Curriculum in Global Studies (GRAD)

Curriculum in Global Studies

http://globalstudies.unc.edu

301 Pittsboro Street, FedEx Global Education Center, Suite 2200

Milada Vachudova, Chair

vachudov@email.unc.edu

Erica Johnson, Director of Graduate Studies

ericaj@email.unc.edu

Zach Ward, Student Services Specialist

wzw59@email.unc.edu

Diana Devereaux, Business Manager

dmchase@email.unc.edu

The global studies master of arts is a two-year interdisciplinary “applied research” degree that combines scholarly rigor and practical skills. Students enrolled in the program will focus on analysis of transregional and transnational themes, events, and processes that affect states and societies around the world, such as transnational social movements; the diffusion of, and clashes over, political and social norms; and implications of global trade, investment, production, and employment patterns. The program’s courses focus on issues with contemporary global significance and policy relevance. Global studies is an emerging discipline, and UNC–Chapel Hill is at the forefront of defining the field and evolving methodological approaches.

The educational objectives of the program are to:

  • Highlight issues of current and emerging global significance;
  • Prepare current and future leaders with knowledge and conceptual skills needed for careers in international work; and
  • Provide an education that trains individuals to understand and respond to the nature of global change.

Facebook: facebook.com/UNCGlobalStudies

Twitter: twitter.com/UNC_GlobalCurr

Requirements for the Global Studies M.A. Degree

The Curriculum in Global Studies offers graduate work for the degree of master of arts in global studies. Students pursue a concentration in one of the following three thematic areas: global politics, institutions, and societies; global economy; or global migration and labor rights. A concentration in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies (REEES) is also available, but it has distinct degree requirements (see below).

To earn the M.A. in global studies, the student must fulfill the following curriculum requirements:

GLBL 700Introduction to Research and Theory in Global Studies3
GLBL 701Political Economy of Development3
GLBL 702Global Politics, Institutions, and Societies3
GLBL 703Global Migration and Labor Rights3
GLBL 992Master's (Non-Thesis)3
An appropriate research methods course
At least six courses in a concentration determined in consultation with the director of graduate studies18
Completion and defense of a research or policy paper
Total Hours33

Further information may be obtained on the program's Web site or from Dr. Erica Johnson, Director of Graduate Studies, CB# 3263, FedEx Global Education Center, 301 Pittsboro St., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3263. Telephone: (919) 962-0663. Fax: (919) 962-8485. E-mail: ericaj@email.unc.edu.

Requirements for the REEES Concentration in the Global Studies M.A. Degree

The global studies M.A. program also offers a concentration in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies (REEES). The student must fulfill the following requirements:

Select one of the following:
Four semester courses in a Slavic or East European language (Czech, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, or Serbo-Croatian)
Research methods course appropriate to the student's concentration
HIST 783Introduction to Russian, Eurasian, and East European History3
GLBL 700Introduction to Research and Theory in Global Studies3
GLBL 730Identities and Transitions3
GLBL 993Master's Research and Thesis3
Completion and defense of a research or policy paper
Total Hours12

Further information may be obtained on the program's Web site or from Dr. Erica Johnson, Director of Graduate Studies, CB# 3263, FedEx Global Education Center, 301 Pittsboro St., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3263. Telephone: (919) 962-0663. Fax: (919) 962-8485. Email: ericaj@email.unc.edu.

Professors

Liesbet Hooghe, Political Science
Georges Nzongola-Ntalaja, African, African American, and Diaspora Studies
John Pickles, Geography
Andrew Reynolds, Political Science
Graeme Robertson, Political Science

Associate Professors

Inger Brodey, English and Comparative Literature
Chad Bryant, History
Renée Alexander Craft, Communication
Mark Driscoll, Asian Studies
Banu Gökariksel, Geography
Nina Martin, Geography
Christopher Nelson, Anthropology
Elizabeth Olson, Geography
Eunice Sahle, African, African American, and Diaspora Studies
Mark Sorensen, Anthropology
Meenu Tewari, City and Regional Planning
Michael Tsin, History
Milada A. Vachudova, Political Science

Assistant Professors

Fadi Bardawil, Asian Studies
Hannah Gill, Institute for the Study of the Americas
Lucy Martin, Political Science
Townsend Middleton, Anthropology
Michael Morgan, History
Brigitte Seim, Public Policy
Iqbal Singh Sevea, History
Niklaus Steiner, Center for Global Initiatives
Angela Stuesse, Anthropology

Senior Lecturers

Erica Johnson, Global Studies
Michal Osterweil, Global Studies
Jonathan Weiler, Global Studies

GLBL

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate-level Courses

GLBL 401. Paradigms of Development and Social Change. 3 Credits.

This course aims to develop a critical perspective on development -- understood as a cultural logic and a discreet set of practices and policies -- so that we can better contribute to positive social change. Through course material and service learning, students develop an understanding of the relationship between development projects and emancipatory frameworks. Honors version available
Gen Ed: EE-Service Learning.
Grading status: Letter grade.

GLBL 405. Comparative Political Economics of Development. 3 Credits.

Political, economic dynamics of selected countries in Asia, Latin America, Caribbean, and Africa.
Grading status: Letter grade.

GLBL 406. Transitions to Democracy. 3 Credits.

Transitions to liberal democratic political structures in Latin America, Asia, Africa, and the former Soviet bloc.
Grading status: Letter grade.

GLBL 413. Capitalism and Climate in the Anthropocene, 1500-present. 3 Credits.

This course will focus on the relation of capitalism and anthropogenic climate change from the 16th to 21st centuries. We will feature an interdisciplinary lens (e.g., philosophy, feminist geography, cultural anthropology) that will analyze how the anthropocentric subject of the enlightenment separated itself from its natural environment.
Requisites: Prerequisite, GLBL 210.
Gen Ed: BN.
Grading status: Letter grade.

GLBL 450. Social Change in Times of Crisis: Knowledge, Action, and Ontology. 3 Credits.

Examines dominant, alternative, and emergent narratives of change and the future from around the world. Takes as a premise that we live in a period of multidimensional crises characterized by uncertainty and conflict about how to pursue sustainable economic, ecological, political, social, and cultural projects.
Grading status: Letter grade.

GLBL 470. Globalization and Childhood. 3 Credits.

Surveys major issues in the interdisciplinary study of globalization and the lives of children. Course themes include children's rights, migration, child labor, exploitation, transnational adoption, inequality, the growth of consumerism and consumption, and children in crisis and conflict situations.
Grading status: Letter grade.

GLBL 481. NGO Politics. 3 Credits.

This course will investigate how nongovernmental organizations emerge, how they structure their organizations, how they function, and how they influence public policy. Honors version available
Grading status: Letter grade.

GLBL 482. Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics and Institutions. 3 Credits.

This course is an introduction to the history and contemporary politics of the post-Soviet region and explores topics of religious, ethnic, and identity politics; international influences; and civil society and social movements. Honors version available
Grading status: Letter grade.

GLBL 483. Comparative Health Systems. 3 Credits.

This course provides students with an understanding of the origins and comparative performance of a range of international healthcare systems. Honors version available
Grading status: Letter grade.

GLBL 484. History and Politics of Central Asia. 3 Credits.

This course is an introduction of the history, politics, and societies of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. The class explores the foundations and conditions of change in the modern history of these societies and investigates how these issues influence contemporary politics.
Grading status: Letter grade.

GLBL 485. Comparative Development. 3 Credits.

This course is an APPLES service-learning course whose goal is to integrate real-world experience working with development-oriented organizations, theoretical discussions about the origins and evolution of development thinking, and exposure to the challenges facing practitioners of development, in some of its many substantive and geographical contexts.
Gen Ed: EE-Service Learning.
Grading status: Letter grade.

GLBL 486. Sports and Globalization. 3 Credits.

This course explores some of the relationships between sports and globalization and will delve into sports as an important social and cultural practice within larger social, cultural, and political forces shaping studies of globalization. Honors version available
Grading status: Letter grade.

GLBL 487. Social Movements: Rethinking Globalization. 3 Credits.

This course explores the history, objectives, and manifestations of global social movements.
Grading status: Letter grade.

GLBL 488. International Migration and Citizenship. 3 Credits.

This class explores the moral, economic, political, and cultural dimensions of movements across international borders.
Gen Ed: GL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

GLBL 489. Paradigms of Development and Social Change. 3 Credits.

By deliberately juxtaposing questions of global development with an investigation of approaches in community organizing locally--both through course material and service-learning assignments--the course encourages students to develop a more critical understanding of the relationship between development projects and emancipatory frameworks.
Gen Ed: BN, EE-Service Learning.
Grading status: Letter grade.

GLBL 490. Current Topics. 3 Credits.

Current topics in international and area studies. Topics vary by semester.
Grading status: Letter grade.

GLBL 491H. Major Controversies in Human Rights. 3 Credits.

A forum for exploring conceptual and practical problems related to the emergence of a global human rights regime after World War II. The course analyzes relevant arguments, and students will consider whether it is possible to construct a coherent, workable, universally accepted system for articulating and enforcing human rights norms.
Grading status: Letter grade.

GLBL 492H. Global Food Films. 3 Credits.

Thinking about one of our most basic human needs illuminates aspects of our own everyday lives, such as our relationship to nature, other cultures, and to history, as well as our general assumptions about humanity. Students will study films that explore cross-cultural differences in the social and philosophical understandings of what it is to be human.
Grading status: Letter grade.

GLBL 560. Human Rights, Ethics, and Global Issues. 3 Credits.

This seminar examines the political, economic and intellectual developments that led to the emergence of human rights as a global phenomenon historically and in the current phase of globalization. Also engages with debates concerning the role of human rights as an ethical philosophy in thinking through global issues.
Gen Ed: GL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

GLBL 691H. Honors in Global Studies. 3 Credits.

Permission of the instructor. Preparation for writing the honors thesis.
Gen Ed: EE-Mentored Research.
Grading status: Letter grade.

GLBL 692H. Honors in Global Studies. 3 Credits.

Permission of the instructor. Completion of the honors thesis and an oral examination of the thesis.
Gen Ed: EE-Mentored Research.
Grading status: Letter grade.

Graduate-level Courses

GLBL 700. Introduction to Research and Theory in Global Studies. 3 Credits.

Global studies examines world systems, transnational processes, and global-local interactions from a multi-disciplinary perspective. This course will introduce students to current interdisciplinary theoretical approaches to global studies and examine the primary topics of contemporary research relating to the rise of a complex but increasingly integrated world society.

GLBL 701. Political Economy of Development. 3 Credits.

Presents foundational theories, concepts, and empirical research regarding the political economy of development. In content, course will define this topic broadly, from considering the political and economic dynamics of the international community (e.g., aid) as well as the intersection of economics and politics in comparative perspective (e.g., democratization and development).

GLBL 702. Global Politics, Institutions, and Societies. 3 Credits.

This course will address global governance and global public policy; interactions among states, international organizations, businesses, social movements, and NGOs. It addresses the diffusion and promotion of democracy and other norms and the interactions between political institutions and social cleavages. Students with this concentration must take one appropriate methodology class.

GLBL 703. Global Migration and Labor Rights. 3 Credits.

The course will focus on the interactions of migration, labor rights, human rights, economics, health disparities, and cross-border tensions. Students with this concentration will also take at least one appropriate disciplinary methodology class.

GLBL 730. Identities and Transitions. 3 Credits.

Capstone course for the REEES concentration in the Global Studies MA program. Interdisciplinary course focusing on the variety of problems encountered by the societies of East European countries and successor states of the former Soviet Union in their transition from communism to democracy.
Same as: POLI 746.

GLBL 789. Teaching Languages Across the Curriculum. 3 Credits.

Focuses on the pedagogy and practice of teaching Languages Across the Curriculum, a national movement to integrate foreign language use into interdisciplinary college courses outside the traditional language/literature departments.

GLBL 890. Special Topics in Global Studies. 1-3 Credits.

Instructors and topics vary from semester to semester.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 9 total credits. 3 total completions.

GLBL 893. Global Studies Internship and Field Experience. 1-9 Credits.

Students may earn academic credit toward degree requirements for completion of an internship or other field experience. Internship and work load must be approved by the Director of Graduate Studies. Specific guidelines must be followed earn academic credit.

GLBL 896. Independent Reading and Research. 3 Credits.

Permission of the instructor. Reading and research on special topics in global studies.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 6 total credits. 2 total completions.

GLBL 992. Master's (Non-Thesis). 3 Credits.

Master's thesis substitute paper; permission of the instructor required.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit.

GLBL 993. Master's Research and Thesis. 3-6 Credits.