Department of Biostatistics

Department of Biostatistics

www.sph.unc.edu/bios

3103 McGavran-Greenberg Hall, CB# 7429

(919) 966-7262

Michael R. Kosorok, Chair

Jane Monaco, Program Director

monaco@email.unc.edu

Introduction

The Department of Biostatistics in the Gillings School of Global Public Health was the first undergraduate program in the country to offer an undergraduate degree in biostatistics. The degree provides an excellent foundation for continued studies (primarily graduate school in biostatistics, epidemiology, or medical school) and a strong foundation for employment in the health care industry for highly qualified students interested in quantitative methods applied to public health and medicine.

Advising

The program director serves as the academic advisor for all biostatistics undergraduates. Undergraduate students are encouraged to meet regularly with the program director and review their Tar Heel Tracker each semester. In addition, they can also visit the Office of Student Services. Departmental academic advising is particularly important for those students who are considering proceeding to graduate school, double majoring, or pursuing the dual B.S.P.H.–M.S. degree. Further information may be obtained in the Academic Information Manual.

Facilities

The Department of Biostatistics has a student library, a student study room, and computer facilities for its students.

Graduate School and Career Opportunities

In recent years, the majority of undergraduate biostatistics students from this program have chosen to attend medical school or graduate school in biostatistics (or other closely related fields) following graduation. More than 65 percent of recent graduates have entered medical school or graduate programs (primarily biostatistics) immediately following graduation. Recent graduates are attending top-ranked medical schools at Johns Hopkins University, Vanderbilt University, University of Virginia, Duke University, and UNC–Chapel Hill. Biostatistics graduate programs where students have matriculated immediately following completion of this undergraduate program include the University of Washington–Seattle, Harvard, UNC–Chapel Hill, and the University of Michigan. Previous graduates who chose to seek employment have taken positions in the pharmaceutical industry, contract research organizations, and medical settings. Examples of employers of recent graduates include Duke Clinical Research Institute, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Rho, PPD, National Institutes of Environmental Health Science, and Research Triangle Institute. Traditionally, career opportunities have been outstanding for skilled biostatisticians.

Professors

Jianwen Cai, Ding-Geng Chen, Jason P. Fine, Amy H. Herring, Michael Hudgens, Joseph G. Ibrahim, Gary G. Koch, Michael R. Kosorok, Danyu Lin, Yufeng Liu, James Marron, Andrew Nobel, Bahjat Qaqish, Pranab K. Sen, Richard Smith, Chirayath M. Suchindran, Kinh-Nhue Truong, Donglin Zeng, Haibo Zhou, Hongtu Zhu, Fei Zou.

Associate Professors

Lloyd J. Edwards, Anastasia Ivanova, Yun Li.

Assistant Professors

Quefeng Li, Michael Love.

Research Professors

Richard E. Bilsborrow, John S. Preisser Jr., Paul W. Stewart.

Professor of the Practice

Sonia M. Davis.

Research Associate Professors

Eric Bair, Todd A. Schwartz, Xianming Tan.

Research Assistant Professors

Josephine Asefu-Adjai, J.L. Crandell, Fang-Cheng Lin, Matthew Psioda, Naim Rashid, Daniela Sotres-Alvarez, Mark Weaver, Di Wu.

Clinical Professor

David J. Couper.

Clinical Associate Professors

Robert Agans, Jane Monaco.

Clinical Assistant Professor

Annie Green Howard, Matthew Loop.

Research Instructor

Katherine J. Roggenkamp.

Adjunct Professors

Alan Karr, Herman Mitchell, Shyamal Peddada, Clarice Weinberg.

Adjunct Associate Professors

Georgy Bobashev, Rosalie Dominik, Brian Neelon, Maura E. Stokes, Wei Sun, William Valdar.

Adjunct Assistant Professors

Pei-Fe Kuan, Eric Laber, Jean Orelien, Sean Simpson, Michael Wu, Shanshan Zhao, Richard Zink.

Professors Emeriti

Lloyd E. Chambless, Clarence E. Davis, James E. Grizzle, Ronald W. Helms, Lawrence L. Kupper, Keith E. Muller, Dana E. Quade, Michael J. Symons, Craig D. Turnbull.

BIOS–Biostatistics

Undergraduate-level

BIOS 392. Undergraduate Internship. 1-3 Credits.

Academic credit for approved internship experience.
Gen Ed: EE-Academic Internship.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit. 6 total credits. 2 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

BIOS 396. Readings in Biostatistics. 1-12 Credits.

Directed readings or laboratory study. May be taken more than once. Two to six laboratory hours a week.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate-level

BIOS 500H. Introduction to Biostatistics. 3 Credits.

Access to SAS, Excel required. Permission of instructor for nonmajors. Introductory course in probability, data analysis, and statistical inference designed for B.S.P.H. biostatistics students. Topics include sampling, descriptive statistics, probability, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses, chi-square distribution, 2-way tables, power, sample size, ANOVA, non-parametric tests, correlation, regression, survival analysis.
Requisites: Prerequisite, MATH 231 and 232; corequisite, BIOS 511.
Grading status: Letter grade.

BIOS 511. Introduction to Statistical Computing and Data Management. 4 Credits.

Required preparation, previous or concurrent course in applied statistics. Permission of instructor for nonmajors. Introduction to use of computers to process and analyze data, concepts and techniques of research data management, and use of statistical programming packages and interpretation. Focus is on use of SAS for data management and reporting.
Grading status: Letter grade.

BIOS 540. Problems in Biostatistics. 1-15 Credits.

Arrangements to be made with the faculty in each case. A course for students of public health who wish to make a study of some special problem in the statistics of the life sciences and public health. Honors version available
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit. 15 total credits. 4 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

BIOS 545. Principles of Experimental Analysis. 3 Credits.

Permission of the instructor for nonmajors. Required preparation, basic familiarity with statistical software (preferably SAS able to do multiple linear regression) and introductory biostatistics, such as BIOS 600. Continuation of BIOS 600. Analysis of experimental and observational data, including multiple regression and analysis of variance and covariance.
Grading status: Letter grade.

BIOS 550. Basic Elements of Probability and Statistical Inference I. 4 Credits.

Required preparation, two semesters of calculus (such as MATH 231, 232). Fundamentals of probability; discrete and continuous distributions; functions of random variables; descriptive statistics; fundamentals of statistical inference, including estimation and hypothesis testing.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: GNET 636.

BIOS 600. Principles of Statistical Inference. 3 Credits.

Required preparation, knowledge of basic descriptive statistics. Major topics include elementary probability theory, probability distributions, estimation, tests of hypotheses, chi-squared procedures, regression, and correlation.
Grading status: Letter grade.

BIOS 610. Introductory Statistics for Laboratory Scientists. 2 Credits.

This course introduces the basic concepts and methods of statistics with emphasis on applications in the experimental biological sciences. Students should have a basic understanding of algebra and arithmetic. No previous background in probability or statistics is required, nor is experience with statistical computing.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: BBSP 610.

BIOS 660. Probability and Statistical Inference I. 3 Credits.

Required preparation, three semesters of calculus (such as MATH 231, 232, 233). Introduction to probability; discrete and continuous random variables; expectation theory; bivariate and multivariate distribution theory; regression and correlation; linear functions of random variables; theory of sampling; introduction to estimation and hypothesis testing.
Grading status: Letter grade.

BIOS 661. Probability and Statistical Inference II. 3 Credits.

Distribution of functions of random variables; Helmert transformation theory; central limit theorem and other asymptotic theory; estimation theory; maximum likelihood methods; hypothesis testing; power; Neyman-Pearson Theorem, likelihood ratio, score, and Wald tests; noncentral distributions.
Requisites: Prerequisite, BIOS 660; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.
Grading status: Letter grade.

BIOS 662. Intermediate Statistical Methods. 4 Credits.

Principles of study design, descriptive statistics, sampling from finite and infinite populations, inferences about location and scale. Both distribution-free and parametric approaches are considered. Gaussian, binomial, and Poisson models, one-way and two-way contingency tables.
Requisites: Pre- or corequisites, BIOS 511 and 550.
Grading status: Letter grade.

BIOS 663. Intermediate Linear Models. 4 Credits.

Required preparation, BIOS 662. Matrix-based treatment of regression, one-way and two-way ANOVA, and ANCOVA, emphasizing the general linear model and hypothesis, as well as diagnostics and model building. Reviews matrix algebra. Includes statistical power for linear models and binary response regression methods.
Grading status: Letter grade.

BIOS 664. Sample Survey Methodology. 4 Credits.

Fundamental principles and methods of sampling populations, with emphasis on simple, random, stratified, and cluster sampling. Sample weights, nonsampling error, and analysis of data from complex designs are covered. Practical experience through participation in the design, execution, and analysis of a sampling project.
Requisites: Prerequisite, BIOS 550; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.
Gen Ed: EE-Field Work.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: STOR 358.

BIOS 665. Analysis of Categorical Data. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the analysis of categorized data: rates, ratios, and proportions; relative risk and odds ratio; Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel procedure; survivorship and life table methods; linear models for categorical data. Applications in demography, epidemiology, and medicine.
Requisites: Prerequisites, BIOS 545, 550, and 662; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites.
Grading status: Letter grade.

BIOS 667. Applied Longitudinal Data Analysis. 3 Credits.

Analysis of variance and multiple linear regression course at the level of BIOS 545 or 663 required. Familiarity with matrix algebra recommended. Univariate and multivariate repeated measures ANOVA, GLM for longitudinal data, linear mixed models. Estimation and inference, maximum and restricted maximum likelihood, fixed and random effects.
Grading status: Letter grade.

BIOS 668. Design of Public Health Studies. 3 Credits.

Statistical concepts in basic public health study designs: cross-sectional, case-control, prospective, and experimental (including clinical trials). Validity, measurement of response, sample size determination, matching and random allocation methods.
Requisites: Prerequisites, BIOS 545 and 550.
Grading status: Letter grade.

BIOS 669. Working with Data in a Public Health Research Setting. 3 Credits.

Provides a foundation and training for working with data from clinical trials or research studies. Topics: issues in study design, collecting quality data, using SAS and SQL to transform data, typical reports, data closure and export, and working with big data.
Requisites: Prerequisite, BIOS 511 or EPID 700; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.
Grading status: Letter grade.

BIOS 670. Demographic Techniques I. 3 Credits.

Source and interpretation of demographic data; rates and ratios, standardization, complete and abridged life tables; estimation and projection of fertility, mortality, migration, and population composition.
Grading status: Letter grade.

BIOS 672. Probability and Statistical Inference I. 4 Credits.

Required preparation, three semesters of calculus. Introduction to probability; discrete and continuous random variables; combinatorics; expectation; random sums, multivariate distributions; functions of random variables; theory of sampling; convergence of sequences, power series, types of convergence, L'Hopital's rule, differentiable functions, Lebesgue integration, Fubini's theorem, convergence theorems, complex variables, Laplace transforms, inversion formulas.
Grading status: Letter grade.

BIOS 673. Probability and Statistical Inference II. 4 Credits.

Distribution of functions of random variables; central limit theorem and other asymptotic theory; estimation theory; hypothesis testing; Neyman-Pearson Theorem, likelihood ratio, score, and Wald tests; noncentral distributions. Advanced problems in statistical inferences, including information inequality, best unbiased estimators, Bayes estimators, asymptotically efficient estimation, nonparametric estimation and tests, simultaneous confidence intervals.
Requisites: Prerequisite, BIOS 660; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.
Grading status: Letter grade.

BIOS 680. Introductory Survivorship Analysis. 3 Credits.

Introduction to concepts and techniques used in the analysis of time to event data, including censoring, hazard rates, estimation of survival curves, regression techniques, applications to clinical trials.
Requisites: Prerequisite, BIOS 661; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.
Grading status: Letter grade.

BIOS 690. Special Topics in Biostatistics. 1-3 Credits.

Field/topical/research seminar. Instructors use this course to offer instruction in particular topics or approaches.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 6 total credits. 6 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

BIOS 691. Field Observations in Biostatistics. 1 Credit.

Field visits to, and evaluation of, major nonacademic biostatistical programs in the Research Triangle area. Field fee: $25.
Grading status: Letter grade.

BIOS 693H. Honors Research in Biostatistics. 3 Credits.

Directed research. Written and oral reports required.
Gen Ed: EE-Mentored Research.
Grading status: Letter grade.

BIOS 694H. Honors Research in Biostatistics. 3 Credits.

Directed research. Written and oral reports required.
Gen Ed: EE-Mentored Research.
Grading status: Letter grade.