Department of Sociology

Department of Sociology

http://www.unc.edu/depts/soc

155 Hamilton Hall, CB# 3210

(919) 962-1007

Kenneth Andrews, Chair

kta1@email.unc.edu

Leah Elms, Student Services Manager

leahelms@email.unc.edu

Introduction

The Department of Sociology is the primary home for two majors—sociology and management and society—and a minor in social and economic justice.

The undergraduate major in sociology at UNC–Chapel Hill provides students with theoretical and methodological tools, and substantive insights for understanding human social life and institutions. The department’s faculty is particularly strong in the areas of social inequality, marriage and family, health and medical sociology, work and the economy, religion, formal organizations, sex and gender, social movements, population and human ecology, social networks, education, and political sociology. Course themes range widely from the theoretical to the applied and incorporate a broad array of methodological approaches including comparative/historical, participant observation and interviewing, survey data collection and statistical analysis.

Management and society is an interdisciplinary major that focuses on the institutional context and inner workings of organizations. It prepares students for a variety of positions in private or public-sector organizations. Additionally, many students find the curriculum to be excellent preparation for a variety of business-oriented graduate and professional degree programs.

Advising

All majors and minors have a primary academic advisor in Steele Building. Students are strongly encouraged to meet regularly with their advisor and review their Tar Heel Tracker each semester. The department’s director of undergraduate studies and assistant director meet with current, transfer, and prospective majors by appointment (see contact information on the program page of the catalog). Departmental academic advising is particularly important for those students who are double majors and those who may be considering going on to graduate school. Further information on courses, undergraduate research opportunities, writing an honors thesis, careers, and graduate schools is available on the department’s Web site.

Graduate School and Career Opportunities

Sociologists are employed by research institutes, public health and welfare organizations, social work agencies, private businesses, law firms, international agencies, medical centers, educational institutions, advertising firms, survey and polling organizations, and the criminal justice system. Others work in politics and government and in community and social justice organizing.

A major in sociology also prepares students for law, medical, or business school and for graduate degree programs in social work, education, public policy, religious ministry, mass communications, public health, nonprofit administration, and international affairs. Of course the sociology major also prepares interested undergraduates for graduate studies in sociology, should they choose to continue in the field to become researchers or teachers in high schools, two- or four-year colleges, or research universities. Students interested in pursuing graduate studies in sociology after college may, with the instructor’s permission, enroll in graduate-level courses at UNC–Chapel Hill.

A major in management and society prepares students for virtually any aspect of a business career that does not involve highly specialized training (such as finance and accounting). Employers are interested in students who can think on their feet, communicate effectively, write well, and make sense of the social and economic changes occurring in their industry. Management and society majors are educated in each of these skills.

Graduates with B.A. degrees with majors in management and society are especially suited for entry-level positions in any aspect of human resource management, industry, or public sector organizations. Among recent graduates who responded to a placement office survey, the largest number were employed in sales; management or management training positions with at least some supervisory or personnel-related responsibilities ranked second. Other graduates are working in customer service, purchasing, and marketing research, and several hold positions in the public sector.

Professors

Howard E. Aldrich, Kenneth (Andy) Andrews, Kenneth A. Bollen, Barbara Entwisle, Guang Guo, Jacqueline Hagan, Kathleen M. Harris, Arne L. Kalleberg, Sherryl Kleinman, Charles Kurzman, François Nielsen, Andrew J. Perrin, Karolyn Tyson, Yang (Claire) Yang.

Associate Professors

Yong Cai, Neal Caren, Ted Mouw, Lisa Pearce.

Assistant Professors

Mosi Ifatunji, Anthony Perez, Liana Richardson, Kate Weisshaar.

Affiliated Faculty

John D. Kasarda (Kenan–Flagler Business School).

Adjunct Professors

Gail Henderson, James H. Johnson Jr., Robert F. Miles, John D. Stephens.

Research Professors

Glen H. Elder, Ronald R. Rindfuss, Paul Voss.

Adjunct Associate Professors

Thurston Domina, Douglas L. Lauen, Zeynep Tufecki, Catherine Zimmer.

Senior Lecturer

Anne S. Hastings.

Lecturer

Paul Biemer.

Professors Emeriti

Judith R. Blau, Richard Cramer, Victor W. Marshall, Anthony R. Oberschall, John Shelton Reed, Richard L. Simpson, Peter R. Uhlenberg

Subjects in this department include: Management and Society (MNGT) and Sociology (SOCI)

MNGT–Management and Society

Undergraduate-level Courses

MNGT 120. Introduction to Interpersonal and Organizational Communication. 3 Credits.

An introduction to communication theory, research, and practice in a variety of interpersonal and organizational contexts. This course examines the role of communication in both personal and professional relationships. Honors version available
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: COMM 120.

MNGT 131. Social Relations in the Workplace. 3 Credits.

Meaning and content of work in modern industrial society. Preparation for work; autonomy and control; inequality; consequences for health, safety, and family life.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: SOCI 131.

MNGT 223. Small Group Communication. 3 Credits.

Permission of the instructor for nonmajors. Introduction to the theory and practice of communication in the small group setting. Topics may include group development, conformity and deviation, gender, problem solving, and power and leadership.
Requisites: Prerequisite, COMM 120.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: COMM 223.

MNGT 310. Microeconomics: Theory and Applications. 3 Credits.

Analysis of the ways in which consumers and business firms interact in a market economy. Students may not receive credit for both ECON 310 and 410.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ECON 310.

MNGT 325. Introduction to Organizational Communication. 3 Credits.

Permission of the instructor for nonmajors. The course explores the historical and theoretical developments in the research and practice of organizational communication. Honors version available
Requisites: Prerequisite, COMM 120.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: COMM 325.

MNGT 330. Economic History of the United States. 3 Credits.

Main features of the American economy: colonial times to the present. Students may not receive credit for both ECON 330 and ECON 430.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ECON 330.

MNGT 345. Public Policy Toward Business. 3 Credits.

Industry structure and its relation to performance; market imperfections; description and analysis of antitrust and regulation. Students may not receive credit for both ECON 345 and ECON 445.
Requisites: Prerequisite, ECON 310 or 410.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ECON 345.

MNGT 364. History of American Business. 3 Credits.

A survey of the rise and development of the major financial, commercial, manufacturing, and transportation enterprises that transformed the United States from an agricultural into a leading industrial nation.
Gen Ed: HS, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: HIST 364.

MNGT 365. The Worker and American Life. 3 Credits.

From the experience of colonial artisans to contemporary factory and office workers, organized and unorganized, this course examines the effect of the industrial revolution on the American social and political landscape.
Gen Ed: HS, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: HIST 365.

MNGT 380. The Economics of Labor Relations. 3 Credits.

An economic analysis of workplace issues, including worker quits, layoffs and unemployment, discrimination and affirmative action, and the setting of pay, fringe benefits, and working conditions. Students may not receive credit for both ECON 380 and ECON 480.
Requisites: Prerequisite, ECON 310 or 410.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ECON 380.

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate-level Courses

MNGT 410. Formal Organizations and Bureaucracy. 3 Credits.

Varieties of organizational forms, their structures and processes; creation, persistence, transformation, and demise; role of organizations in contemporary society.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: SOCI 410.

MNGT 412. Social Stratification. 3 Credits.

Analysis of social structure and stratification in terms of class, status, prestige, and rank. Attention to social roles of elites, professionals, the middle class, and the working class and to comparative topics.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: SOCI 412.

MNGT 415. Economy and Society. 3 Credits.

Examination of the structure and operation of institutions where economy and society intersect and interact, such as education, industrial organizations, on-the-job training, labor markets, and professional associations. Emphasis on the contemporary United States, with selected comparisons with Western Europe and Japan.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: SOCI 415.

MNGT 427. The Labor Force. 3 Credits.

Supply and characteristics of labor and of jobs, including industrial and occupation changes, education and mobility of labor, and changing demography of the workforce.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: SOCI 427.

MNGT 691H. Honors Fall Course. 3 Credits.

Directed independent research under the supervision of a faculty advisor.
Grading status: Letter grade.

MNGT 692H. Honors Spring Course. 3 Credits.

Preparation of an honors thesis and an oral examination on the thesis.
Requisites: Prerequisite, MNGT 691H.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI–Sociology

Undergraduate-level Courses

SOCI 50. First-Year Seminar: Religion in American Public Life. 3 Credits.

This course will engage philosophical and sociological questions in order to explore the key issues involved in the contentious question of the actual and proper role of religion in American public life.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 51. First-Year Seminar: Emotion and Social Life. 3 Credits.

The course will examine the social aspects of emotional experience including current debates among sociologists and psychologists about the social functions of emotions.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 52. First-Year Seminar: Social Inequality across Space and Time. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on social inequality in human societies by looking at social inequalities in different historical periods and geographical locations.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 53. First-Year Seminar: The Consequences of Welfare Reform and Prospects for the Future. 3 Credits.

This first-year seminar is designed to 1) research and document the consequences of welfare reform and 2) participate in the political debate over reauthorization of the welfare law.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 54. First-Year Seminar: Good Jobs, Bad Jobs, No Jobs: Work and Workers in 21st-Century America. 3 Credits.

The course examines the nature and meaning of work in America at the beginning of the 21st century.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 55. First-Year Seminar: Self, Society, and the Making of Reality. 3 Credits.

What does it mean to say that reality is "socially constructed"? How do people in different social groups develop shared perspectives? In exploring answers to these questions (and others) the course will also examine the self from a sociological perspective.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 56. First-Year Seminar: Citizenship. 3 Credits.

Citizenship takes on new meaning in a global context. This course examines current debates, examples of human rights charters, and students apply what they learn to sociological topics.
Gen Ed: SS, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 57. First-Year Seminar: Rationalization and the Changing Nature of Social Life in 21st-Century America. 3 Credits.

Fast food restaurants have become a model for everyday life. Some scholars even talk about the "McDonaldization" of the world. By that scholars mean a drive toward greater efficiency, predictability, calculability, and control by technologies in modern organizations. Sociologists call this process "rationalization," which will be examined in this course.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 58. First-Year Seminar: Globalization, Work, and Inequality. 3 Credits.

This course will present a comparative and multidisciplinary perspective on how globalization affects labor markets and inequality.
Gen Ed: SS, GL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 59. First-Year Seminar: The Advocacy Explosion: Social Movements in the Contemporary United States. 3 Credits.

This course investigates the origins, dynamics, and influence of social movements in American society. It examines why people join movements, how movements work, and the way that movements are able to affect broader changes in our society.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 60. First-Year Seminar: Sociology of the Islamic World. 3 Credits.

This course exposes students to the social, economic, political, and religious currents that have made the Islamic world one of the most important regions for global affairs, as well as one of the regions least understood in the United States.
Gen Ed: SS, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 61. FYS: Innovative, Information Technology, and the Sociology of Business in 21st-Century. 3 Credits.

This course investigates how innovations in information technology are transforming the nature of business and society in the United States. It also examines the history of work relationships in the United States in order to discover how information technology will change the role of employees and what it means to be a customer.
Gen Ed: SS, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 62. First-Year Seminar: Social Change and Changing Lives. 3 Credits.

Society shapes our lives and yet we seek to influence the direction of our biographies through personal effort (also called "agency"). This course examines the dynamic between society and agency, which becomes especially interesting in times of social change, when societies redefine the paths that lives can take.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 63. First-Year Seminar: Cooperation and Conflict. 3 Credits.

The course examines cooperation and conflict in settings where there is no state and legal system that enforces rules of conduct: early encounters of Europeans and non-Europeans; migrants and colonists in a wilderness, such as New England Puritans and Mormons in Utah; good Samaritans who rescue strangers despite risks.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 64. First-Year Seminar: Equality of Educational Opportunity Then and Now. 3 Credits.

Brown v. Board of Education centers on one of the most significant and controversial issues in American public education: equality of educational opportunity. This course examines race in America and its affect on public education before and after Brown. Topics include school segregation, curriculum tracking, and the black-white achievement gap.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 65. First-Year Seminar: Environment, Health, and Justice. 3 Credits.

This course will use the environmental justice movement as a window to explore the dynamics of social movements, health disparities, and social policy.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 66. First-Year Seminar: Citizenship and Society in the United States. 3 Credits.

Americans are taught that democracy and citizenship go hand in hand: being a good citizen may mean voting, writing letters, and taking other actions to "make one's voice heard." This course examines what citizenship has meant during the course of American history.
Gen Ed: SS, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 67. First-Year Seminar: America in the 1960s. 3 Credits.

The 1960s were a period of great social upheaval. The course will examine many aspects of American culture: how we organized racial and gender relations; how we expressed our morality through music, art, and film; how we thought about God and spirituality; and how we practiced politics, among others. It will also look at the roots of the 1960s in the events of the 1940s and 1950s and examine a few of the legacies.
Gen Ed: SS, CI, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 68. First-Year Seminar: Immigration in Contemporary America. 3 Credits.

This seminar compares and contrasts historical and contemporary immigration to the United States and then explores the development a migrant community in North Carolina. We will study why people migrate, how citizens respond to migration, how the federal government regulates migration, how local communities manage the settlement of its newcomers.
Gen Ed: SS, CI, GL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 69. First-Year Seminar: Human Societies and Genomics. 3 Credits.

Familiarity with basic genetics or a social science field is helpful. This course focuses on how advances in molecular genomics over the past decades benefit sociology and other social sciences.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 70. First-Year Seminar: Difficult Dialogues. 3 Credits.

Provides tools for comprehensive, frank, civil conversations on controversial topics.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 71. First-Year Seminar: The Pursuit of Happiness. 3 Credits.

Examines the nature, causes, and consequences of happiness from diverse social science perspectives. Addresses such questions as, What is happiness? Can we measure happiness? If so, how? Does money buy happiness? Does happiness vary among social groups, cultures, and nations? What is the role of happiness in formulating public policies? Honors version available
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 72. First-Year Seminar: Race and Ethnicity in the United States. 3 Credits.

In this seminar, students delve into the meaning and measurement of race in society, how it changes over time and space, and what it signals for the future of race/ethnic relations in the United States. Seminar activities include data collection and analysis and critical examination of race/ethnicity in popular culture.
Gen Ed: SS, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 89. First-Year Seminar: Special Topics. 3 Credits.

Special topics course. Content will vary each semester. Honors version available
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 6 total credits. 2 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 101. Sociological Perspectives. 3 Credits.

Introduction to sociology as a discipline that includes study of differences and equality, social structure and institutions, culture, social change, individuals and populations, and social psychology. Honors version available
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 111. Human Societies. 3 Credits.

Introduction to comparative sociology. The major types of society that have existed or now exist are analyzed, together with major patterns of social change.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 112. Social Interaction. 3 Credits.

The individual in society. An examination of how people conduct their interactions with others in different kinds of social relationships. Emphasis on the social psychological causes and consequences of such conduct.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 115. Regional Sociology of the South. 3 Credits.

Description and analysis of social aspects of the American South. Emphasis is on recent development and its effects on institutions and culture.
Gen Ed: SS, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 121. Population Problems. 3 Credits.

Social and economic causes of population structure and change. Illustrations drawn from developing countries and the less developed regions and sections of the United States.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 122. Race and Ethnic Relations. 3 Credits.

Examination of domination and subordination in general and in specific institutional areas (e.g., economy, polity) along racial and ethnic lines. Causes of changes in the levels of inequality and stratification are also studied.
Gen Ed: SS, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 123. Crime and Delinquency. 3 Credits.

The nature and extent of crime and delinquency; emphasis upon contemporary theories of their causation; examination of correctional programs.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 124. Sex and Gender in Society. 3 Credits.

Examination of the social differentiation between men and women. Attention to the extent, causes, and consequences of sexual inequality and to changes in sex roles and their impact on interpersonal relations.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: WGST 124.

SOCI 130. Family and Society. 3 Credits.

Comparative analysis of kinship systems and family relations. Courtship, marriage, and parent-child relations viewed within a life-cycle framework. Students may not receive credit for both SOCI 130 and SOCI 425.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 131. Social Relations in the Workplace. 3 Credits.

Meaning and content of work in modern industrial society. Preparation for work; autonomy and control; inequality; consequences for health, safety, and family life.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: MNGT 131.

SOCI 133. Sociology of Politics. 3 Credits.

Patterns of participation in political institutions, public policy, conflict within and between communities and other interest groups, the nature of citizenship in modern society, politics and social change.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 140. Historical Sociology of Christianity. 3 Credits.

Takes an historical sociology approach to the study of Christianity. Examines the social conditions that helped give rise to the early Christian movement, follows Christianity as it influences and is influenced by social forces at key points in its historical development, and considers important contemporary developments around the globe.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: RELI 234.

SOCI 165. Introduction to Aging. 1 Credit.

This course sensitizes students to the diversity of the aging population and the aging experience, recognizes the capacity of older adults for their contributions to society, and fosters intergenerational communication.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 172. Introduction to Population Health in the United States. 3 Credits.

This course aims to provide an introduction to the study of population health in the United States. Key goals include understanding the measurement and theoretical frameworks underlying the study of population health, understanding trends and disparities in U.S. population health, and understanding policy options to improve population health.
Gen Ed: SS, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 250. Sociological Theory. 3 Credits.

Required of sociology majors. A study of theoretical perspectives in sociology, their relation to contemporary social issues, and their roots in classical social thought. Students may not receive credit for both SOCI 250 and SOCI 253.
Gen Ed: PH.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 251. Research Methods. 3 Credits.

Required of sociology majors. Methods of data collection, with attention to problem selection, sources of information, choice of methods, and research design. Operationalization and measurement; sampling, construction of questionnaires, and interviewing; observation techniques; experimentation.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 252. Data Analysis. 3 Credits.

Required of sociology majors. Methods of data analysis: descriptive statistics, elements of probability, and inferential statistics and multivariate analysis to permit causal inference.
Gen Ed: QI.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 253. Sociological Theory - Experiential. 3 Credits.

A study of theoretical perspectives in sociology, their relation to contemporary social issues, and their roots in classical social thought, taught through experiential examples. Students may not receive credit for both SOCI 253 and SOCI 250.
Requisites: Prerequisite, SOCI 101; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.
Gen Ed: EE-Service Learning.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 260. Crisis and Change in Russia and Eastern Europe. 3 Credits.

Draws on historical, political, economic, and sociological perspectives to analyze social, cultural, and institutional change.
Gen Ed: SS, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: POLI 260, PWAD 260.

SOCI 273. Social and Economic Justice, Experiential Education. 3 Credits.

Covers theory and practice of social and economic justice, including analyses of racial, gender, sexual, class, national, and other forms of justice, the history of influential movements for justice, and strategies of contemporary struggles. This course has a 30-hour service-learning component. Students may not receive credit for both SOCI 273 and SOCI 274.
Gen Ed: PH, EE-Service Learning.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 274. Social and Economic Justice. 3 Credits.

Covers theory and practice of social and economic justice, including analyses of racial, gender, sexual, class, national, and other forms of justice, the history of influential movements for justice, and strategies of contemporary struggles. Students may not receive credit for both SOCI 273 and SOCI 274.
Gen Ed: PH.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 277. Societies and Genomics. 3 Credits.

The course examines how human genomic information can be incorporated into social sciences. Topics include twin studies; an introduction to basic principles of molecular genetics; evolutionary psychology; sex, gender, and genomics; ethical issues in genetic studies; and epigenetics.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 290. Special Topics in Sociology. 3 Credits.

Periodic offering of courses on developing topics in the field.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 301. American Colleges and Universities: Junior Transfer Seminar. 3 Credits.

This course examines American colleges and universities from several perspectives, ranging from the individual student's experience to the role of higher education in larger social systems. Students will compare the unique needs of these diverse institutions as well as the populations they serve. Does not count toward the sociology major.
Gen Ed: SS, EE-Field Work.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 390. Sociological Analysis: Special Topics. 3 Credits.

Examines selected topics from a sociological perspective. Course description for a particular semester is available in the department office.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 393. Independent Experiential Internship. 1-3 Credits.

Permission of the department. This course is an internship experience directly relevant to the student's academic progress in sociology and/or management and society. Pass/Fail only.
Gen Ed: EE-Academic Internship.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 6 total credits. 2 total completions.
Grading status: Pass/Fail.

SOCI 396. Independent Study and Reading. 1-6 Credits.

Permission of the director of undergraduate studies. Special reading and research in a selected field under the direction of a member of the department.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit. 12 total credits. 4 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate-level Courses

SOCI 410. Formal Organizations and Bureaucracy. 3 Credits.

Varieties of organizational forms, their structures and processes; creation, persistence, transformation, and demise; role of organizations in contemporary society.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: MNGT 410.

SOCI 411. Social Movements and Collective Behavior. 3 Credits.

Study of nonroutine collective actions such as demonstrations, strikes, riots, social movements, and revolutions, with an emphasis on recent and contemporary movements. Students may not receive credit for both SOCI 413 and SOCI 411.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: PWAD 411.

SOCI 412. Social Stratification. 3 Credits.

Analysis of social structure and stratification in terms of class, status, prestige, and rank. Attention to social roles of elites, professionals, the middle class, and the working class and to comparative topics.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: MNGT 412.

SOCI 413. Social Movements and Collective Behavior, Experiential. 3 Credits.

Study of nonroutine collective actions such as demonstrations, strikes, riots, social movements, and revolutions, with an emphasis on recent and contemporary movements. Substantial field work for experiential education. Students may not receive credit for both SOCI 413 and SOCI 411.
Gen Ed: SS, EE-Field Work.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 414. The City and Urbanization. 3 Credits.

The city as a social, spatial, and political-economic phenomenon in the modern world. Analysis of urban demographic trends, spatial characteristics and economic functions. Substantive topics include segregation, social turmoil, unemployment, fiscal problems, suburbanization, and urban public policy. Students may not receive credit for both SOCI 414 and SOCI 417.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 415. Economy and Society. 3 Credits.

Examination of the structure and operation of institutions where economy and society intersect and interact, such as education, industrial organizations, on-the-job training, labor markets, and professional associations. Emphasis on the contemporary United States, with selected comparisons with Western Europe and Japan.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: MNGT 415.

SOCI 416. Comparative Perspectives on Contemporary International Migration and Social Membership. 3-4 Credits.

This course provides a special focus on international migration and social membership/citizenship across a number of advanced industrial immigrant-receiving states.
Gen Ed: EE-Service Learning, GL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 417. The City and Urbanization, Experiential Education. 3 Credits.

The city as a social, spatial, and political-economic phenomenon in the modern world. Analysis of urban demographic trends, spatial characteristics, and economic functions. Substantive topics include segregation, social turmoil, unemployment, fiscal problems, suburbanization, and urban public policy. Students may not receive credit for both SOCI 414 and SOCI 417.
Gen Ed: SS, EE-Service Learning.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 418. Contemporary Chinese Society. 3 Credits.

Designed to help students read complex pictures of contemporary China and to understand how China's rise affected people's lives, both inside and outside of China, from a sociological perspective. The course does not assume any background in Chinese studies.
Gen Ed: BN.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 419. Sociology of the Islamic World. 3 Credits.

Investigates issues such as tradition and social change, religious authority and contestation, and state building and opposition in Muslim societies in the Middle East and around the world.
Gen Ed: SS, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 420. Political Sociology. 3 Credits.

Analysis of the reciprocal influences of state and social organizations upon each other; the social bases of political authority and stability, of revolution and counterrevolution.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 422. Sociology of Health and Mental Illness. 3 Credits.

Course examines uniqueness of the sociological perspective in understanding mental health and illness. It draws upon various fields to explain mental illness in as broad a social context as possible. Attention focuses on how social factors influence definitions and perceptions of illness.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 423. Sociology of Education, Experiential Education. 3 Credits.

An overview of theory and research on education and schooling, with an emphasis on inequalities in educational opportunities, education as a social institution, and the changing context of schools and schooling. Substantial field work for experiential education. Students may not receive credit for both SOCI 423 and SOCI 426.
Gen Ed: SS, EE-Service Learning.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 424. Law and Society. 3 Credits.

A sociological analysis of comparative legal systems, the role of law in social change and in shaping social behavior. Topics may include the legal profession, property distribution, and the role of law in achieving racial and sexual justice.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 425. Family and Society, Junior/Senior Section. 3 Credits.

A special version of SOCI 130 for juniors, seniors, and beginning graduate students. Students may not receive credit for both SOCI 425 and SOCI 130.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 426. Sociology of Education. 3 Credits.

An overview of theory and research on education and schooling, with an emphasis on inequalities in educational opportunities, education as a social institution, and the changing context of schools and schooling. Students may not receive credit for both SOCI 423 and SOCI 426.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 427. The Labor Force. 3 Credits.

Supply and characteristics of labor and of jobs, including industrial and occupation changes, education and mobility of labor, and changing demography of the workforce.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: MNGT 427.

SOCI 428. Sociology of Art. 3 Credits.

Connections between artworks, art theory, and social theory are examined. Approaches in the fine arts and the social sciences are examined.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 429. Religion and Society. 3 Credits.

Sociological analysis of group beliefs and practices, both traditionally religious and secular, through which fundamental life experiences are given coherence and meaning.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: RELI 429.

SOCI 431. Aging. 3 Credits.

The process of aging from birth to death, with a concentration on the later years of life, examined from a broad perspective. Topics include individual change over the life-course, the social context of aging, and the aging of American society.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 433. Immigration in Contemporary America. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to reasons why people migrate, how citizens respond to that migration, how the federal government regulates migration, and how local communities manage the settlement of newcomers. By the end of the course students should have a solid understanding of major debates in the study of immigration.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 442. Conflict and Bargaining. 3 Credits.

Conflict and conflict-resolution behavior. Applications to labor-management relations, family, sports, community politics, international relations.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: PWAD 442.

SOCI 444. Race, Class, and Gender. 3 Credits.

Conceptualizations of gender, race, and class and how, separately and in combination, they are interpreted by the wider society. Emphasis on how black and working-class women make sense of their experiences at work and within the family.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: WGST 444.

SOCI 445. Sociology of Emotions. 3 Credits.

The course examines how emotions are organized within social groupings and institutions. Differences in socialization by gender, ethnicity, social class, and age will be explored.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 450. Theory and Problems of Developing Societies. 3 Credits.

Theories concerning the development process (motivational vs. institutional economics vs. political and social development; similarity of sequential states and outcomes) will be related to policy problems facing the developing nations.
Gen Ed: SS, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 453. Social Change in Latin America. 3 Credits.

Introduction to Latin American ideologies and values; economic and demographic changes; major pressure groups (old elites, entrepreneurs, peasants and working classes, military and intellectuals); and relations with the United States.
Gen Ed: SS, BN.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 460. Contemporary Social Theory. 3 Credits.

Analysis of current problems in general social theory; action and structure, justice and equity, social change and reproduction. Contrast and evaluation of leading approaches to solutions.
Requisites: Prerequisite, SOCI 250.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 468. United States Poverty and Public Policy. 3 Credits.

This course examines issues of poverty and social policy, single-mother families, the welfare debate, and homelessness.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 469. Health and Society. 3 Credits.

The primary objective of the course is to explain how and why particular social arrangements affect the types and distribution of diseases, as well as the types of health promotion and disease prevention practices that societies promote.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 470. Human Rights. 3 Credits.

Human rights are inherent in the advance of peace, security, prosperity, and social equity. They are shared by the global community, yet require local embedding. Course includes a service-learning component.
Gen Ed: EE-Service Learning.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 481. Managing International Conflict. 3 Credits.

This course introduces the principles of international cooperation and conflict resolution; theories of how international agreements develop or break down; and the logic of mediation, arbitration, and negotiation.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 620. Aging and Cohort Analysis in Social and Epidemiologic Research: Models, Methods, and Innovations. 3 Credits.

Required preparation, basic statistics courses. This seminar introduces guidelines for conducting aging and cohort analysis in social and epidemiologic research in which time and change are concerns. Uses three common research designs with an emphasis on new analytic models and methods.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 691H. Senior Honors Research and Seminar. 3 Credits.

Permission of the department. SOCI 691H is required of senior honors candidates. Individual student research (under supervision of an advisor). Weekly seminar to discuss work on honors thesis, as well as special topics in sociology.
Gen Ed: CI, EE-Mentored Research.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 692H. Senior Honors Research and Seminar. 3 Credits.

Permission of the department. Individual student research under supervision of an advisor. Weekly seminar to discuss work on honors thesis as well as special topics in sociology.
Requisites: Prerequisite, SOCI 691H.
Gen Ed: CI, EE-Mentored Research.
Grading status: Letter grade.

SOCI 696. Undergraduate/Graduate Study in Sociology. 3-4 Credits.

Permission of the instructor. Graduate study in sociology for undergraduate students. Undergraduate students taking a 700- or 800-level course in sociology register via this course and complete all requirements for the associated graduate course.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.