Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures (GRAD)

The Carolina-Duke Graduate Program in German Studies

The Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures offers a Ph.D. in German studies in conjunction with Duke University. The Carolina–Duke graduate program in German studies is a fully merged graduate program that draws on one of the largest German studies faculties in the country, as well as on the considerable library holdings of each institution. Students apply to a single program and graduate with a diploma bearing the names of both Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

The Carolina–Duke Graduate Program in German offers students a combination of disciplinary rigor and interdisciplinary flexibility that recognizes the fundamental interrelation of all the cultural expressions of societies where the German language is spoken. Taking full advantage of the intellectual, educational, and cultural resources of two great universities, the program offers an attractive combination of individual attention in small classes and a close connection to the broader communities of literature, cultural studies, and German studies at Duke University and at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

The core German studies faculty (at a current number of 20, one of the largest in North American German studies), represents all branches of research in the field, including medieval studies, gender and sexuality studies, literary theory and poetics, European intellectual history, modernism, realism, German-Jewish studies, Holocaust studies, politics and culture in the 20th century, film and media studies, science studies, Afro-German and Turkish-German culture, and contemporary society. This ensures that all major aspects of German literary, cinematic, and cultural history, from medieval manuscripts to contemporary cinema, are covered by experts in the field.  Faculty engage in innovative, interdisciplinary teaching and research projects involving other departments and programs and support close intellectual ties with major German universities.

Students take courses full time in their first year of study; in subsequent years they acquire pedagogical training and teaching experience at both a private (Duke University) and a public (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) university. Multiple program options are available to students, from the study of historical periods and genres (medieval to contemporary) to literary criticism and theory. Interdisciplinary work is strongly encouraged.

Admission is competitive and limited to no more than seven students a year. Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill are committed to offering six consecutive years of full funding, including tuition, to students in good standing in the program.

Note: The previous Ph.D. programs in German studies at Duke University and in Germanic languages at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill no longer admit new students.

Admissions Requirements

We seek applicants with extraordinary academic records and intellectual curiosity, and we welcome applicants of any nationality, from diverse academic and cultural backgrounds. A bachelor's degree or the international equivalent is required, generally in German studies or a related field. All applications are routed through The Graduate School at UNC–Chapel Hill in a single admissions process that ensures that incoming students matriculate fully at both the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and at Duke University.

Please read UNC's admissions instructions for detailed information about the application process and requirements. Additional information is available on the Carolina-Duke website.  Questions regarding translation issues and foreign degrees and transcripts should be directed to gsll@unc.edu.

Application Deadline

Applicants are strongly encouraged to complete their applications by early December and must meet all posted deadlines.

Teaching

Teacher training is a central component of the Carolina–Duke Graduate Program in German Studies. Both departments provide rigorous training in foreign language teaching, which includes an introduction to the interdisciplinary fields of applied linguistics and second-language acquisition.

Teaching assistantships are normally available to students in their second through fifth years of study who continue to make satisfactory progress towards the completion of their degree and remain in good standing in the program.

It is crucial that teaching assistants (TAs) have highly advanced German language skills. During their first year, students' language proficiency in German will be evaluated. Only students who achieve a level of “Superior” (C1 according to ACTFL guidelines) will be asked to teach in the German language program. Students who do not possess the required proficiency in German will be expected to obtain this proficiency as soon as possible.

Beginning TAs generally teach first-year German and take the foreign language pedagogy course concurrently with their first semester of teaching. In later semesters graduate students often teach second-year German and occasionally more advanced undergraduate courses as well (German culture and society, advanced composition, introduction to German literature). In addition, students may serve as discussion leaders in larger lecture courses or serve as research assistants. 

Study and Research Abroad

Students are strongly encouraged to study and conduct research abroad as an integral part of their graduate work. Both Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have strong, long-standing partnerships with German universities.

Duke offers student exchanges with the Free University of Berlin and the University of Potsdam, programs in which graduate students in German studies regularly participate. Furthermore, select graduate students will be invited to serve as mentors, instructors, and/or program assistants in the undergraduate Duke study abroad summer program in Berlin.

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has partnerships with German universities, including exchanges with the University of Tübingen and the state of Baden-Württemberg, and a new exchange with the University of Zürich. 

Further, graduate students in German at Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have a strong track record for successful DAAD and Fulbright fellowships for study abroad.

Course of Study

  1. Five core courses: Foreign Language Pedagogy, Theories, and Practices; Foundations in German Studies, 1000 to 1750; Foundations in German Studies, 1750 to 1900; Foundations in German Studies, 1900 to the Present; and German Linguistics or History of the German language. Incoming students who have satisfactorily completed equivalent graduate courses may be exempted by the directors of graduate studies and graduate advising from one or more of the required courses.
  2. Students are required to take two courses outside the German studies program that complement the students' areas of interest in an interdisciplinary fashion. In their first semester students take all their coursework in the program. In subsequent semesters, students may take one course per semester outside the program. All courses taken outside the program must be approved by the directors of graduate study.
  3. A total of 16 courses (including those enumerated above), two of which may be credit for work on the dissertation.
  4. Demonstration of advanced reading knowledge of an additional foreign language (a language besides English and German) that is appropriate to the student’s areas of research interest.  This may be done at any point during the student’s studies, but the requirement must be satisfied prior to the time that the doctoral thesis is submitted for the final defense.
  5. A writing proficiency review, normally by the end of the second year. 
  6. A Ph.D. preliminary exam, normally by the end of the third year.
  7. A dissertation chapter and prospectus review defense, normally by the end of the fourth year.
  8. An oral dissertation defense, normally by the end of the fifth year.

In addition, students are strongly encouraged to attend the program's monthly "works-in-progress" seminar, at which faculty, advanced graduate students, and guests present their current research. Students are also strongly encouraged to audit one graduate course per semester once they have completed their required coursework during terms in which they are in residence.

Qualifying Requirements

  1. Satisfactory performance in all coursework.
  2. Satisfactory performance in the teaching program.
  3. Demonstration of proficiency in German, including all four competencies (reading, writing, speaking, and listening), at a level of “Superior” (C1 according to ACTFL guidelines), usually by the time the student enters the program or by the end of the first year of study.
  4. Demonstration of reading knowledge in a second foreign language relevant to the student's research, as approved by the directors of graduate studies.
  5. All students will submit an annual plan of study report each year prior to completion of their preliminary exam. Doing so encourages students to reflect in broad terms on their current intellectual interests and possible future trajectories for these interests. Visit the Annual Plan of Study Report web page for more information.
  6. Successful completion of the writing proficiency review, normally by the end of the second year of study. Normally, students will submit a revision of a paper originally written for one of their courses.
  7. Completion of the preliminary examination with a grade of "pass." The exam is normally taken in the third year of study.
  8. Participation in a bi-weekly dissertation colloquium once the student has successfully passed the preliminary examination, for each semester the student is in residence. Participants submit an abstract of their project at the beginning of each semester and share chapters of their work in progress.
  9. Successful completion of a dissertation chapter review, usually by the end of the fourth year of study.

Coursework

Checklist of 16 Courses

1. Foreign Language Pedagogy

2. Foundations in German Studies, 1000 to 1750

3. Foundations in German Studies, 1750 to 1900

4. Foundations in German Studies, 1900 to the Present

5. German Linguistics or History of the German Language

6–7. Electives: Courses from outside the program

8–14. Electives

15–16. Dissertation research

Carolina-Duke Courses

Students will enroll in courses both at Carolina and at Duke. In addition to the UNC German courses listed in this catalog, students should also look at the Duke graduate German courses.

Courses outside German Studies

Students will normally take at least two courses outside the German studies program. They are encouraged to take more as relevant to their interests and research.

All Carolina–Duke graduate students should familiarize themselves with Duke University's Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) requirements. International Carolina–Duke graduate students should familiarize themselves with the English Language Proficiency requirements.

Transfer Credit

Students coming in with an M.A. in German may, at the discretion of the directors of graduate studies, receive credit for coursework completed at their previous institution. A maximum of four courses can be remitted, and decisions about credit for prior coursework will be made at the end of the students' first year in the Carolina–Duke graduate program.

Reviews, Examinations, Dissertation

The Annual Plan of Study Report

All students are required to prepare and submit to the directors of graduate studies an updated plan of study form by January 31 of years one through three. Once the preliminary exam has been taken, students prepare and submit instead an abstract of their dissertation project.

The Writing Proficiency Review

For the writing proficiency review–an hour-long oral review that takes place in the second year of study–students submit a scholarly paper, normally written in English and about 30 pages in length, which expands and reworks a paper written for one of their courses. The director of graduate studies sets up a committee of three faculty members, including the student's primary advisor, in consultation with the student.

Ph.D. Committee

For the purpose of the preliminary examination and the dissertation chapter review, the Ph.D. committee consists of four faculty members, including the faculty advisor, selected by the student in consultation with the faculty advisor and the director of graduate studies. A fifth faculty member will be added to the committee for the dissertation defense. Typically, faculty members from the preliminary exam will also serve on the dissertation review and dissertation defense committees. At least one faculty member must come from each university department, and the majority of the committee must consist of Carolina–Duke German faculty members.

The Preliminary Examination

The purpose of the preliminary exam is to ensure competency in a teaching field and to establish a comprehensive intellectual framework for the dissertation project. The exam should be designed so that students approach their teaching interests and dissertation research in such a way as to engage a set of broad questions that will speak to scholars both within and outside the field of German studies. The exam centers on two equally weighted lists, one of which generally concerns itself with a broadly defined literary field, such as a recognized period, movement, or genre across several periods. The other list focuses on a more specific topic such as represents the student's projected area of doctoral research, it being understood that by "area" of doctoral research something broader is envisioned than a list of texts immediately pertinent to the "topic" of the dissertation. In keeping with the prevalent conception of German studies, at least one of the exam lists ought to have a substantive interdisciplinary component; this might include integrating a particular historical span of literary production with an adjacent and related area, such as visual culture, music, religion, cultural anthropology, literary or critical theory, media studies, philosophy, linguistics, or political theory.

The preliminary examination has both a written and an oral component. The written portion of the exam is a take-home, open-book exam, consisting of two substantial questions, one on each field, given every other day. Students are given 24 hours per question and are expected to write for each question an original essay of roughly 15 pages on the assigned topic. Students are encouraged to make use of all available technology and of any materials, resources, databases, etc., they would normally consult while doing research. The oral portion of the exam, with questions from all examiners, lasts about 90 minutes and generally takes place no more than two weeks after the written exam.

Dissertation Overview

A successful German studies Ph.D. dissertation is expected to be a mature and competent piece of writing, embodying the results of significant and original research, and it must constitute a significant contribution to the field of German studies.

Following the preliminary exam in their third year of study, students are generally expected to complete their dissertation chapter review during their fourth year of study and to defend their dissertation by the end of the fifth year.

Once a student has begun work on the dissertation, the Annual Plan of Study requirement is replaced by a requirement that the student produce a dissertation abstract. This abstract is to be updated on an annual basis and, once it has been approved by the dissertation advisor, turned in by the deadline for the Annual Plan of Study.

Dissertation Chapter and Prospectus Review

In consultation with their advisor, students develop a dissertation project. Students submit to the dissertation review committee a chapter of 30 to 45 pages, a seven-to-ten page overview of the dissertation, and a comprehensive bibliography. The oral review lasts approximately 90 minutes.

Dissertation Defense

When the student and the primary advisor are satisfied that a defensible draft is complete, they will offer it to the members of the committee for final approval and set a date for the final examination (also known as the dissertation defense). The defense will usually be held as soon after submission of the final draft as is practical and in keeping with University and Graduate School requirements.

Following each UNC faculty member's name is a section number that students should use when registering for independent studies, reading, research, and thesis and dissertation courses with that particular professor.  For registrations at UNC for thesis or dissertation courses with a Duke professor, students should choose section (1).

Carolina–Duke Graduate Program in German Studies

carolina-duke-grad.german.duke.edu

Professors

Ruth von Bernuth (10) (UNC), Medieval and Early Modern, Jewish Studies, Yiddish, Popular Culture, Disability Studies
Eric Downing (2) (UNC), 18th-to-20th-Century Narrative Fiction, Literary Theory, Realism and Aestheticism
Stefani Engelstein (1) (Duke), Intellectual and Cultural History, Jewish Studies, 18th- and 19th-Century Literature
Clayton Koelb (20) (UNC), Modern Literature (Thomas Mann, Franz Kafka), Literary Theory, Philosophy and Aesthetics, Comparative Literature
Richard Langston (7) (UNC), Postwar and Contemporary Literature, Avant-Garde Studies, Popular Culture and Literature, Literary and Cultural Theory
Jakob Norberg (1) (Duke), Postwar Literature and Society, 20th-Century Austrian Literature, Political Theory
Thomas Pfau (1) (Duke), 19th-Century Literature, Literary History and Criticism, English Literature
Henry Pickford (1) (Duke), Aesthetics, Literary and Critical Theory, Philosophy and Literature, Aesthetics
David Pike (8) (UNC), 20th-Century Literature, East German and Soviet Culture and Politics
Paul T. Roberge (9) (UNC), Historical Linguistics, Older Germanic Dialects, Comparative Germanic Grammar, Pidgins and Creoles, Afrikaans, Language, Ethnicity, and Politics

Associate Professors

Kata Gellen (1) (Duke), German Modernism, Austrian Literature, German-Jewish Studies
Priscilla Layne (16) (UNC), 20th- and 21st-Century Literature, Film and Music, (Post)Subculture Studies, Multiculturalism, Afro-German History and Culture, and Gender Studies
Inga Pollman (5) (UNC), Film and Media Theory and History, Early Cinema, German Cinema, Film and Science, Aesthetic and Critical Theory
Gabriel Trop (11) (UNC), 18th-Century Studies, Poetry and Poetics, Romanticism, Philosophy and Aesthetics

Assistant Professors

Adi Nester (29) (UNC), Jewish Studies, 19th and 20th Century, Political Theory, Philosophy, Theories of Language and Translation, Music and Sound,
Aleksandra Prica (15) (UNC), Medieval and Early Modern German Literature and Culture, Media Studies, Literature and the Bible, Literature and Knowledge, Poetology and Hermeneutics, Historical Processes, Aesthetics of Form
Sarah Pourciau (38) (Duke), Aesthetics, Theology, Music and Sound, Literary and Critical Theory, Philosophy and Literature, Science and Culture, 19th and 20th Century, Modernism

Teaching Assistant Professors

Joseph Rockelmann (UNC)
Christina M. Weiler (UNC)

Lecturers

Kristen Dolan (Duke)
Susanne Freytag (Duke)

April Henry (Duke)

Adjunct Assistant Professors

Heidi Madden (Duke), 19th Century, Comparative Literature and Theory
Dan Thornton (25) (UNC), Postwar German and Austrian Literature, Expressionism, Neue Sachlichkeit, Golden Age and 20th-Century Dutch Literature, Holocaust Studies, Jewish Literature in the Diaspora

Professors Emeriti

Siegfried Mews (UNC)
Michael Morton (Duke)
Ann Marie Rasmussen (Duke)
James Rolleston (Duke)

Professor of the Practice Emerita

Ingeborg Walther (Duke)

Associate Professors Emeriti

Walter K. Francke (UNC)
Norman Keul (Duke)

Assistant Professor Emerita

Helga Bessent (Duke)

Slavic and East European Languages and Literatures

Professor

Hana Pichova (4), Czech Literature

Associate Professors

Radislav Lapushin (14), Russian Literature
Stanislav Shvabrin (22), Russian Literature

Assistant Professor

Eliza Rose (12), Polish and East-Central European Literature

Teaching Associate Professor

Eleonora Magomedova (6), Russian Language

Teaching Assistant Professors

Natalia Chernysheva (UNC), Russian Language
Meredith Doubleday (UNC), Russian Language
Adnan Džumhur (UNC), Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian Languages
Matt McGarry (UNC), Russian Language

Professors Emeriti

Madeline G. Levine
Peter Sherwood

Associate Professors Emeriti

Lawrence Feinberg
Christopher R. Putney
Ivana Vuletic

German (GERM)

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate-level Courses

GERM 400.  Advanced German Grammar.  3 Credits.  

Review of basic and advanced grammatical structures. Course strengthens application of grammar in context for undergraduate and graduate students. Graduate students also work with grammar issues encountered in the foreign language classroom.

Rules & Requirements  
Requisites: Prerequisite, GERM 204; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 450.  Nietzsche, Hesse, and Mann.  3 Credits.  

Explores Nietzsche on literature, and Hesse's and Mann's literary thematization of Nietzsche's philosophy. Emphasis on conceptions of character, myth, music, and language, and Nietzsche's cultural and moral critique and its reevaluation in light of the 20th century political crises. Taught in English; some readings in German for qualified students.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: LA, NA.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
IDEAs in Action General Education logoGERM 466.  Language Remains: German-Jewish Dialogues and Beyond.  3 Credits.  

This course explores German-Jewish writing before and after the Holocaust, focusing on the social and political position of Jews in German-speaking countries and how those are manifest in their relation to the German language.

Rules & Requirements  
IDEAs in Action General Education logo IDEAs in Action Gen Ed: FC-AESTH or FC-POWER.
Making Connections Gen Ed: LA, NA.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Same as: JWST 466.  
GERM 479.  What is a Medium? German Media Theory from Aesthetics to Cultural Techniques.  3 Credits.  

This seminar provides students across the humanities with an overview of the historical and cultural relevance of German media theories. We will discuss the distinction between "art" and "medium", the role of technology and techniques, as well as the interaction of media theory and practice with politics. Films with English subtitles; readings and discussions in English.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: VP, CI.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Same as: CMPL 479.  
IDEAs in Action General Education logoGERM 493.  Internship in German.  3 Credits.  

This course enables a student to earn a maximum of three credit hours for a faculty-supervised internship directly related to the study of German literature or culture, or that uses the German language in day-to-day conduct of business in a German-speaking environment.

Rules & Requirements  
IDEAs in Action General Education logo IDEAs in Action Gen Ed: HI-INTERN.
Making Connections Gen Ed: EE- Academic Internship, NA.  
Requisites: Prerequisite, GERM 303.  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit. 6 total credits. 2 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 6.  
GERM 500.  History of the German Language.  3 Credits.  

Development of phonology and morphosyntax from ancient times to present. Political, social, and literary forces influencing the language.

Rules & Requirements  
Requisites: Prerequisites, GERM 302 and 303; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 501.  Structure of German.  3 Credits.  

LING 101 recommended for undergraduates. Introduction to formal analysis of German grammar (phonology, morphophonemics, prosodics, morphology, syntax) within the framework of generative grammar.

Rules & Requirements  
Requisites: Prerequisites, GERM 302 and 303; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Same as: LING 567.  
GERM 502.  Middle High German.  3 Credits.  

Introduction to medieval German language, literature, and culture. Readings in English, German and Middle High German. Discussions in German.

Rules & Requirements  
Requisites: Prerequisite, GERM 303; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 505.  Early New High German.  3 Credits.  

Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Reading and linguistic analysis of Early New High German texts, with study of phonology, morphology, and syntax. On demand.

Rules & Requirements  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 508.  Old High German.  3 Credits.  

Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Reading and linguistic analysis of Old High German texts, with study of phonology, morphology, and syntax; comparison of the various dialects with other older dialects of Germanic. On demand.

Rules & Requirements  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 511.  Old Saxon.  3 Credits.  

Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Reading and linguistic study of biblical texts (Heliand, Genesis) in Old Saxon, with study of phonology, morphology, and syntax; comparison with Old English, Old High German, and other Germanic dialects. On demand.

Rules & Requirements  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 514.  Old Norse I (Old Icelandic).  3 Credits.  

Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Reading and linguistic analysis of Old Norse (Old Icelandic) texts, with study of phonology, morphology, and syntax; comparison with other older dialects of Germanic. On demand.

Rules & Requirements  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 515.  Old Norse II (Old Icelandic).  3 Credits.  

Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Continuation of GERM 514. On demand.

Rules & Requirements  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 517.  Gothic.  3 Credits.  

Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Reading and linguistic analysis of Gothic biblical texts, with study of phonology, morphology, and syntax; comparison with other older dialects of Germanic. On demand.

Rules & Requirements  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 520.  Stylistics: Theory and Practice.  3 Credits.  

LING 101 recommended for undergraduates. Study of stylistic theories and practices in literature and linguistics, analysis of a large variety of texts, written exercises, training in the use of stylistic devices.

Rules & Requirements  
Requisites: Prerequisites, GERM 302 and 303; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 521.  Variation in German.  3 Credits.  

LING 101 recommended for undergraduates. Major topics in sociolinguistics: development of the German language, traditional dialects, variation in contemporary speech, German as a minority language (Alsace, Belgium), German outside of Germany (Austria, Switzerland, Luxemburg, Liechtenstein).

Rules & Requirements  
Requisites: Prerequisites, GERM 302 and 303; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 545.  Problems in Germanic Linguistics.  3 Credits.  

LING 101 recommended for undergraduates. Special problems will be selected for intensive investigation. Subject matter of the course will be adapted to the particular interests of the students and instructor.

Rules & Requirements  
Requisites: Prerequisites, GERM 302 and 303; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites.  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit. 6 total credits. 2 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 590.  Topics in Germanic Linguistics.  3 Credits.  

LING 101 recommended for undergraduates.

Rules & Requirements  
Requisites: Prerequisites, GERM 302 and 303; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites.  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit. 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 601.  Elementary German for Graduate Students.  3 Credits.  

Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. With GERM 602, a two-semester sequence designed as preparation for the reading knowledge examination for higher degrees in the humanities, social sciences, physical sciences, etc.

Rules & Requirements  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 602.  Elementary German for Graduate Students, Continued.  3 Credits.  

Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Continuation of GERM 601.

Rules & Requirements  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 605.  Comparative Germanic Grammar.  3 Credits.  

Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. LING 101 recommended for undergraduates. Analysis of phonological, morphological, and syntactic development from Indo-European to the older stages of Germanic dialects.

Rules & Requirements  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 614.  Foundations in German Studies I.  3 Credits.  

First part of a three-semester sequence offering students a comprehensive, text-based survey of German literary history from the High Middle Ages to the present. The course introduces students to medieval German language, literature, and culture. Readings in English, German and Middle High German. Discussions in German. Permission of the instructor for undergraduates.

Rules & Requirements  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 615.  Foundations in German Studies II.  3 Credits.  

Second part of a three-semester sequence offering students a comprehensive, text-based survey of German literary history from the High Middle Ages to the present. Permission of the instructor for undergraduates.

Rules & Requirements  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 616.  Foundations in German Studies III.  3 Credits.  

Third part of a three-semester sequence offering students a comprehensive, text-based survey of German literary history from the High Middle Ages to the present. Permission of the instructor for undergraduates.

Rules & Requirements  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 625.  Early Modern Literature.  3 Credits.  

Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. German literature of the 15th, 16th, and 17th centuries. Close readings, lectures, and discussions of representative texts.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 630.  18th-Century Literature.  3 Credits.  

Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Literature in the Age of Enlightenment. Close readings, lectures, and discussions of representative texts.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 640.  Early 19th-Century Literature.  3 Credits.  

Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Literature of the Romantic period. Close readings, lectures, and discussions of representative texts.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 645.  Later 19th-Century Literature.  3 Credits.  

Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Literature of Realism, Naturalism, and related movements. Close readings, lectures, and discussions of representative texts.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 650.  Early 20th-Century Literature.  3 Credits.  

Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Major figures of the period from the turn of the century to World War II. Close readings, lectures, and discussions of representative texts.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 655.  Later 20th-Century Literature.  3 Credits.  

Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Literature since World War II in both the Federal Republic and the former GDR. Close readings, lectures, and discussions of representative texts.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 685.  Early 21st-Century German Literature.  3 Credits.  

Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Literature since German unification in 1989. Close readings, lectures, and discussions of representative texts.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  

Graduate-level Courses

GERM 700.  Foreign Language Pedagogy: Theories and Practice.  3 Credits.  

For prospective teachers of German. Required of all teaching assistants.

Rules & Requirements  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 703.  Advanced Topics in Foreign Language Pedagogy.  3 Credits.  

This seminar provides experienced teaching assistants the opportunity to revisit the fundamentals in foreign language pedagogy while exploring in greater depth advanced issues like content-based instruction, technology, and supervising.

Rules & Requirements  
Requisites: Prerequisite, GERM 700.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 706.  Topics in Literary Theory.  3 Credits.  

Literary and cultural theory with a German accent. Topics may include hermeneutics, Frankfurt School, reception theory, psychoanalysis, new historicism, and other strains of contemporary theory relevant to German studies.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 820.  Topics in Medieval Literature.  3 Credits.  

Selected topics in medieval literature. Topics will vary by offering.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 825.  Topics in Early Modern Literature.  3 Credits.  

Selected topics in early modern literature. Topics will vary by offering.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 830.  Topics in 18th-Century Literature.  3 Credits.  

Selected topics in 18th-century literature. Topics will vary by offering.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 840.  Topics in Early 19th-Century Literature.  3 Credits.  

Selected topics in early 19th-century literature. Topics will vary by offering.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 845.  Topics in Later 19th-Century Literature.  3 Credits.  

Selected topics in later 19th-century literature. Topics will vary by offering.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 850.  Topics in Early 20th-Century Literature.  3 Credits.  

Selected topics in early 20th-century literature. Topics will vary by offering.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 855.  Topics in Later 20th-Century Literature.  3 Credits.  

Selected topics in later 20th-century literature. Topics will vary by offering.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 860.  Topics in Aesthetics and Criticism.  3 Credits.  

Selected topics in aesthetics and criticism. Topics will vary by offering.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 861.  Topics in Literary Genres.  3 Credits.  

Explores issues associated with various literary genres across various literary periods.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 865.  Topics in German Cultural Studies.  3 Credits.  

Selected topics in German cultural studies. Topics will vary by offering.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 870.  Topics in Gender Studies.  3 Credits.  

Selected topics in gender studies. Topics will vary by offering.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 875.  Topics in German Jewish Studies.  3 Credits.  

Selected topics in German Jewish studies. Topics will vary by offering.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 880.  Topics in German Cinema.  3 Credits.  

Selected topics in German cinema. Topics will vary by offering.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 885.  Topics in 21st Century German Literature.  3 Credits.  

Selected topics in 21st-century literature. Topics will vary by offering.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 889.  Special Topics in German Literature, Culture, Film: Compact Seminar.  3 Credits.  

An intensive seven-week seminar to be offered exclusively during fall semesters, this graduate-level course is taught by a distinguished short-term scholar with expertise in German literature, film or culture who is visiting from a German-speaking country.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit. 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 896.  Independent Readings.  1-12 Credits.  

Permission of the instructor and the director of graduate studies. Special readings and research in a selected field or topic outside the scope of current course offerings.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 899.  Graduate Study Abroad Credit.  3-9 Credits.  

Registration course credit for students who are registered abroad as part of a graduate foreign exchange program.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit.   
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 980.  Seminar in German Literature.  3 Credits.  
Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 985.  Seminar in German Linguistics.  3 Credits.  
Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
GERM 992.  Master's (Non-Thesis).  3 Credits.  

Students enrolled in the Carolina-Duke Graduate Program in German Studies will enroll in this course during the semester in which they undergo the Writing Proficiency Review.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit.   
GERM 994.  Doctoral Research and Dissertation.  3 Credits.  
Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit.   

Duke German Studies Courses

(Please check the Duke University course catalog.)

Dutch (DTCH)

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate-level Courses

DTCH 402.  Elementary Dutch.  3 Credits.  

The first course in the Dutch language sequence, DTCH 402 is a rapid introduction to modern Dutch with emphasis on all fundamental components of communication. Completion of DTCH 402 fulfills level 2 of a foreign language.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: FL.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 1 & 2 combined.  
IDEAs in Action General Education logoDTCH 403.  Intermediate Dutch.  3 Credits.  

The second course in the Dutch language sequence, DTCH 403 focuses on increased skills in speaking, listening, reading, global comprehension, and communication. Emphasis on reading and discussion of longer texts. Completion of DTCH 403 fulfills level 3 of a foreign language.

Rules & Requirements  
IDEAs in Action General Education logo IDEAs in Action Gen Ed: GLBL-LANG.
Making Connections Gen Ed: FL.  
Requisites: Prerequisite, DTCH 402; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 3.  
DTCH 404.  Advanced Intermediate Dutch.  3 Credits.  

This third Dutch course completes the language sequence. DTCH 404 aims to increase proficiency in language skills (reading, speaking, writing) and is constructed around a series of themes meant to introduce students to Dutch society, culture, and history. Completion of DTCH 404 fulfills level 4 of a foreign language.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: FL.  
Requisites: Prerequisite, DTCH 403; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 4.  
DTCH 405.  Topics in Dutch Culture: A Literary Survey.  3 Credits.  

Ability to read and speak Dutch at intermediate to advanced level recommended. Introduction to Dutch literature from Middle Ages to the present. Survey of topics in Dutch culture.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: LA, NA.  
Requisites: Prerequisite, DTCH 404; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 5.  

Graduate-level Courses

DTCH 896.  Independent Readings in Dutch.  1-9 Credits.  

Special readings and research in a selected field or topic under the direction of a faculty member.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  

Slavic (SLAV)

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate-level Courses

SLAV 464.  Imagined Jews: Jewish Themes in Polish and Russian Literature.  3 Credits.  

Explores the fictional representation of Jewish life in Russia and Poland by Russian, Polish, and Jewish authors from the 19th century to the present. Taught in English; some foreign language readings for qualified students.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: LA, BN.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Same as: JWST 464.  
SLAV 469.  Coming to America: The Slavic Immigrant Experience in Literature.  3 Credits.  

Fictional and autobiographical expressions of the Slavic and East European immigrant experience in the 20th century. Readings include Russian, Polish, Jewish, and Czech authors from early 1900s to present. Taught in English; some foreign language readings for qualified students.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: LA, GL.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Same as: JWST 469.  
SLAV 470.  20th-Century Russian and Polish Theater.  3 Credits.  

A comparative survey of the major trends in 20th-century Russian and Polish dramaturgy and theatrical production, with attention to aesthetic, professional, and political connections between the two. Taught in English; some foreign language readings for qualified students.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: LA, BN.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
SLAV 490.  Topics in Slavic Culture.  3 Credits.  

Comparative study of topics in non-Russian Slavic literatures and culture not covered in any other course. Specific topics will vary and will be announced in advance. Taught in English; some foreign language readings for qualified students.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
SLAV 580.  East European Literary Criticism.  3 Credits.  

Survey of 20th-century Slavic literary criticism. Russian formalists, Bakhtin and his circle, Czech structuralists, Soviet semiotics. Emphasis on influence of Slavic criticism on development of Western literary criticism.

Rules & Requirements  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  

Graduate-level Courses

SLAV 796.  Reading Course.  1-12 Credits.  

Permission of the instructor. Special readings and research in a selected field or topic under the direction of a faculty member.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
SLAV 994.  Doctoral Research and Dissertation.  3 Credits.  
Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit.   

Russian (RUSS)

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate-level Courses

RUSS 409.  Intermediate-to-Advanced Russian Communication, Conversation, and Composition in Context I.  3 Credits.  

Intermediate-to-advanced communication, conversation, composition, phonetics, and grammar in contemporary cultural context. Meets the needs of learners looking to expand their practical knowledge of contemporary standard Russian in the context of present-day culture, while developing active applied skills pertaining to comprehension, production of, and communication in Russian.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: BN.  
Requisites: Prerequisite, RUSS 204; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 5.  
IDEAs in Action General Education logoRUSS 410.  Intermediate-to-Advanced Russian Communication, Conversation, and Composition in Context II.  3 Credits.  

Hones skills necessary for advanced communication, conversation, and composition. Presents phonetics and grammar in contemporary cultural context. Learners expand their practical knowledge of contemporary standard Russian in the context of present-day culture, while developing applied skills pertaining to comprehension, production of, and communication in Russian actively using authentic cultural materials.

Rules & Requirements  
IDEAs in Action General Education logo IDEAs in Action Gen Ed: FC-GLOBAL.
Making Connections Gen Ed: BN.  
Requisites: Prerequisite, RUSS 409; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 6.  
RUSS 411.  Advanced Communication, Conversation, and Composition in Contemporary Standard Russian I.  3 Credits.  

Develops and maintains advanced skills for speaking, writing, listening, and reading in contemporary standard Russian in a variety of communicative situations. Assists advanced learners in solving a wide range of communicative tasks with the aid of unadapted authentic cultural materials.

Rules & Requirements  
Requisites: Prerequisite, RUSS 410; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 6.  
RUSS 412.  Advanced Communication, Conversation, and Composition in Contemporary Standard Russian II.  3 Credits.  

Prepares advanced learners of contemporary standard Russian for communication with educated native speakers of the language in the area of their professional competence. Furthers interactive skills for speaking, writing, listening, and reading in a variety of communicative situations pertaining to the learners' professional expertise.

Rules & Requirements  
Requisites: Prerequisite, RUSS 411; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 6.  
RUSS 415.  Introduction to Russian Literature.  3 Credits.  

Reading and discussion of selected authors in Russian aimed at improving reading skill and preparing the student for higher level work in Russian literature. Readings and class discussions in Russian. Course previously offered as RUSS 250.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: LA, BN.  
Requisites: Prerequisite, RUSS 410; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 6.  
IDEAs in Action General Education logoRUSS 445.  19th Century Russian Literature and Culture.  3 Credits.  

A survey of the major novels and stories of 19th century Russian fiction, which have entered the canon of world classics and redefined the idea of literature. Taught in English; some readings in Russian for qualified students.

Rules & Requirements  
IDEAs in Action General Education logo IDEAs in Action Gen Ed: FC-AESTH or FC-PAST.
Making Connections Gen Ed: LA, BN.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
RUSS 450.  The Russian Absurd: Text, Stage, Screen.  3 Credits.  

Examines "The Absurd" in Russian literature and culture as it developed from 19th century to the present. Through works by important Russian writers and representative films students encounter facets of "The Russian Absurd" viewed as literary, cultural, and social phenomena. Taught in English; some readings in Russian for qualified students.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: LA, BN.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
IDEAs in Action General Education logoRUSS 455.  20th-Century Russian Literature and Culture.  3 Credits.  

As Russia became a laboratory for sociopolitical experiments of global significance, its culture reflected on the most spectacular of its aspirations and failures. Course surveys 20th-century literary, musical and cinematic artifacts that emerged to affect the world profoundly. Taught in English; some readings in Russian for qualified students.

Rules & Requirements  
IDEAs in Action General Education logo IDEAs in Action Gen Ed: FC-KNOWING.
Making Connections Gen Ed: LA, BN.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
RUSS 462.  Russian Poetry of the 19th Century.  3 Credits.  

Readings and lecture on 19th-century Russian poetry. Taught in English; some readings in Russian for qualified students.

Rules & Requirements  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
RUSS 463.  Russian Drama: From Classicism to Modernism.  3 Credits.  

Survey of Russian drama as a literary and theatrical phenomenon from the end of the 18th to the beginning of the 20th century. Taught in English; some readings in Russian for qualified students.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: LA, BN.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
IDEAs in Action General Education logoRUSS 464.  Dostoevsky.  3 Credits.  

Study of major works of Dostoevsky and a survey of contemporary literary and cultural trends relevant to his creative career. Taught in English; some readings in Russian for qualified students.

Rules & Requirements  
IDEAs in Action General Education logo IDEAs in Action Gen Ed: FC-AESTH or FC-PAST.
Making Connections Gen Ed: LA, BN.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
IDEAs in Action General Education logoRUSS 465.  Chekhov.  3 Credits.  

Study of major works of Chekhov and survey of contemporary literary and cultural trends relevant to his creative career. Taught in English; some readings in Russian for qualified students.

Rules & Requirements  
IDEAs in Action General Education logo IDEAs in Action Gen Ed: FC-AESTH or FC-PAST.
Making Connections Gen Ed: LA, BN.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
RUSS 469.  Bulgakov.  3 Credits.  

Study of major works of Mikhail Bulgakov, including Master and Margarita, and a survey of contemporary Russian history and culture relevant to his creative career. Taught in English; some readings in Russian for qualified students.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: LA, BN.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
RUSS 471.  Gogol.  3 Credits.  

Study of major works of N. V. Gogol and a survey of contemporary authors and literary trends relevant to his creative career. Lectures and seminar discussions. Taught in English; some readings in Russian for qualified students.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: LA, BN.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
RUSS 475.  Literature of Russian Terrorism: Arson, Bombs, Mayhem.  3 Credits.  

Literary representations of Russian revolutionaries and terrorists in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Readings by Dostoevsky, Chernyshevsky, Bely, Joseph Conrad, and by some of the terrorists themselves. Taught in English; some readings in Russian for qualified students.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: LA, BN, CI.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Same as: PWAD 475.  
RUSS 477.  Wicked Desire: Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita, on Page and Screen.  3 Credits.  

Vladimir Nabokov's novel Lolita (1955) became a global phenomenon due to its unflinching portrayal of pedophilia. This course will delve deeper into the novel's moral complexity, its international context, and its reflection in mass culture, including movies by Stanley Kubrick (1962) and Adrian Lyne (1997). Taught in English; some readings in Russian for qualified students.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: LA, NA.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Same as: CMPL 477.  
RUSS 479.  Tolstoy.  3 Credits.  

Study of the major works of Tolstoy and a survey of contemporary authors and literary trends relevant to his creative career. Taught in English; some readings in Russian for qualified students.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: LA, BN.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
IDEAs in Action General Education logoRUSS 480.  Russian-Soviet Jewish Culture: Lofty Dreams and Stark Realities.  3 Credits.  

This course delves into the scintillating literary, visual, musical, and cinematic culture created by Jewish universalists seeking to build their new secular identity under the aegis of the Soviet Communist experiment in the aftermath of the 1917 Bolshevik coup. Surveys the works of Isaac Babel, Eduard Bagritsky, Marc Chagall, Sergey Eisenstein, Ilya Ehrenburg, Masha Gessen, Vasily Grossman, Osip Mandelshtam, and others. Taught in English; some readings in Russian for qualified students; films with English subtitles. Honors version available.

Rules & Requirements  
IDEAs in Action General Education logo IDEAs in Action Gen Ed: FC-GLOBAL or FC-PAST.
Making Connections Gen Ed: LA, BN.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Same as: JWST 480.  
IDEAs in Action General Education logoRUSS 486.  Exploration of Russian "Women's Prose" and Svetlana Alexievich (Nobel Prize in Literature 2015).  3 Credits.  

Using Alexievich as our beacon, we will explore the writers behind the term "Russian Women's Prose": Valeria Narbikova, Lyudmila Petrushevskaya, Tatyana Tolstaya, and Lyudmila Ulitskaya. The course will delve into gender identity and body politics as they manifest themselves in the literary texts of lasting aesthetic quality and social relevance. Taught in English; some readings in Russian for qualified students.

Rules & Requirements  
IDEAs in Action General Education logo IDEAs in Action Gen Ed: FC-AESTH or FC-GLOBAL.
Making Connections Gen Ed: LA, BN.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Same as: WGST 486, EURO 486.  
RUSS 490.  Topics in Russian Culture.  3 Credits.  

Study of topics in Russian literature and culture not currently covered in any other course. The specific topic will be announced in advance. Taught in English. Some readings in Russian for qualified students.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
RUSS 511.  Russian Mass Media I.  3 Credits.  

Module 1. Fifth-year Russian, intended to expand and master the knowledge of the language necessary for understanding deep ongoing changes in different spheres of Russian society.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: BN.  
Requisites: Prerequisites, RUSS 411 and 412; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 6.  
RUSS 512.  Russian Mass Media II.  3 Credits.  

Module 2. Fifth-year Russian, intended to expand and master the knowledge of the language necessary for understanding deep ongoing changes in different spheres of Russian society.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: BN.  
Requisites: Prerequisites, RUSS 411 and 412; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 6.  
RUSS 513.  Russian Culture in Transition I.  3 Credits.  

Fifth-year Russian, intended to expand knowledge of the language necessary for understanding social changes that are taking place in Russian society, in literature, art, culture, and everyday human mentality.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: LA, BN.  
Requisites: Prerequisite, RUSS 411; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 6.  
RUSS 514.  Russian Culture in Transition II.  3 Credits.  

RUSS 513 is not a prerequisite. Fifth-year Russian, continuing with the theme of RUSS 513 offered in the fall semester.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: LA, BN.  
Requisites: Prerequisite, RUSS 412; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 6.  
IDEAs in Action General Education logoRUSS 515.  Advanced Russian Communication, Composition and Grammar in the Professions I.  3 Credits.  

RUSS 515 provides advanced learners with opportunities to develop linguo-cultural skills necessary to practice their profession in Russian. While engaged in academic discourse in contemporary standard Russian, learners research topics in their academic majors, prepare and give presentations and lead discussions focusing on their areas of professional competence. In addition to student-centered segments, the course comprises instructor-led discussions of current affairs and academic subjects. Readings, viewing materials, and discussions in Russian.

Rules & Requirements  
IDEAs in Action General Education logo IDEAs in Action Gen Ed: RESEARCH, COMMBEYOND.
Making Connections Gen Ed: BN, EE- Mentored Research.  
Requisites: Prerequisites, RUSS 412 or permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
IDEAs in Action General Education logoRUSS 516.  Advanced Russian Communication, Composition and Grammar in the Professions II.  3 Credits.  

A continuation of RUSS 515, RUSS 516 develops and maintains the linguo-cultural skills of advanced-to-professional learners by preparing them for professional study-abroad experiences at Russophone institutions of higher learning. A seminar-style course with rotating instructors, it engages learners in contemplation, research, and discussion of subjects within the instructor's professional expertise. Readings, viewing materials, and discussions in Russian.

Rules & Requirements  
IDEAs in Action General Education logo IDEAs in Action Gen Ed: RESEARCH, COMMBEYOND.
Making Connections Gen Ed: BN, EE- Mentored Research.  
Requisites: Prerequisites, RUSS 515 or permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
RUSS 562.  Structure of Russian.  3 Credits.  

Examines Russian from the perspective of linguistic analysis. How do sounds, words, and sentences pattern in Russian? How do these compare with patterns in other languages? Also considers the influence of evidence from Russian on the development of linguistic theory.

Rules & Requirements  
Requisites: Prerequisite, LING 101 or RUSS 102; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Same as: LING 562.  

Graduate-level Courses

RUSS 790.  Teaching Methods and Materials.  1 Credits.  

For prospective teachers of Russian. Required of all teaching assistants.

Rules & Requirements  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  

Czech (CZCH)

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate-level Courses

CZCH 401.  Elementary Czech I.  3 Credits.  

Proficiency-based instruction at the elementary level that develops the four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, writing). In addition to mastering basic vocabulary and grammar, students will communicate in Czech about everyday topics.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: FL.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 1.  
CZCH 402.  Elementary Czech II.  3 Credits.  

Continuation of the proficiency-based instruction in CZCH 401. Course emphasizes speaking, listening, reading, writing in a cultural context. Students enhance their basic vocabulary and grammar and will regularly communicate in Czech about everyday topics.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: FL.  
Requisites: Prerequisite, CZCH 401; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 2.  
IDEAs in Action General Education logoCZCH 403.  Intermediate Czech I.  3 Credits.  

Continuation of proficiency-based instruction begun in Elementary Czech.

Rules & Requirements  
IDEAs in Action General Education logo IDEAs in Action Gen Ed: GLBL-LANG.
Making Connections Gen Ed: FL.  
Requisites: Prerequisite, CZCH 402; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 3.  
CZCH 404.  Intermediate Czech II.  3 Credits.  

Continuation of proficiency-based instruction begun in Elementary Czech.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: FL.  
Requisites: Prerequisite, CZCH 403; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 4.  
CZCH 405.  Advanced Czech I.  3 Credits.  

Advanced readings and discussion in Czech in humanities and social science topics.

Rules & Requirements  
Requisites: Prerequisite, CZCH 404; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 5.  
CZCH 406.  Advanced Czech II.  3 Credits.  

Advanced readings and discussion in Czech in humanities and social science topics, continued.

Rules & Requirements  
Requisites: Prerequisite, CZCH 405; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 6.  
CZCH 411.  Introduction to Czech Literature.  3 Credits.  

Introduction to Czech literature with an emphasis on 19th- and 20th-century prose. Taught in English. Some readings in Czech for qualified students.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: LA, BN.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
IDEAs in Action General Education logoCZCH 469.  Milan Kundera and World Literature.  3 Credits.  

This course traces Milan Kundera's literary path from his communist poetic youth to his present postmodern Francophilia. His work will be compared with those authors he considers his predecessors and influences in European literature. Taught in English. Some readings in Czech for qualified students.

Rules & Requirements  
IDEAs in Action General Education logo IDEAs in Action Gen Ed: FC-AESTH.
Making Connections Gen Ed: LA, BN.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Same as: CMPL 469.  
CZCH 490.  Topics in Czech Culture.  3 Credits.  

Study of topics in Czech and/or Slovak literature and culture not currently covered in any other course. The specific topic will be announced in advance. Taught in English. Some readings in Czech for qualified students.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  

Hungarian (HUNG)

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate-level Courses

HUNG 401.  Elementary Hungarian.  3 Credits.  

Pronunciation, structure of language, and reading in modern Hungarian.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: FL.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 1.  
HUNG 402.  Elementary Hungarian.  3 Credits.  

Pronunciation, structure of language, and reading in modern Hungarian, continued.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: FL.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 2.  
IDEAs in Action General Education logoHUNG 403.  Intermediate Hungarian Language.  3 Credits.  

Continuation of the proficiency-based instruction begun in Elementary Hungarian.

Rules & Requirements  
IDEAs in Action General Education logo IDEAs in Action Gen Ed: GLBL-LANG.
Making Connections Gen Ed: FL.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 3.  
HUNG 404.  Intermediate Hungarian Language.  3 Credits.  

Continuation of the proficiency-based instruction begun in Elementary Hungarian, continued.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: FL.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 4.  
HUNG 405.  Advanced Hungarian.  3 Credits.  

Advanced readings and discussion in Hungarian in humanities and social science topics.

Rules & Requirements  
Requisites: Prerequisite, HUNG 404; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 5.  
HUNG 406.  Advanced Hungarian.  3 Credits.  

Advanced readings and discussion in Hungarian in humanities and social science topics, continued.

Rules & Requirements  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 6.  
HUNG 407.  The Structure of Modern Hungarian.  3 Credits.  

Introduction to the phonology, morphology, and syntax of modern standard Hungarian, with emphasis on some of its distinctive typological features.

Rules & Requirements  
Requisites: Prerequisite, HUNG 401 or LING 101.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
HUNG 411.  Introduction to Hungarian Literature.  3 Credits.  

An introduction to Hungarian literature of the last five centuries through a selection of works in English translation, with supporting background materials including films (with English subtitles). Taught in English; some readings in Hungarian for qualified students.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: LA, BN.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
HUNG 490.  Topics in Hungarian Culture.  3 Credits.  

Study of topics in Hungarian literature and culture not currently covered in any other course. The specific topic will be announced in advance. Taught in English; some readings in Hungarian for qualified students.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  

Macedonian (MACD)

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate-level Courses

MACD 401.  Elementary Macedonian.  3 Credits.  

Pronunciation, structure of language, and reading in modern Macedonian.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: FL.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 1.  
MACD 402.  Elementary Macedonian.  3 Credits.  

Pronunciation, structure of language, and reading in modern Macedonian, continued.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: FL.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 2.  
IDEAs in Action General Education logoMACD 403.  Intermediate Macedonian.  3 Credits.  

Continuation of the proficiency-based instruction begun in Elementary Macedonian.

Rules & Requirements  
IDEAs in Action General Education logo IDEAs in Action Gen Ed: GLBL-LANG.
Making Connections Gen Ed: FL.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 3.  
MACD 404.  Intermediate Macedonian.  3 Credits.  

Continuation of the proficiency-based instruction begun in Elementary Macedonian, continued.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: FL.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 4.  
MACD 405.  Advanced Macedonian.  3 Credits.  

Advanced reading and discussion in Macedonian in humanities and social science topics.

Rules & Requirements  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 5.  
MACD 406.  Advanced Macedonian.  3 Credits.  

Advanced reading and discussion in Macedonian in humanities and social science topics, continued.

Rules & Requirements  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 6.  

Polish (PLSH)

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate-level Courses

PLSH 401.  Elementary Polish I.  3 Credits.  

Proficiency-based instruction at the elementary level that develops the four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, writing). In addition to mastering basic vocabulary and grammar, students will communicate in Polish about everyday topics.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: FL.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 1.  
PLSH 402.  Elementary Polish II.  3 Credits.  

Continuation of the proficiency-based instruction in PLSH 401. Course emphasizes speaking, listening, reading, writing in a cultural context. Students enhance their basic vocabulary and grammar and will regularly communicate in Polish about everyday topics.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: FL.  
Requisites: Prerequisite, PLSH 401; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 2.  
IDEAs in Action General Education logoPLSH 403.  Intermediate Polish I.  3 Credits.  

Continuation of the proficiency-based instruction begun in elementary Polish.

Rules & Requirements  
IDEAs in Action General Education logo IDEAs in Action Gen Ed: GLBL-LANG.
Making Connections Gen Ed: FL.  
Requisites: Prerequisite, PLSH 402; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 3.  
PLSH 404.  Intermediate Polish II.  3 Credits.  

Continuation of the proficiency-based instruction begun in elementary Polish, continued.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: FL.  
Requisites: Prerequisite, PLSH 403; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 4.  
PLSH 405.  Advanced Polish I.  3 Credits.  

Advanced readings and discussion in Polish on humanities and social science topics.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: BN.  
Requisites: Prerequisite, PLSH 404; permission of Instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 5.  
PLSH 406.  Advanced Polish II.  3 Credits.  

Advanced readings and discussion in Polish on humanities and social science topics, continued.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: BN.  
Requisites: Prerequisite, PLSH 405; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 6.  
PLSH 411.  19th-Century Polish Literature and Culture.  3 Credits.  

An overview of the major literary, cultural and social movements in 19th-century Poland (Romanticism, Positivism and Young Poland) as they relate to Europe more broadly. All readings and discussions in English; readings available in Polish for qualified students.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: LA, BN.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
PLSH 412.  From Communism to Capitalism: 20th- and 21st-Century Polish Literature and Culture.  3 Credits.  

An overview of the literary and cultural movements in 20th and 21st century Poland as they relate to major historical changes of the century (World War I and World War II, Communism, Post-communism, accession to the European Union). All readings and discussions in English; readings available in Polish for qualified students.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: LA, BN.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Same as: JWST 412.  
PLSH 490.  Topics in Polish Culture.  3 Credits.  

Study of topics in Polish literature and culture not currently covered in any other course. The specific topic will be announced in advance. Taught in English. Some readings in Polish for qualified students.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  

Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian (BCS)

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate-level Courses

BCS 401.  Elementary Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian Language I.  3 Credits.  

Proficiency-based instruction at the elementary level that develops the four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, writing). In addition to mastering basic vocabulary and grammar, students will communicate in the target language about everyday topics. Previously offered as SECR 401.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: FL.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 1.  
BCS 402.  Elementary Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian Language II.  3 Credits.  

Continuation of the proficiency-based instruction in BCS 401. Course emphasizes speaking, listening, reading, writing in a cultural context. Students enhance their basic vocabulary and grammar and will regularly communicate in the target language about everyday topics. Previously offered as SECR 402.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: FL.  
Requisites: Prerequisite, BCS 401; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 2.  
IDEAs in Action General Education logoBCS 403.  Intermediate Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian Language I.  3 Credits.  

Continuation of the proficiency-based instruction started in Elementary Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian. Previously offered as SECR 403.

Rules & Requirements  
IDEAs in Action General Education logo IDEAs in Action Gen Ed: GLBL-LANG.
Making Connections Gen Ed: FL.  
Requisites: Prerequisite, BCS 402; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 3.  
BCS 404.  Intermediate Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian Language II.  3 Credits.  

Continuation of the proficiency-based instruction started in BCS 403. Previously offered as SECR 404.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: FL.  
Requisites: Prerequisite, BCS 403; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 4.  
BCS 405.  Advanced Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian Language I.  3 Credits.  

Advanced readings and discussion in Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian on humanities and social science topics. Previously offered as SECR 405.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: BN.  
Requisites: Prerequisite, BCS 404; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 5.  
BCS 406.  Advanced Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian Language II.  3 Credits.  

Advanced readings and discussion in Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian on humanities and social science topics. Continuation of BCS 405. Previously offered as SECR 406.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: BN.  
Requisites: Prerequisite, BCS 405; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
Global Language: Level 6.  
BCS 411.  Introduction to South Slavic Literatures and Cultures.  3 Credits.  

Introduction to South Slavic literatures and cultures with an emphasis on 19th- through 21st-century prose. Taught in English. Some readings in target language for qualified students. Previously offered as SECR 411.

Rules & Requirements  
Making Connections Gen Ed: LA, BN.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  
BCS 490.  Topics in South Slavic Cultures.  3 Credits.  

Study of topics in Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian, and other South Slavic literatures and cultures not currently covered in any other course. The specific topic will be announced in advance. Taught in English. Some readings in target language for qualified students. Previously offered as SECR 490.

Rules & Requirements  
Repeat Rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.  
Grading Status: Letter grade.  

Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures

Visit Program Website

426 Dey Hall, CB# 3160

(919) 966-1642

Chair

Richard Langston

relangst@email.unc.edu

UNC Director of Graduate Studies

Gabriel Trop

gtrop@email.unc.edu

Duke Director of Graduate Studies

Stefani Engelstein

stefani.engelstein@duke.edu

Administrative Manager

Valerie Bernhardt

gsll@unc.edu