GENETICS AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (GNET)

GNET 425. Human Genetics. 3 Credits.

Pedigree analysis, inheritance of complex traits, DNA damage and repair, human genome organization, DNA fingerprinting, the genes of hereditary diseases, chromosomal aberrations, cancer and oncogenes, immunogenetics and tissue transplants. Three lecture hours a week.
Requisites: Prerequisite, BIOL 202; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: BIOL 425.

GNET 621. Principles of Genetic Analysis I. 3 Credits.

Prerequisite for undergraduates, BIOL 202. Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Genetic principles of genetic analysis in prokaryotes and lower eukaryotes.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: BIOL 621.

GNET 622. Principles of Genetic Analysis II. 4 Credits.

Principles of genetic analysis in higher eukaryotes; genomics.
Requisites: Prerequisite, BIOL 621.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: BIOL 622.

GNET 623. Developmental Genetics Seminar. 1 Credit.

Permission of the instructor. Presentations of current research or relevant papers from the literature on development by students will be followed by open forum discussion of relevant points, and critique of presentation skills. Two hours per week.
Grading status: Letter grade.

GNET 624. Developmental Genetics. 3 Credits.

Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Genetic and molecular control of plant and animal development. Extensive reading from primary literature.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: BIOL 624.

GNET 625. Seminar in Genetics. 2 Credits.

Permission of the instructor for undergraduates. Current and significant problems in genetics. May be repeated for credit.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 6 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: BIOL 625.

GNET 631. Advanced Molecular Biology I. 3 Credits.

Required preparation for undergraduates, at least one undergraduate course in both biochemistry and genetics. DNA structure, function, and interactions in prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems, including chromosome structure, replication, recombination, repair, and genome fluidity. Three lecture hours a week.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: BIOC 631, BIOL 631, MCRO 631.

GNET 632. Advanced Molecular Biology II. 3 Credits.

Required preparation for undergraduates, at least one undergraduate course in both biochemistry and genetics. The purpose of this course is to provide historical, basic, and current information about the flow and regulation of genetic information from DNA to RNA in a variety of biological systems. Three lecture hours a week.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: BIOC 632, BIOL 632, MCRO 632.

GNET 635. Clinical and Counseling Aspects of Human Genetics. 3 Credits.

Topics in clinical genetics including pedigree analysis, counseling/ethical issues, genetic testing, screening, and issues in human research. Taught in a small group format. Active student participation is expected.
Requisites: Prerequisite, BIOL 425 or GNET 634; Permission of the instructor.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: BIOL 529.

GNET 636. Basic Elements of Probability and Statistical Inference I. 4 Credits.

Required preparation, two semesters of calculus (such as MATH 231, 232). Fundamentals of probability; discrete and continuous distributions; functions of random variables; descriptive statistics; fundamentals of statistical inference, including estimation and hypothesis testing.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: BIOS 550.

GNET 645. Quantitative Genetics of Complex Traits. 1 Credit.

Students will learn about various topics that form the basis for understanding quantitative genetics of complex traits with biomedical and agricultural relevance. The ultimate goal of quantitative genetics in this postgenomic era is prediction of phenotype from genotype, namely deducing the molecular basis for genetic trait variation.
Requisites: Prerequisite, GNET 621.
Grading status: Letter grade.

GNET 646. Principles and Experimental Approaches of Mammalian Genetics. 1 Credit.

This course will focus on the laboratory mouse as a model organism to learn fundamental genetic concepts and understand how state-of-the-art experimental approaches are being used to elucidate gene function and the genetic architecture of biological traits.
Grading status: Letter grade.

GNET 647. Human Genetics and Genomics. 1 Credit.

The course covers principles and modern approaches of human genetics and genomics, including human genetic variation, linkage, genome-wide association analysis, sequencing for variant discovery in monogenic and complex diseases, regulatory variation, the molecular basis of human disease, and functional validation of disease variants.
Grading status: Letter grade.

GNET 655. Issues in Human Genetics. 1 Credit.

This course will provide an overview of methods in human genetics during the critical reading of selected literature and work of speakers that will present in the Friday Seminar Series.
Grading status: Letter grade.

GNET 675. Computational Genetics. 1 Credit.

A course on systems genetics focused on student participation and the development of targeted multidisciplinary responses to genetic questions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

GNET 680. Modeling Human Diseases in Mice. 1 Credit.

Permission of the instructor. This course will provide an overview of the use of the mouse as an experimental model for determining factors, both genetic and environmental, that contribute to human diseases. One seminar hour a week.
Grading status: Letter grade.

GNET 701. Genetic Lecture Series. 1 Credit.

Open to genetics students only. Diverse but current topics in all aspects of genetics. Relates new techniques and current research of notables in the field of genetics.

GNET 702. Student Seminars. 1 Credit.

Required of all candidates for the degree in genetics. A course to provide public lecture experience to advanced genetics students. Students present personal research seminars based on their individual dissertation projects. Lectures are privately critiqued by fellow students and genetics faculty.

GNET 703. Student Seminars. 1 Credit.

Required of all candidates for the degree in genetics. A course to provide public lecture experience to advanced genetics students. Students present personal research seminars based on their individual dissertation projects. Lectures are privately critiqued by fellow students and genetics faculty.

GNET 742. Introduction to UNIX and Perl Programming for biomedical data analysis. 1 Credit.

This module will introduce UNIX and Perl programming. It is mainly targeted towards biomedical scientists who would be able to use Perl to analyze, transform, and manage large datasets.

GNET 743. Introductory Statistical Analysis in R for Biomedical Scientists. 1 Credit.

This module will introduce the data analysis environment R and use it to illustrate basic concepts in data manipulation, plotting of complex data, and basic statistical modeling. Class examples will be general and will aim to build familiarity and confidence with R and data analysis.

GNET 744. Biological Sequence Analysis, Protein-Structure, and Genome-Wide Data. 2 Credits.

This module provides an introduction to basic protein structure/function analyses combining sequence informatics and macromolecular structure. In the second half the focus will switch to analysis of genome-wide datasets and methods used for the analysis of such "big data.

GNET 749. Practical RNA-Seq. 2 Credits.

This course is designed to familiarize students with everything needed to run an RNA-Seq experiment. There will be minimal emphasis on theory and heavy focus on practical aspects. There are no formal prerequisites required for this course and no prior experience with UNIX or the command line interface is expected.
Same as: PHCO 749.

GNET 750. Genomics of Complex Human Disease. 2 Credits.

Human complex diseases are major focus in human genomics. They have important genetic components, but inheritance is probabilistic and not deterministic. This graduate seminar will cover the main approaches (genome-wide association, next-generation sequencing, and structural variation in case-control and pedigree studies) and current knowledge in the main disease areas.

GNET 801. Cell Cycle Regulation and Cancer. 3 Credits.

This journal club-style discussion course will focus on molecular events that regulate normal cell cycle progression, and on how deregulation of the cell cycle leads to cancer. Classes will follow the development of the cell cycle field chronologically, learning how current concepts and paradigms have evolved through scientific inquiry.
Same as: PATH 801.

GNET 850. Training in Genetic Teaching. 3 Credits.

Required preparation, two courses in genetics. Permission of the instructor. Principles of genetic pedagogy. Students are responsible for assistance in teaching genetics and work under the supervision of the faculty, with whom they have regular discussion of methods, content, and evaluation of performance. (Throughout the year.) Staff.

GNET 865. Advanced Nutritional Biochemistry: Nutrigenetics and Nutrigenomics. 2 Credits.

Permission of the instructor. Course focuses on nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics with an emphasis on the genetic and dietary interactions predisposing one to increased risk of disease.
Same as: NUTR 865.

GNET 905. Research in Genetics. 1-15 Credits.

May be repeated for credit.
Same as: BIOL 921.

GNET 993. Master's Research and Thesis. 3 Credits.

Permission of the department. Students are not accepted directly into the M.S. program.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit.

GNET 994. Doctoral Research and Dissertation. 3 Credits.