ed: BN, GL.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: RELI 486.

ASIA 487. Mountains, Pilgrimage, and Sacred Places in Japan. 3 Credits.

This course explores the role that mountains and pilgrimage have played in Japanese cosmology and how they relate to methodology of studying place and space.
Gen Ed: BN, CI.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: RELI 487.

ASIA 488. Shinto in Japanese History. 3 Credits.

This course discusses the development of Shinto in Japanese history and covers themes such as myths, syncretism, sacred sites, iconography, nativism, religion and the state, and historiography.
Gen Ed: BN, CI, WB.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: RELI 488.

ASIA 489. Animals in Japanese Religion. 3 Credits.

Permission of the instructor. This course examines the cultural construction of animals in Japanese myth, folklore, and religion.
Gen Ed: LA, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: RELI 489.

ASIA 490. Advanced Topics in Asian Studies. 1-4 Credits.

The course topic will vary with the instructor.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 3 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

ASIA 496. Independent Readings. 1-3 Credits.

Permission of the department. For the student who wishes to create and pursue a project in Asian studies under the supervision of a selected instructor. Course is limited to three credit hours per semester.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

ASIA 522. Beauty and Power in the Classical Indian World. 3 Credits.

This course combines readings in representative literary cultures in Sanskrit and several other literary languages from India's classical period circa 400 BCE to 1200 CE in translation, emphasizing poetry and related aesthetic theories, with scholarly readings on Sanskrit poetics, and the literary and political history of the period. Seminar format.
Gen Ed: LA, WB.
Grading status: Letter grade.

ASIA 536. Revolution in the Modern Middle East. 3 Credits.

This course will focus on revolutionary change in the Middle East during the last century, emphasizing internal social, economic, and political conditions as well as international contexts.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: HIST 536.

ASIA 537. Women in the Middle East. 3 Credits.

Explores the lives of women in the Middle East and how they have changed over time. Focus will change each year.
Gen Ed: HS, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: HIST 537, WGST 537.

ASIA 538. The Middle East and the West. 3 Credits.

This course explores changing interactions between the Middle East and the West, including trade, warfare, scientific exchange, and imperialism, and ends with an analysis of contemporary relations in light of the legacy of the past.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: HIST 538.

ASIA 539. The Economic History of Southeast Asia. 3 Credits.

This course is intended as a broad overview of Southeast Asian economic history from premodern times to the present day.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: HIST 539.

ASIA 545. The Politics of Culture in East Asia. 3 Credits.

Examines struggles to define culture and the nation in 20th-century China in domains like popular culture, museums, traditional medicine, fiction, film, ethnic group politics, and biography and autobiography.
Gen Ed: SS, BN, GL.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ANTH 545.

ASIA 557. Fiction and History in India. 3 Credits.

This course examines the histories, representations, and cultural perceptions surrounding bandits and rebels in modern India. The representations of bandits and rebels are studied in the light of the emergence of nationalism, shifting notions of gender and masculinity, race relations, and emergence of capitalist structures.
Gen Ed: HS, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: HIST 557.

ASIA 570. The Vietnam War. 3 Credits.

A wide-ranging exploration of America's longest war, from 19th-century origins to 1990s legacies, from village battlegrounds to the Cold War context, from national leadership to popular participation and impact.
Gen Ed: HS, GL.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: HIST 570, PWAD 570.

ASIA 574. Chinese World Views. 3 Credits.

Explores the indigenous Chinese sciences and the cosmological ideas that informed them. Topics include astronomy, divination, medicine, fengshui, and political and literary theory. Chinese sources in translation are emphasized.
Gen Ed: SS, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ANTH 574, RELI 574.

ASIA 581. Sufism. 3 Credits.

Permission of the instructor. A survey of Islamic mysticism, its sources in the Qur'an and the Prophet Muhammad, and its literary, cultural, and social deployment in Arab, Persian, Indic, and Turkish regions.
Gen Ed: BN, WB.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: RELI 581.

ASIA 582. Islam and Islamic Art in South Asia. 3 Credits.

A survey of the formation of Islamic traditions in the subcontinent from the eighth century to the present, with emphasis on religion and politics, the role of Sufism, types of popular religion, and questions of Islamic identity.
Gen Ed: HS, BN, WB.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: RELI 582.

ASIA 583. Religion and Culture in Iran, 1500-Present. 3 Credits.

Iran from the rise of the Safavid empire to the Islamic Republic. Topics include Shi'ism, politics, intellectual and sectarian movements, encounters with colonialism, art and architecture, music, literature.
Gen Ed: HS, BN, WB.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: RELI 583.

ASIA 584. The Qur'an as Literature. 3 Credits.

A nontheological approach to the Qur'an as a literary text, emphasizing its history, form, style, and interpretation.
Gen Ed: LA, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: RELI 584.

ASIA 681. Readings in Islamicate Literatures. 3 Credits.

Permission of the instructor. Study of selected religious, literary, and historical texts in Arabic, Persian, or Urdu.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit. 6 total credits. 2 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: RELI 681, ARAB 681.

ASIA 682. Contemporary Chinese Society. 3 Credits.

Presents recent anthropological research on the People's Republic of China. In addition to social sciences sources, fictional genres are used to explore the particular modernity of Chinese society and culture.
Gen Ed: SS, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ANTH 682.

ASIA 691H. Senior Honors Thesis I. 3 Credits.

Permission of the department. Required for honors students in Asian studies.
Gen Ed: EE- Mentored Research.
Grading status: Letter grade.

ASIA 692H. Senior Honors Thesis II. 3 Credits.

Permission of the department. Required for honors students in Asian studies.
Gen Ed: EE- Mentored Research.
Grading status: Letter grade.

Graduate-level Courses 

ASIA 720. Methods and Themes in Asian and Middle Eastern History. 3 Credits.

This graduate-level course introduces recent scholarly publications in the broad field of Asian history. Covered themes include environmental history and space, colonial and urban contexts, daily life, and margins.
Grading status: Letter grade.

ASIA 721. Transnational Feminisms of the Middle East and South Asia. 3 Credits.

This seminar introduces students to transnational feminisms of the Middle East and South Asia. It examines a diverse range of women's thought and responses to the global and the local in this part of the world, with a focus on theoretical paradigms and tools to better understand women in a global context. Research methods also emphasized in this seminar.
Grading status: Letter grade.

ASIA 722. Asia in Motion: TransAsia and Transpacific Approaches to the Study of Asia. 3 Credits.

This graduate seminar examines theoretical and research texts related to the mobility of people, languages, ideas, and cultures across Asia and the Pacific. This course aims to critically investigate Asia's past and present with TransAsia and Transpacific perspectives through examining five main themes related to Asian mobilities; 1) Empires, 2) Labor, 3) Transnational Family, 4) Language and Media, and 5) Citizenship.
Grading status: Letter grade.

ASIA 725. Critical Approaches to Asian and Middle Eastern Studies. 3 Credits.

This interdisciplinary graduate seminar is a foundational course for the M.A. in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies. The seminar introduces critical theories and disciplinary and interdisciplinary methodologies in studying South Asia, East Asia, and the Middle East. It studies the regions in part and as a whole by applying regional, transnational and global lenses, taking seriously relevant languages, cultural formations, histories, and philosophies. The seminar employs theoretical, ontological and epistemological terrains to critically analyze texts/media.
Grading status: Letter grade.

ASIA 730. The East Asian Anthropocene: Culture, Climate and Colonialism in Japan and China. 3 Credits.

This course is intended as a graduate seminar devoted to the new topic of the Anthropocene and the ways in which capitalism and climate change have emerged therein. However, we will focus on the ramifications of the Anthropocene for East Asia (especially Japan and China).
Grading status: Letter grade.

ASIA 731. Technologies of Imagination: Science, Cultural Production, East Asia. 3 Credits.

Focusing on East Asia, this seminar introduces students to scholarly intersections between science studies and literary and cultural studies. Drawing upon recent scholarship from these fields, it explores the intertwined pasts and presents of scientific, technological, and cultural production. In so doing, it challenges students to think critically about the contingent nature of disciplinary boundaries and the centrality of East Asia's place in global flows of knowledge, objects, and expression.
Grading status: Letter grade.

ASIA 740. Chinese Civilization: A Conceptual History. 3 Credits.

This seminar will look at how terms for concepts of 'civilization' in different languages (Old Chinese, Modern Mandarin, English, Japanese) and different historical periods have been used to refer to what is now China as a "civilization." This graduate seminar explores the roles played by various notions of 'civilization' in the articulation of different conceptualizations of "Chinese civilization."
Grading status: Letter grade.

ASIA 741. Honglou Meng: The Story of the Stone. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the most celebrated novel titled Honglou Meng or The Story of the Stone by Cao Xueqin (1715-1763). This 120-chapter-long novel tells the downfall of a great aristocratic family that is presented as a microcosm of traditional Chinese societies. The novel features all aspects of traditional Chinese cultures including architecture and garden, education, families and interfamilial connections, generational relationships, genders, history, marriages, mythology, philosophies, poetry, etc.
Grading status: Letter grade.

ASIA 742. Indigenous Ecologies in Sinophone Literature. 3 Credits.

This seminar applies theories from Postcolonial Ecocriticism and Sinophone Studies to analyze diverse indigenous ecologies in Chinese-language environmental literature. We read poems, philosophy, and fiction (in Chinese or English translation) featuring the cosmologies of Han farmers, Tibetan and Mongolian nomads, Indigenous Taiwanese hunters and fishers, and Hmong foragers, analyzing relational ontologies among humans, non-human animals, assemblages, and ecosystems. Knowledge of Chinese language, literature, history, or philosophy recommended but not required.
Grading status: Letter grade.

ASIA 770. The Moving Imagination. 3 Credits.

This graduate seminar investigates competing concepts of modernity in South Asia as imagined in film and television media. We begin by exploring how notions of modernity have emerged in South Asia, and how film and television have imagined a "modern" society. Particular topics covered include social justice, gender, nation, globalization, and cosmopolitanism. We will also engage with critiques of films, television programs, and Internet-based videos with respect to social justice, environment, and technology.
Grading status: Letter grade.

ASIA 771. Performance in South Asia: Contexts and Theories. 3 Credits.

This seminar examines a range of performance practices in South Asia, and some of the theories and methods scholars have used to research and understand them. It especially focuses on emerging analytical frameworks and approaches currently shaping the field. In this seminar, "performance" is conceptualized broadly to include aesthetic, social and political forms of performance spanning theatre, dance, musical concerts, film, religious events, military rituals, and so forth.
Grading status: Letter grade.

ASIA 780. Minorities in the Middle East. 3 Credits.

This course enriches students' understanding of the diversity of Middle Eastern countries, exploring histories of intercommunal contact and conflict. We will investigate contemporary representations and lived realities of religious, ethnic, and sexual minorities of the Middle East from diverse political, cultural, historical and aesthetic perspectives. Although the majority of people living in the Middle East converted to Islam after the Arab conquests, there remained important minorities including indigenous Christians, Jews, and in Iran some Zoroastrians.
Grading status: Letter grade.

ASIA 781. The Body and Body Politics in the Arab World. 3 Credits.

What is political about the body? This seminar introduces students to social scientific and humanistic approaches to the body. Instead of taking the body as simply a biological entity, it places it within a wider network of meanings, practices, institutions, histories, and forms of power. The course explores the operations of different regimes of power on and in the body and, conversely, shows how the body can become a locus of resistance and creativity.
Grading status: Letter grade.

ASIA 782. Visual Culture of the Middle East. 3 Credits.

Examines the role of images in the modern ME & how these images shape transnational relationships and conceptions of the region within the global imaginary. How do images "speak"? What role do they play in constructing subjectivities and identities of belonging? What is their relationship to power locally and globally? We will analyze a variety of texts and media (film, photography, video, television, modern art, street art, graphic novels, social media, etc) from the ME.
Grading status: Letter grade.

ASIA 783. Critical Postcolonial Perspectives on the Arab-Jew: Promises and Limitations. 3 Credits.

This seminar investigates the rise of the radical discourse and literature on the Arab-Jew / Mizrahi in the late 1980s and explores its connection to Israel's "new historians," post-Zionism, and post-nationalism and to Third-worldism. With the increasing presence of the Arab-Jew / Mizrahi in academic discourse and, to an extent, in Israeli (and Arab) media and culture, the original discourse has witnessed various permutations and increasing diversification from its inception to the present.
Grading status: Letter grade.

ASIA 785. Critical Genealogies of Middle East and North Africa Studies. 3 Credits.

This seminar is the core course for the graduate certificate in Middle East studies. It is an introduction to critical issues in the disciplinary, interdisciplinary, and cross-disciplinary study of the Middle East.
Grading status: Letter grade.

ARAB–Arab World (in English) and Arabic

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate-level Courses

ARAB 407. Readings in Arabic I. 3 Credits.

Classical and/or modern readings in Arabic and discussions in conversational Arabic, according to the students' interest.
Requisites: Prerequisite, ARAB 306.
Gen Ed: LA, BN, CI.
Grading status: Letter grade.

ARAB 408. Readings in Arabic II. 3 Credits.

Classical and/or modern readings in Arabic and discussions in conversational Arabic, according to the students' interest.
Requisites: Prerequisite, ARAB 306.
Gen Ed: LA, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade.

ARAB 432. Science and Society in the Middle East. 3 Credits.

This class explores science and society in the modern Middle East. Drawing on works from anthropology and history, it investigates how science interacts with, is shaped by, and reflects wider processes and formations such as nationalism, colonialism, religion, subject formation, or cultural production. Previously offered as ARAB 353.
Gen Ed: SS, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ANTH 432.

ARAB 434. Modern Arabic Literature in Translation. 3 Credits.

We will study fiction from several countries in the Arab world with a particular emphasis on recent works. This literature has arisen out of the lived experiences of people in the Arab world, but each work creates a world of its own. What strategies do writers use for this world-making? What relationships might exist between these fictional worlds and their writing contexts? Who is addressed by these works? Previously offered as ARAB 334.
Gen Ed: LA, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade.

ARAB 453. Film, Nation, and Identity in the Arab World. 3 Credits.

Introduction to history of Arab cinema from 1920s to present. Covers film industries in various regions of the Arab world and transnational Arab film. All materials and discussion in English.
Gen Ed: VP, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade.

ARAB 496. Independent Readings in Arabic. 1-3 Credits.

Permission of the department. For the student who wishes to create and pursue an independent project in Arabic under the supervision of a selected instructor. Maximum three credit hours per semester.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit. 12 total credits. 4 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

ARAB 681. Readings in Islamicate Literatures. 3 Credits.

Permission of the instructor. Study of selected religious, literary, and historical texts in Arabic, Persian, or Urdu.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit. 6 total credits. 2 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: RELI 681, ASIA 681.

CHIN–China (in English) and Chinese

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate-level Courses

CHIN 407. Readings in Modern Chinese I. 3 Credits.

Read authentic texts of modern Chinese, including newspaper articles and writings of literary, cultural, and social interest. Writing Chinese characters is required.
Requisites: Prerequisite, CHIN 306.
Gen Ed: BN.
Grading status: Letter grade.

CHIN 408. Readings in Modern Chinese II. 3 Credits.

Read authentic texts of modern Chinese, including newspaper articles and writings of literary, cultural, and social interest. Writing Chinese characters is required.
Requisites: Prerequisite, CHIN 407.
Gen Ed: BN.
Grading status: Letter grade.

CHIN 441. Chinese-English Translation and Interpreting. 3 Credits.

Instruction and practice in Chinese-to-English translation (written) and interpreting (oral), designed for second-language learners of Chinese. Students work with materials covering many fields. Students in track A can take this course either concurrently with or after CHIN 407, but students in track B can take this course only after completing CHIN 313.
Gen Ed: SS, CI.
Grading status: Letter grade.

CHIN 443. Business Communication in Chinese. 3 Credits.

The goal of this course is to improve students' overall language proficiency using Chinese for business purposes. They will develop enhanced skills of reading business journalism and case studies and writing business letters or email messages. Students in track A can take this course either concurrently with or after CHIN 407, but students in track B can take this course only after completing CHIN 313.
Gen Ed: BN, CI.
Grading status: Letter grade.

CHIN 445. Chinese Tea Culture and Its Changing Landscape. 3 Credits.

An advanced Chinese language course that explores the world of Chinese tea culture, history and its impact on everyday life in contemporary China. Myths and philosophies related to tea will be analyzed to offer students a deeper understanding of Chinese tea history and culture. Students in track A can take this course either concurrently with or after CHIN 407, but students in track B can take this course only after completing CHIN 313.
Grading status: Letter grade.

CHIN 463. Narrative Ethics in Modern China. 3 Credits.

By exploring intersections of the narrative and the normative, this course considers relations between text, ethics, and everyday life in 20th-century China by reading texts on aesthetics.
Gen Ed: PH, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade.

CHIN 464. The City in Modern Chinese Literature and Film. 3 Credits.

This course analyzes historical changes of the city through examining the individual, national, and global identity of Shanghai, Beijing, Taipei, and Hong Kong as reflected in their histories, politics, built environment, ethos, language, and culture.
Gen Ed: LA, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade.

CHIN 490. Topics in Chinese Literature and Language. 3 Credits.

Readings in Chinese literature and language on varying topics. May be taken more than once for credit as topics change. Students in track A can take this course either concurrently with or after CHIN 407, but students in track B can take this course only after completing CHIN 313.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

CHIN 496. Independent Readings in Chinese. 1-3 Credits.

Permission of the department. For the student who wishes to create and pursue an independent project in Chinese under the supervision of a selected instructor. Maximum three credit hours per semester.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

CHIN 510. Introduction to Classical Chinese. 3 Credits.

Advanced study of Chinese classics. Students in track A can take this course either concurrently with or after CHIN 407, but students in track B can take this course only after completing CHIN 313.
Gen Ed: BN, WB.
Grading status: Letter grade.

CHIN 521. Chinese History in Chinese. 3 Credits.

This is a fifth-year Chinese course offered as a language course to improve students' language abilities and as a content course surveying Chinese history in Chinese.
Requisites: Prerequisite, CHIN 408 or CHIN 313.
Gen Ed: HS, WB.
Grading status: Letter grade.

CHIN 525. Ancient Philosophers and Their Modern Reincarnation. 3 Credits.

Recommended preparation, CHIN 510. This course examines the reinterpretation and appropriation of ancient Chinese philosophy in contemporary China, on such themes as Confucian ethics and Daoist metaphysics and aesthetics.
Requisites: Prerequisite, CHIN 408, or 313.
Gen Ed: PH, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade.

CHIN 545. Chinese Science Fiction. 3 Credits.

This research seminar contextualizes the contemporary explosion of Chinese science fiction within modern Chinese intellectual history and SF studies worldwide. We read globally influential novels such as The Three-Body Problem and trace several waves of the genre's century-long evolution within Chinese literature. We ask how threats of global annihilation, the exhaustion of environmental resources, discoveries in virology, epigenetics, and innovations in cybernetics intersect with global development, climate migration, decolonization, and structures of race and class.
Gen Ed: LA, BN, CI.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: CMPL 545.

CHIN 551. Chinese Poetry in Translation. 3 Credits.

Selected topics in Chinese poetry concentrating on one period or one genre.
Gen Ed: LA, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade.

CHIN 552. Chinese Prose in Translation. 3 Credits.

Selected topics in Chinese fiction, historical writing, and prose belles lettres, concentrating on one period or one genre.
Gen Ed: LA, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade.

CHIN 562. Contemporary Chinese Urban Culture and Arts. 3 Credits.

This course analyzes contemporary Chinese urban art, architecture, cinema, and fiction to elucidate dynamics between the built environment and subjectivity. Students analyze how social, economic, and political factors shape environments, and debate whether new urban spaces create social conflict or new civil possibilities.
Gen Ed: VP, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade.

CHIN 590. Advanced Topics in Chinese Literature and Language. 3 Credits.

This is an advanced topics course in Chinese literature and language, culture and society. The instruction is entirely in Chinese with the use of authentic materials. Three hours per week.
Requisites: Prerequisite, CHIN 408 or 313.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

CHIN 624. Chinese Internet Literature. 3 Credits.

Recommended preparation, at least one advanced Chinese language course above the CHIN 408 or CHIN 313 level. This is a content and language course designed for advanced (native or near-native fluency) undergraduate and graduate students to enhance the four language abilities and cultural literacy. Students will read The Story of Minglan, and analyze the problematic portrayals of traditional women's domestic lives.
Requisites: Prerequisite, CHIN 313 or CHIN 408.
Gen Ed: LA, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade.

CHIN 631. Writing Chinese (in) America: Advanced Studies of a Foreign Literature from United States Homeland. 3 Credits.

Recommended preparation, at least one advanced Chinese language course above the CHIN 408 or CHIN 313 level. Encompasses a century of literary writings on the experiences of Chinese in the United States. The select works are written for Chinese communities worldwide, hence "writing Chinese in America," while they reflect upon the formation of Chinese American identity, therefore "writing Chinese America."
Requisites: Prerequisite, CHIN 313 or CHIN 408.
Gen Ed: LA, CI, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

HNUR–South Asia (in English) and Hindi-Urdu

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate-level Courses

HNUR 407. South Asian Society and Culture. 3 Credits.

Advanced language course introducing authentic readings on cultural and social topics relating to modern South Asian society. Texts are supplemented by case studies and interviews. Course is taught in Hindi-Urdu and provides further training in speaking and writing. Participation in extracurricular activities is encouraged.
Requisites: Prerequisites, HNUR 305 and 306.
Gen Ed: BN.
Grading status: Letter grade.

HNUR 408. South Asian Media and Film. 3 Credits.

This advanced language course introduces students to authentic film and visual and print media from modern South Asia, analyzed within historical, social, and aesthetic contexts. Course is taught in Hindi-Urdu with further training in speaking and writing. Participation in relevant extracurricular activities is encouraged.
Requisites: Prerequisites, HNUR 305 and 306.

HNUR 409. Sex and Social Justice in South Asia. 3 Credits.

This seminar explores the issues of gender, sexuality, and social justice in modern India and Pakistan. The course uses a variety of media sources, including monographs, films, television shows, documentaries, newspapers, and magazines.
Requisites: Prerequisites, HNUR 305 and 306.
Gen Ed: SS, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade.

HNUR 410. Seminar on the Urdu-Hindi Ghazal. 3 Credits.

Ghazal is the most important genre of Urdu-Hindi poetry from the 18th century to the present. This course, taught in Hindi-Urdu, concerns the analysis and interpretation of ghazals.
Requisites: Prerequisite, HNUR 305 and 306.
Gen Ed: LA, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade.

HNUR 411. Health and Medicine in South Asia. 3 Credits.

This seminar explores approaches to health and medicine in India and Pakistan, and contemporary public health challenges in South Asia and diaspora communities in North Carolina. Also addresses "alternative" systems of medical thought in South Asia including Ayurveda, Unani Medicine, Yoga, Naturopathy, and Homeopathy.
Requisites: Prerequisites, HNUR 305 and 306.
Gen Ed: SS, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade.

HNUR 490. Topics in Hindi-Urdu Literature and Language. 3 Credits.

Course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. Possible areas of study include Indian film and literature, Hindi-English translations, the Indian diaspora, Hindi journalism, and readings in comparative religions.
Requisites: Prerequisites, HNUR 305 and 306.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit. 12 total credits. 4 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

HNUR 496. Independent Readings in Hindi-Urdu. 1-3 Credits.

Permission of the department. For the student who wishes to create and pursue an independent project in Hindi-Urdu under the supervision of a selected instructor. Maximum three credit hours per semester.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

HNUR 592. Religious Conflict and Literature in India. 3 Credits.

Historical causes of violence between Hindus and Muslims in modern India. Short stories, poetry, and novels in translation are used to explore how conflicts over religious sites, religious conversion, image worship, and language contributed to a sense of conflicting religious identity.
Gen Ed: LA, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: RELI 592.

JAPN–Japan (in English) and Japanese

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate-level Courses

JAPN 401. Gateway to Mastering Japanese. 3 Credits.

This course reviews the key grammar, vocabulary, and characters from the first three years of Japanese in preparation for the more advanced work of fourth-year elective courses.
Requisites: Prerequisite, JAPN 306.
Grading status: Letter grade.

JAPN 408. Japanese Journalism. 3 Credits.

Uses newspaper and magazine articles and television broadcasts to introduce journalistic writing and speech as well as contemporary social and cultural issues. Class conducted in Japanese. Participation in relevant extracurricular activities encouraged. .
Requisites: Prerequisite, JAPN 306.
Gen Ed: BN.
Grading status: Letter grade.

JAPN 410. Topics in Contemporary Japanese Literature. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the popular writing, both fiction and nonfiction, designed for mass-market consumption in contemporary Japan. Class conducted in Japanese. Participation in relevant extracurricular activities encouraged.
Requisites: Prerequisite, JAPN 306.
Gen Ed: BN.
Grading status: Letter grade.

JAPN 411. Food and Culture in Japan. 3 Credits.

Advanced Japanese course designed to develop Japanese skills and deepen appreciation of Japanese cooking. Students will develop the ability to discuss and write about topic-oriented issues in Japanese.
Requisites: Prerequisite, JAPN 306.
Gen Ed: BN.
Grading status: Letter grade.

JAPN 412. Making Music in Japan. 3 Credits.

Students will learn a history of postwar Japanese music as an integral part of Japanese society and culture, and try to understand what messages each song attempts to communicate.
Requisites: Prerequisite, JAPN 306.
Gen Ed: VP, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade.

JAPN 414. Manga as a Japanese Art and Culture. 3 Credits.

This course explores contemporary Japanese language and culture through the pop cultural media of manga and anime. Topics include manga history, production, and various genres of Japanese comic books, manga.
Requisites: Prerequisite, JAPN 306.
Gen Ed: VP.
Grading status: Letter grade.

JAPN 415. Sports in Japanese Culture. 3 Credits.

Introduces students to the unique Japanese cultural perspective on sports, while introducing new kanji and grammar structures and improving reading, speaking, and writing abilities.
Requisites: Prerequisite, JAPN 306.
Grading status: Letter grade.

JAPN 416. Understanding Japanese Business Culture and Its Practice. 3 Credits.

Students will learn about business culture in Japan, including customs and rules, in order to broaden their understanding of Japanese culture and people, while improving their language skills.
Requisites: Prerequisite, JAPN 306.
Grading status: Letter grade.

JAPN 417. Japanese Culture through Film and Literature. 3 Credits.

This course helps students to improve their Japanese language skills while developing an understanding of Japanese culture through films and literature. Exercises include reading novels in Japanese, close observation of Japanese films, analysis of cultural context, writing summaries, and frequent discussion.
Requisites: Prerequisite, JAPN 306.
Gen Ed: LA, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade.

JAPN 451. Swords, Tea Bowls, and Woodblock Prints: Exploring Japanese Material Culture. 3 Credits.

This course surveys Japanese material culture. Each week we will examine a different genre of visual or material culture in terms of its production, circulation through time and space, and modern deployment in narratives of national identity. This course includes regular engagement with the Ackland Art Museum at UNC.
Gen Ed: HS, EE- Field Work.
Grading status: Letter grade.

JAPN 482. Embodying Japan: The Cultures of Beauty, Sports, and Medicine in Japan. 3 Credits.

Explores Japanese culture and society through investigating changing concepts of the human body. Sources include anthropological and history materials, science fiction, and film.
Gen Ed: SS, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade.

JAPN 490. Topics in Japanese Language and Literature. 3 Credits.

Possible areas of study include popular culture, business Japanese, and Japanese-English translation. Course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. Participation in relevant extracurricular activities encouraged.
Requisites: Prerequisite, JAPN 306.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit. 12 total credits. 4 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

JAPN 496. Independent Readings in Japanese. 1-3 Credits.

Permission of the department. For the student who wishes to create and pursue an independent project in Japanese under the supervision of a selected instructor. Maximum three credit hours per semester.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

JAPN 521. Investigating Japanese Culture through TV Dramas. 3 Credits.

Students will improve Japanese language skills while they develop an understanding of Japanese culture through TV dramas. Exercises include intensive listening, reading and analyzing drama scripts, writing summaries, and frequent discussions on various topics.
Requisites: Prerequisite, JAPN 401, 408, 409, 410, 411, 412, 413, 414, 415, 416, 417, or 490.
Gen Ed: VP, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade.

JAPN 563. Structure of Japanese. 3 Credits.

Introductory linguistic description of modern Japanese. For students of linguistics with no knowledge of Japanese and students of Japanese with no knowledge of linguistics.
Requisites: Prerequisite, JAPN 102 or LING 101.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: LING 563.

JAPN 590. Advanced Topics in Japanese Language and Literature. 3 Credits.

Topic varies by instructor. Possible topics include Japanese literature, popular culture, and media. Course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. Participation in relevant extracurricular activities encouraged.
Requisites: Prerequisite, JAPN 306.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

KOR–Korea (in English) and Korean

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate-level Courses

KOR 407. Modern Korean Literature and Culture. 3 Credits.

Modern Korean literature by major authors, from around 1940 to the present. Emphasis on reading, translation, and criticism. Students will improve their written and oral communication skills in Korean through the study of literary works in their social, cultural, and historical context.
Requisites: Prerequisite, KOR 306.
Gen Ed: BN, CI.
Grading status: Letter grade.

KOR 408. Changes and Continuities in Korean History. 3 Credits.

This course is conducted in Korean, emphasizing reading, translating, and criticism. This is a general introduction to Korean history from the first kingdom of the Korean Peninsula, Gojoseon, to the last kingdom, Joseon Dynasty.
Requisites: Prerequisite, KOR 306.
Gen Ed: BN, CI.
Grading status: Letter grade.

KOR 409. Korean Through Current Affairs. 3 Credits.

This course aims at a deeper understanding of Korean society, through critical analysis of language use and viewpoints expressed in various types of media. This course will also focus on cultural products and practices.
Requisites: Prerequisite, KOR 306.
Gen Ed: BN, CI.
Grading status: Letter grade.

KOR 447. Documenting Diasporas: Korean Diasporas in Films and Documentaries. 3 Credits.

In this course, we will explore the multiple, shifting, and often contested diasporic subjectivities represented and produced in Korean diaspora cinemas; these subjectivities encompass various Korean diaspora communities in Asia, Central Asia, Europe, and the Americas.
Gen Ed: VP, GL.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: CMPL 547.

KOR 490. Topics in Korean Language and Literature. 3 Credits.

Topic varies and course may be repeated for credit as topics change.
Requisites: Prerequisite, KOR 306.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit. 12 total credits. 4 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

KOR 496. Independent Readings in Korean. 1-3 Credits.

Permission of the department. For the student who wishes to create and pursue an independent project in Korean under the supervision of a selected instructor. Maximum three credit hours per semester.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.