Department of American Studies

Department of American Studies

http://amerstud.unc.edu

204 Greenlaw Hall, CB# 3520

(919) 962-5481

Elizabeth Engelhardt, Chair

Gabrielle Berlinger, Director of Undergraduate Studies

amstdus@unc.edu

Introduction

The Department of American Studies is one of the longest-standing interdisciplinary programs at UNC–Chapel Hill, with roots in the study of folklore and the American South going back to the 1920s. A formal program in American studies was established in 1968, and exciting additions in American Indian and indigenous studies, Southern studies, and global American studies have been added in the past two decades. The Department of American Studies has a tradition of vigorous teaching and an innovative curriculum that offers stimulating opportunities to study the United States and the diversity and influence of its peoples, institutions, texts, performances, and places. In addition, each of our areas of major concentration incorporates global and comparative perspectives. The department’s commitment to interdisciplinary approaches empowers students to value the nation’s complexity by engaging with a variety of historical, literary, artistic, political, social, cultural, legal, racial, ethnic, and ethnographic perspectives within and beyond the United States. American studies majors graduate with a comprehension of the dynamics of American culture that prepares them to make a responsible and critical difference in the variety of professions they choose to pursue.

The American studies major offers five areas of concentration, each with its own distinct degree requirements.

Advising

All majors and minors have a primary academic advisor in Steele Building. Students are strongly encouraged to meet regularly with their advisor and review their Tar Heel Tracker each semester. The department’s director of undergraduate studies works with current and prospective majors and minors by appointment. Further information on courses, opportunities, and honors theses may be obtained from the department’s Web site.

Graduate School and Career Opportunities

American studies is an excellent liberal arts major for students interested in graduate and professional school study. The major prepares students for graduate work in fields such as American history and literature. After receiving the baccalaureate degree, American studies majors consistently have been accepted in law and business schools, which are interested in students with a broad, interdisciplinary undergraduate background. American studies provides a solid basis for a variety of career choices, including public service, business, teaching, museum curation, and journalism. The folklore concentration and minor are a productive component of study for those preparing for graduate school in anthropology, communication, journalism, music, and folklore itself, as well as for those planning careers in museum curation, public arts presentation, and music production.

Professors

Robert Allen, Elizabeth Engelhardt, Marcie Cohen Ferris, Bernard Herman, Sharon Holland, Rachel Willis.

Associate Professors

Daniel Cobb, Glenn Hinson, Timothy Marr, Michelle Robinson, Patricia Sawin.

Assistant Professors

Gabrielle Berlinger, Benjamin Frey, Claude Clegg, Seth Kotch, Keith Richotte Jr., Jenny Tone-Pah-Hote.

Adjunct Professors

Daniel Anderson, W. Fitzhugh Brundage, Kathleen DuVal, Lawrence Grossberg, Philip Gura, Minrose Gwin, Jennifer Ho, Emily Kass, Michael Lienesch, Jocelyn Neal, Ruth Salvaggio, Tim Tyson.

Adjunct Associate Professors

Malinda Maynor Lowery, Eliza Richards, Jane Thrailkill, Anne Whisnant.

Adjunct Assistant Professors

Maggie Cao, Amy Locklear Hertel, Rachel Seidman, William Sturkey.

Affiliated Faculty

William Andrews (English and Comparative Literature), Jan Bardsley (Asian Studies), Richard Cante (Communication), Erin Carlston (English and Comparative Literature), Tyler Curtain (English and Comparative Literature), María DeGuzmán (English and Comparative Literature), Connie Eble (English and Comparative Literature), William R. Ferris (History), Rebecka Rutledge Fisher (English and Comparative Literature), Gregg Flaxman (English and Comparative Literature), David Garcia (Music), Laura Halperin (English and Comparative Literature), Reginald Hildebrand (African, African American, and Diaspora Studies), Jordynn Jack (English and Comparative Literature), Scott Kirsch (Geography), Valerie Lambert (Anthropology), Rosa Perelmuter (Romance Studies), Della Pollock (Communication), John Sweet (History), Harry Watson (History), Eric King Watts (Communication), Gang Yue (Asian Studies).

Professors Emeriti

Robert Cantwell, Peter Filene, Jacquelyn Hall, John Kasson, Joy Kasson, Townsend Ludington, Daniel W. Patterson, Theda Perdue, Charles G. Zug III.

Subjects in this department include: American Studies (AMST), Cherokee (CHER), Folklore (FOLK)

AMST–American Studies

Undergraduate-level Courses

AMST 51. First-Year Seminar: Navigating America. 3 Credits.

Analyze American journeys and destinations, focusing on how resources, technology, transportation, and cultural influences have transformed the navigation and documentation of America. Multimedia documentation of personal journey required.
Gen Ed: SS, CI, EE-Field Work.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 53. First-Year Seminar: The Family and Social Change in America. 3 Credits.

This course uses changes in the American family over the past century as a way of understanding larger processes of social change. Honors version available
Gen Ed: HS, CI, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 54. First-Year Seminar: The Indians' New Worlds: Southeastern Histories from 1200 to 1800. 3 Credits.

This course uses archaeological and historical scholarship to consider the histories of the Southern Indians from the Mississippian period to the end of the 18th century.
Gen Ed: HS, US, WB.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ANTH 54.

AMST 55. First-Year Seminar: Birth and Death in the United States. 3 Credits.

This course explores birth and death as essential human rites of passage that are invested with significance by changing and diverse American historical, cultural, ethnic, and ethical contexts. Honors version available
Gen Ed: PH, CI, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 56. Exploring American Memory. 3 Credits.

This course examines the contested and changing role of memory in constructing historical meaning, creating political ideologies, and imagining cultural communities.
Gen Ed: HS, NA, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 57. First-Year Seminar: Access to Higher Education. 3 Credits.

This course explores barriers to access to American colleges and universities. Success in application, admission, matriculation, and graduation requires ability and experience and is also a function of other advantages.
Gen Ed: SS, EE-Field Work, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 58. First-Year Seminar: Cultures of Dissent: Radical Social Thought in America since 1880. 3 Credits.

This course examines the history of radical social thought in American history, focusing in particular on examples from "leftist" and "collectivist" traditions, and emphasizes the many forms radicalism has taken by exploring different radical thinkers' dissenting critiques of dominant political, economic and social arrangements.
Gen Ed: HS, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 59. First-Year Seminar: American Indian Art in the 20th Century. 3 Credits.

This course examines 20th-century American Indian art within the context of critical topics in the field such as sovereignty, colonialism, modernity, modernism, gender, and representation.
Gen Ed: VP, CI, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 60. First-Year Seminar: American Indians in History, Law, and Literature. 3 Credits.

This research seminar provides a grounding in American Indian law, history, and literature. Students will conduct research for presentation on Wikipedia.
Gen Ed: HS, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 61. First-Year Seminar: Navigating the World through American Eyes. 3 Credits.

Designed to help prepare students for future study abroad opportunities and travel, service, and work in a global environment, the seminar focuses on critical differences, including transportation and other forms of infrastructure, that impact navigating places, people, and information. Individual competitive global travel proposals will be developed and presented.
Gen Ed: GL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 89. First Year Seminar: Special Topics. 3 Credits.

Special topics course. Content will vary each semester. Honors version available
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 6 total credits. 2 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 101. The Emergence of Modern America. 3 Credits.

Interdisciplinary examination of two centuries of American culture, focusing on moments of change and transformation.
Gen Ed: HS, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 102. Myth and History in American Memory. 3 Credits.

Examines the role of memory in constructing historical meaning and in imagining the boundaries of American cultural communities. Explores popular rituals, artifacts, monuments, and public performances. Previously offered as AMST 384.
Gen Ed: HS, NA, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 110. Introduction to the Cultures and Histories of Native North America. 3 Credits.

An interdisciplinary introduction to Native American history and studies. The course uses history, literature, art, and cultural studies to study the Native American experience.
Gen Ed: HS, NA, US.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: HIST 110.

AMST 175. Introduction to Food Studies: From Science to Society. 3 Credits.

Introduction to food studies covering a variety of topics including how food was consumed over history, land use and aquaculture, food in the arts, food and culture in the American South, food politics, and nutrition science.
Gen Ed: GL, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: NUTR 175, ANTH 175.

AMST 201. Literary Approaches to American Studies. 3 Credits.

A study of interdisciplinary methods and the concept of American Studies with an emphasis on the historical context for literary texts.
Gen Ed: LA, NA, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 202. Historical Approaches to American Studies. 3 Credits.

A study of interdisciplinary methods and the concept of American studies with an emphasis on historical and cultural analysis.
Gen Ed: HS, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 203. Approaches to American Indian Studies. 3 Credits.

Introduces students to the disciplines comprising American Indian studies and teaches them how to integrate disciplines for a more complete understanding of the experiences of American Indian peoples.
Gen Ed: HS, NA, US.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ANTH 203.

AMST 210. Approaches to Southern Studies: A Historical Analysis of the American South. 3 Credits.

An examination of both the mythical and real American South and its diverse peoples through the study of the region's archaeological, geographical, and environmental history integrated with the study of the region's sociology and its economic, political, intellectual, and religious history.
Gen Ed: HS, NA, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 211. Approaches to Southern Studies: The Literary and Cultural Worlds of the American South. 3 Credits.

An examination of Southern cultural identity, literary imagination, and sense of place with an emphasis on the fiction, folklore, foodways, art, architecture, music, and material culture of the American South.
Gen Ed: LA, NA, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 220. On the Question of the Animal: Contemporary Animal Studies. 3 Credits.

This course is an introduction to "animal studies," through animal rights, animal welfare, food studies, and the human/animal distinction in philosophical inquiry. We will read work from dog and horse trainers, and explore the history of the American racetrack. This course builds a moral and ethical reasoning skill set.
Gen Ed: PH, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 225. Comedy and Ethics. 3 Credits.

This course explores the historical, sociocultural, and legal significance of 20th- and 21st-century comedy in the United States. We will consider comedy as public voice; examine how humor constructs and disrupts American identities; and discuss the ethics of the creative process, performance, and reception.
Gen Ed: PH, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 225L. The Practice of Stand Up Comedy. 1 Credit.

Students will learn and practice the art of stand up comedy via structured assignments, group workshops, live performances and conversations that build on topics introduced in AMST 225. Class size is limited to 15 students. Instructor permission required.
Requisites: Pre- or corequisite, AMST 225.
Gen Ed: EE-Performing Arts.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 231. Native American History: The East. 3 Credits.

Covers the histories of American Indians east of the Mississippi River and before 1840. The approach is ethnohistorical.
Gen Ed: HS, NA, US.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: HIST 231.

AMST 233. Native American History: The West. 3 Credits.

Deals with the histories of Native Americans living west of the Mississippi River. It begins in the pre-Columbian past and extends to the end of the 19th century.
Gen Ed: HS, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: HIST 233.

AMST 234. Native American Tribal Studies. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to a tribally specific body of knowledge. The tribal focus of the course and the instructor change from term to term. Honors version available
Gen Ed: HS, NA, US.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: HIST 234, ANTH 234.

AMST 235. Native America in the 20th Century. 3 Credits.

This course deals with the political, economic, social, and cultural issues important to 20th-century Native Americans as they attempt to preserve tribalism in the modern world.
Gen Ed: HS, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: HIST 235.

AMST 246. Indigenous Storytelling: Oral, Written, and Visual Literatures of Native America. 3 Credits.

Offers a historically, politically, and culturally contextualized examination of Native America through oral, written, and visual storytelling. Covering a wide range of genres, including oral narratives, novels, and visual arts, this introductory course showcases the fluidity of Indigenous artistic forms and their continuing centrality in Native America.
Gen Ed: LA, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 248. Intersectionality: Race, Gender, Sexuality, and Social Justice. 3 Credits.

The first goal of this super course is to give students real tools for how to address multiple modes of difference and identity formations like race, gender, class, and sexuality.
Gen Ed: CI, US.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ENGL 248, POLI 248.

AMST 252. Muslim American Literatures and Cultures. 3 Credits.

This course examines the diversity of Muslims in America and the variety of creative expression created throughout this long history of transcultural involvement.
Gen Ed: LA, CI, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 253. A Social History of Jewish Women in America. 3 Credits.

Course examines the history and culture of Jewish women in America from their arrival in New Amsterdam in 1654 to the present and explores how gender shaped this journey.
Gen Ed: HS, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: JWST 253, WGST 253.

AMST 255. Mid-20th-Century American Thought and Culture. 3 Credits.

This course examines topics in the intellectual and cultural history of the United States in the mid-20th century, including issues of race thinking, mass culture, and gender ideologies.
Gen Ed: HS, NA, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 256. Anti-'50s: Voices of a Counter Decade. 3 Credits.

We remember the 1950s as a period of relative tranquility, happiness, optimism, and contentment. This course will consider a handful of countertexts: voices from literature, politics, and mass culture of the 1950s that for one or another reason found life in the postwar world repressive, empty, frightening, or insane and predicted the social and cultural revolutions that marked the decade that followed.
Gen Ed: LA, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 257. Melville: Culture and Criticism. 3 Credits.

Investigates the significance of Herman Melville as a representative 19th-century American author. Includes issues of biography, historical context, changing reception, cultural iconography, and the politics of the literary marketplace.
Gen Ed: LA, CI, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 258. Captivity and American Cultural Definition. 3 Credits.

Examines how representations of captivity and bondage in American expression worked to construct and transform communal categories of religion, race, class, gender, and nation.
Gen Ed: LA, NA, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 259. Tobacco and America. 3 Credits.

Explores the significance of tobacco from Native American ceremony to the Southern economy by focusing on changing attitudes toward land use, leisure, social style, public health, litigation, and global capitalism.
Gen Ed: HS, CI, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 266. The Folk Revival: The Singing Left in Mid-20th-Century America. 3 Credits.

Emphasizing cultural stratification, political dissent and commercialization in American youth and popular movements, this course will map the evolving political and cultural landscape of mid-20th-century America through the lens of the Folk Revival, from its origins in various regionalist, nativist, and socialist traditions of the 1920s to its alliance with the civil rights and anti-war movements of the 1960s.
Gen Ed: LA, NA, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 268. American Cinema and American Culture. 3 Credits.

Examines the relationship between cinema and culture in America with a focus on the ways cinema has been experienced in American communities since 1896.
Gen Ed: VP, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 269. Mating and Marriage in American Culture. 3 Credits.

Interdisciplinary examination of the married condition from colonial times to the present. Themes include courtship and romance, marital power and the egalitarian ideal, challenges to monogamy.
Gen Ed: HS, CI, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 276. Food and American Studies: Cooking Up a Storm. 3 Credits.

This course will take students on a journey through some of the key moments in "American" food studies and its beginnings across a range of disciplinary homes: the study of nutrition and food security; the study of food systems and the vocabularies that subtend them.
Gen Ed: CI, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 277. Globalization and National Identity. 3 Credits.

Considers the meanings and implications of globalization especially in relation to identity, nationhood, and America's place in the world. Honors version available
Gen Ed: HS, GL, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 278. Crimes and Punishments. 3 Credits.

This course explores the social history and culture of crime, deviant behavior, and punishment in America between the pre-revolutionary period and today. It traces the history of longstanding institutions; examines elements of American history from a criminal justice perspective; and seeks historical origins and continuities for contemporary problems.
Gen Ed: HS, CI, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 283. American Home. 3 Credits.

Examines themes in the history and design of the most intimate and most public of objects - the house. Residences, from tract house mansions to apartment buildings, are powerful statements about how we see our society and how circumstances and choice lead us to house ourselves. Previously numbered AMST 466.
Gen Ed: HS, CI, EE-Field Work.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 284. Visual Culture. 3 Credits.

This course investigates how we make and signify meaning through images, ranging from art to advertising to graffiti, and provides the critical tools to understand the visual worlds we inhabit.
Gen Ed: VP.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 285. Access to Work in America. 3 Credits.

Focus on systemic and individual factors affecting access to work including gender, race, age, disability, transportation, international competition, technological progress, change in labor markets, educational institutions, and public policy.
Gen Ed: SS, CI, EE-Field Work.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ECON 285.

AMST 287. Introduction to American Legal Education. 3 Credits.

Introduces students to how legal education is conducted in the United States by mimicking the "1L" experience, or first year in law school. It is broken into units that represent classes every law school teaches in the first year: contracts, property, torts, criminal law, civil procedure, and constitutional law.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 290. Topics in American Studies. 3 Credits.

Special topics in American studies.
Gen Ed: LA, NA.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 291. Ethics and American Studies. 3 Credits.

An interdisciplinary seminar in American studies addressing ethical issues in the United States.
Gen Ed: PH, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 292. Historical Seminar in American Studies. 3 Credits.

Topics in American history in American studies. Honors version available
Gen Ed: HS, NA.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit. 12 total credits. 4 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 294. American Studies Seminar on Aesthetic Perspective. 3 Credits.

Topics in arts and literature from the perspective of American studies.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit. 12 total credits. 4 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 317. Adoption in America. 3 Credits.

An interdisciplinary approach to the history of adoption and related practices in the United States, employing the provisions society has made for the welfare of children deemed to be orphans as a powerful lens into changing values and attitudes toward childhood, race, class, gender, reproduction, parenthood, and family.
Gen Ed: HS, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 325. Encountering Art in the Unexpected: Borderlands and Story in Contemporary American Visual Art. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the contemporary art and social change movement. We will learn how to use site-specific and performative art interventions to make invisible borders, boundaries, and other issues visible and innovatively to create engaged and sustained dialogue.
Gen Ed: VP, US.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: WGST 325.

AMST 334. Defining America I. 3 Credits.

An interdisciplinary seminar that considers the changing understandings of what it meant to be American up through the United States Civil War. Honors version available
Gen Ed: HS, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 335. Defining America II. 3 Credits.

An interdisciplinary seminar that investigates the changing meanings of being American since the United States Civil War. Honors version available
Gen Ed: LA, NA, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 336. Native Americans in Film. 3 Credits.

This course is about Hollywood's portrayal of Indians in film, how Indian films have depicted Native American history, and why the filmic representation of Indians has changed over time.
Gen Ed: VP, NA, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 337. Beyond Red Power: American Indian Activism since 1900. 3 Credits.

This course seeks to understand how American Indian individuals and communities survived a century that began with predictions of their disappearance. To answer that question, we take a broad view of politics and activism, exploring everything from the radical protest to art and everyday forms of resistance.
Gen Ed: HS, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 338. Native American Novel. 3 Credits.

This course examines this art form's development by indigenous writers as a mode of storytelling that explores the continuing effects of settler colonialism upon indigenous peoples and foregrounds indigenous notions of land, culture, and community.
Gen Ed: LA, CI, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 339. The Long 1960s in Native America. 3 Credits.

An interdisciplinary exploration of Native America during the "long 1960s" (1954-1973), this course focuses on how American Indian experiences intersected with and diverged from those of non-native groups via topics such as the youth movement, women's rights, nationalism, civil rights, radical protest, and creative expression.
Gen Ed: HS, CI, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 340. American Indian Art and Material Culture through Interdisciplinary Perspectives. 3 Credits.

Analyzes material culture created by Native artists throughout the United States and portions of Canada. Examines the role of art and artists and how material culture is studied and displayed. Students study objects, texts, and images, exploring mediums such as painting, sculpture, basket making, beadwork, and photography.
Gen Ed: VP, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 341. Digital Native America. 3 Credits.

This is a project-based course that explores settler colonial appropriations of American Indian knowledge. Students then use new technologies as a means of engaging in the digital re-representation and return of this knowledge. Instructor and topics vary.
Gen Ed: SS, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 350. Main Street Carolina: A Cultural History of North Carolina Downtowns. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the interdisciplinary scholarly approaches to the physical, social, economic, and cultural developments of downtowns. Students will conduct and share original research. Honors version available
Gen Ed: HS, EE-Mentored Research, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 360. The Jewish Writer in American Life. 3 Credits.

This course will investigate, through literature, film, and song, the encounter of Eastern European Jews and their descendants with Anglo-Protestant America over four generations.
Gen Ed: LA, NA, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 365. Women and Detective Fiction: From Miss Violet Strange to Veronica Mars. 3 Credits.

Traces the origins of detective fiction and major developments in the history of the genre with a focus on women authors and protagonists. Examines literary texts including fiction and film, with close attention to historical and social contexts and to theoretical arguments relating to popular fiction, genre studies, and gender.
Gen Ed: LA.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 371. LGTBQ Film and Fiction from 1950 to the Present. 3 Credits.

An interdisciplinary seminar that explores stylistic choices and representational modes available to LGTBQ artists in the United States since 1950. We will relate shifts in cinematic and literary representations and aesthetic strategies to developments in political, social, and economic life.
Gen Ed: VP, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 374. America's Threatened Languages. 3 Credits.

This course introduces the phenomena of language shift, endangerment, and revitalization in America. In both indigenous and immigrant communities, the mid-1800s initiated a widespread shift toward English. Through readings and discussions, we examine the social and historical motivations for this trend, and explore critical thinking skills for analyzing language shift.
Gen Ed: SS, CI, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 375. Carolina Cooks, Carolina Eats: North Carolina Food and Culture. 3 Credits.

An exploration of the history, culture, and contemporary politics of food in North Carolina as a lens onto national and global food issues.
Gen Ed: SS, US.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: FOLK 375.

AMST 378. Nation Building and National Identity in Australia and the United States. 3 Credits.

This course compares the cultural and social histories of two settler societies: the United States and Australia. Focus on selected topics, including landscape, indigenous peoples, national identity, exploration. Honors version available
Gen Ed: HS, BN, GL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 385. Gender and Economics. 3 Credits.

Survey of women's time allocation patterns, labor force participation trends, earnings, occupational selection, and economic history.
Gen Ed: SS, CI, EE-Field Work.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ECON 385, WGST 385.

AMST 386. American Families. 3 Credits.

Students research the history of their own families as we examine the history of the family as a social institution in America.
Gen Ed: HS, CI, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 387. Race and Empire in 20th-Century American Intellectual History. 3 Credits.

This upper-level seminar explores influential 20th-century writings on race and empire and colonialism by intellectuals from America and around the world.
Gen Ed: HS, CI.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 390. Seminar in American Studies. 3 Credits.

Seminar in American studies topics with a focus on historical inquiry from interdisciplinary angles.
Gen Ed: HS, NA.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 392. Radical Communities in Twentieth Century American Religious History. 3 Credits.

How the language, ideas, and cultural products of religious outsiders responded to and influenced mainstream ideas about what American religious communities could and should look like in terms of gender, race, economics, and faith-based practices.
Gen Ed: PH, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 394. The University in American Life: The University of North Carolina. 3 Credits.

This team-taught course is for juniors and seniors and is multifaceted in its inquiry into the role of the university in American life. UNC--Chapel Hill is used as the case study.
Gen Ed: CI, EE-Field Work, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 394L. Role of the University. 1 Credit.

Field laboratory explores UNC--Chapel Hill campus sites and Triangle-area universities. One four-hour laboratory a week.
Requisites: Pre- or corequisite, AMST 394.
Gen Ed: EE-Field Work.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 396. Independent Study in American Studies. 3 Credits.

Permission of the department. Directed reading under the supervision of a faculty member.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit. 12 total credits. 4 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 398. Service Learning in America. 3 Credits.

Explores history and theory of volunteerism and service learning in America. Includes a weekly academic seminar and placement in a service learning project.
Gen Ed: CI, EE-Service Learning.
Grading status: Letter grade.

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate-level Courses

AMST 410. Senior Seminar in Southern Studies. 3 Credits.

We will engage such topics as race, immigration, cultural tourism, and memory to consider conceptions of the South. Students will research a subject they find compelling and write a 20- to 25-page paper.
Gen Ed: HS, EE-Mentored Research, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 420. Theories in American Studies. 3 Credits.

This course will move through prevalent theories in American studies to familiarize students with theoretical concepts and to ascertain both the advantages and pitfalls of theoretical landscapes. Students will become familiar with critical race (postcoloniality and settler-colonialism, for example), feminist, "queer" theories, historical materialism, political economy, postcolonialism, and bio-power.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 439. Meaning and Makers: Indigenous Artists and the Marketplace. 3 Credits.

This course examines how indigenous artists have negotiated, shaped, and pursued markets and venues of display ranging from "fine" art markets, galleries, and museums to popular markets associated with tourism.
Gen Ed: VP, CI, GL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 440. American Indian Poetry. 3 Credits.

This course explores the relation of American Indian poetry and music in English to the history and culture of indigenous communities and their relation to the United States.
Gen Ed: LA.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 475. Documenting Communities. 3 Credits.

Covers the definition and documentation of communities within North Carolina through research, study, and field work of communities. Each student produces a documentary on a specific community. Previously offered as AMST 275. Honors version available
Gen Ed: SS, CI, EE-Field Work.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 482. Images of the American Landscape. 3 Credits.

This course will consider how real estate speculation, transportation, suburbanization, and consumerism have shaped a landscape whose many representations in art and narrative record our ongoing struggle over cultural meaning.
Gen Ed: HS, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 483. Seeing the USA: Visual Arts and American Culture. 3 Credits.

Examines the ways in which visual works - paintings, photographs, sculpture, architecture, film, advertising, and other images - communicate the values of American culture and raise questions about American experiences.
Gen Ed: VP, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 485. Folk, Self-Taught, Vernacular, and Outsider Arts. 3 Credits.

Drawing on American and international examples, this course addresses a body of art that occupies the borderlands of contemporary art, examining questions of authenticity, dysfunction, aesthetics, and identity.
Gen Ed: VP.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 486. Shalom Y'all: The Jewish Experience in the American South. 3 Credits.

This course explores ethnicity in the South and focuses on the history and culture of Jewish Southerners from their arrival in the Carolinas in the 17th century to the present day.
Gen Ed: HS, CI, US.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: JWST 486.

AMST 487. Early American Architecture and Material Life. 3 Credits.

This course explores, through lecture and discussion, the experiences of everyday life from 1600 through the early 19th century, drawing on the evidence of architecture, landscape, images, and objects.
Gen Ed: VP, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 488. No Place like Home: Material Culture of the American South. 3 Credits.

Seminar will explore the unique worlds of Southern material culture and how "artifacts" from barns to biscuits provide insight about the changing social and cultural history of the American South.
Gen Ed: VP, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: FOLK 488.

AMST 489. Writing Material Culture. 3 Credits.

A reading seminar that examines multiple critical perspectives that shape the reception and interpretation of objects, with a particular emphasis on things in American life.
Gen Ed: VP.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 493. Internship. 1-3 Credits.

Permission of the department and the instructor. Internship. Variable credit.
Gen Ed: EE-Academic Internship.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit. 6 total credits. 2 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 498. Advanced Seminar in American Studies. 3 Credits.

Graduate or junior/senior standing. Examines American civilization by studying social and cultural history, criticism, art, architecture, music, film, popular pastimes, and amusements, among other possible topics.
Gen Ed: VP, NA.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 9 total credits. 3 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 510. Federal Indian Law and Policy. 3 Credits.

This course gives an introduction to the American government's law and policy concerning tribal nations and tribal peoples. We examine a number of legal and political interactions to determine how the United States has answered the "Indian problem" throughout its history and the status of tribal peoples and nations today.
Gen Ed: HS, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 511. American Indians and American Law. 3 Credits.

This course explores the history of Native interaction with the American legal system in order to understand how the law affects Native peoples and others today. Students are encouraged (but not required) to take AMST 510 before enrolling in this course.
Gen Ed: HS, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 512. Race and American Law. 3 Credits.

This class will explore the intersection between race and American law, both in a historical and contemporary context. It will ask how both of these major social forces have informed and defined each other and what that means for how we think about race and law today.
Gen Ed: US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 671. Introduction to Public History. 3 Credits.

Introduces the theory, politics, and practice of historical work conducted in public venues (museums, historic sites, national parks, government agencies, archives), directed at public audiences, or addressed to public issues.
Gen Ed: HS, EE-Mentored Research, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: HIST 671.

AMST 685. Literature of the Americas. 3 Credits.

Two years of college-level Spanish or the equivalent strongly recommended. Multidisciplinary examination of texts and other media of the Americas, in English and Spanish, from a variety of genres.
Gen Ed: LA, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ENGL 685, CMPL 685.

AMST 691H. Honors in American Studies. 3 Credits.

Directed independent research leading to the preparation of an honors thesis and an oral examination on the thesis. Required of candidates for graduation with honors in American studies who enroll in the class once permission to pursue honors is granted.
Gen Ed: EE-Mentored Research.
Grading status: Letter grade.

AMST 692H. Honors in American Studies. 3 Credits.

Directed independent research leading to the preparation of an honors thesis and an oral examination on the thesis. Required of candidates for graduation with honors in American studies who enroll in the class once permission to pursue honors is granted.
Gen Ed: EE-Mentored Research.
Grading status: Letter grade.

CHER–Cherokee

Undergraduate-level Courses

CHER 101. Elementary Cherokee Language I. 3 Credits.

Provides an introduction to speaking, listening, reading, and writing in the Cherokee language. This course is part of an ongoing effort to revitalize Cherokee--an endangered language indigenous to North Carolina. Students will acquire basic conversational Cherokee and learn to read and write the Sequoyah syllabary.
Gen Ed: FL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

CHER 102. Elementary Cherokee Language II. 3 Credits.

Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. This course expands on skills from CHER 101. We will begin reading longer texts in the Cherokee syllabary and learn to produce more complex narrative structures. Students will move toward discussing others around them, with an eye toward discussing the general world.
Requisites: Prerequisite, CHER 101.
Gen Ed: FL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

CHER 203. Intermediate Cherokee Language I. 3 Credits.

Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. This course reviews and deepens grammatical knowledge from CHER 101 and 102. We will increase extemporaneous speaking and produce new written texts in the Cherokee syllabary. Students will discuss the world around them in addition to the self and others.
Requisites: Prerequisite, CHER 102.
Gen Ed: FL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

CHER 204. Intermediate Cherokee Language II. 3 Credits.

Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. This course completes the study of basic Cherokee grammar. We will polish conversational fluency and proficiency, read and create new texts in the Cherokee syllabary. Students will discuss current events and offer opinions.
Requisites: Prerequisite, CHER 203.
Gen Ed: FL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

CHER 305. Phonetics and General Linguistics. 3 Credits.

Introduction to linguistics; the Cherokee sound system from a phonetic and allophonic view; grammatical categories, morphology, syntax.
Requisites: Prerequisite, CHER 204.
Gen Ed: FI.
Grading status: Letter grade.

FOLK–Folklore

Undergraduate-level Courses

FOLK 77. First-Year Seminar: The Poetic Roots of Hip-Hop: Hidden Histories of African American Rhyme. 3 Credits.

What are the roots of hip-hop's masterful rhymes and tongue-tripping flow? This seminar explores hip-hop's poetic prehistory, looking to the rhyming and oral poetics that have long defined African American experience. In so doing, we'll uncover hidden histories of everyday eloquence and explore spoken/sung poetry's role in marking cultural identity. Honors version available
Gen Ed: VP, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

FOLK 89. First-Year Seminar: Special Topics. 3 Credits.

Special topics course. Content will vary each semester.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 6 total credits. 2 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

FOLK 130. Anthropology of the Caribbean. 3 Credits.

Theories and examples of how Caribbean people live, act, and see themselves within various cultural, social, economic, and political contexts across time. Attention to North American views of the Caribbean.
Gen Ed: SS, BN, GL.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ANTH 130.

FOLK 202. Introduction to Folklore. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the study of creativity and aesthetic expression in everyday life, considering both traditional genres and contemporary innovations in the material, verbal, and musical arts.
Gen Ed: SS, US.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ENGL 202, ANTH 202.

FOLK 230. Native American Cultures. 3 Credits.

Broad survey of contemporary American Indian societies and cultures in the United States. Explores socio-cultural and historical diversity of tribes through film, autobiography, literature, current issues, guest speakers, archaeology, and history.
Gen Ed: SS, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ANTH 230.

FOLK 310. Fairy Tales. 3 Credits.

A study of fairy tales as historical artifacts that reveal the concerns of their times and places, as narrative structures capable of remarkable transformation, and as artistic performances drawing upon the expressive resources of multiple media, intended to challenge conventional presuppositions about the genre.
Gen Ed: LA, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ENGL 310.

FOLK 323. Magic, Ritual, and Belief. 3 Credits.

Permission of the instructor. Starting with the late 19th-century evolutionists, this course discusses, intensively, major anthropological theories of magico-religious thought and practice, then offers an approach of its own.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ANTH 323.

FOLK 334. Art, Nature, and Religion: Cross-Cultural Perspectives. 3 Credits.

This cross-cultural study of art focuses on the forms, images, and meanings of paintings, drawings, and carvings produced by the Diyin Dine'é (Navajo), the Dogon (Mali, West Africa), and the Haida, Kwagiutl, Tlingit, and Tshimshian (northwest coast of North America).
Gen Ed: VP.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ANTH 334.

FOLK 340. Southern Styles, Southern Cultures. 4 Credits.

A journey into hidden worlds of southern meaning, exploring the region from the experiential lens of African Americans and the South's indigenous peoples, as a way of rethinking the question, "What does it mean to be a Southerner?" Students will explore focused issues each semester through intensive, group-based field work projects.
Gen Ed: SS, EE-Field Work, US.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ANTH 340.

FOLK 342. African-American Religious Experience. 3 Credits.

Permission of the instructor. An introduction to the diversity of African American beliefs, experiences, and expressions from the colonial era to the present. Exploration will be both historical and thematic.
Gen Ed: SS, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: RELI 342, ANTH 342.

FOLK 375. Carolina Cooks, Carolina Eats: North Carolina Food and Culture. 3 Credits.

An exploration of the history, culture, and contemporary politics of food in North Carolina as a lens onto national and global food issues.
Gen Ed: SS, US.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: AMST 375.

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate-level Courses

FOLK 424. Ritual, Festival, and Public Culture. 3 Credits.

This course explores rituals, festivals, and public cultural performances as forms of complex, collective, embodied creative expression. As sites of popular celebration, conflict resolution, identity definition, and social exchange, they provide rich texts for folkloristic study. We consider how local and global forces both sustain and challenge these forms.
Gen Ed: SS, EE-Field Work.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ANTH 424.

FOLK 428. Religion and Anthropology. 3 Credits.

Religion studied anthropologically as a cultural, social, and psychological phenomenon in the works of classical and contemporary social thought.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ANTH 428, RELI 428.

FOLK 429. Culture and Power in Southeast Asia. 3 Credits.

The formation and transformation of values, identities, and expressive forms in Southeast Asia in response to forms of power. Emphasis on the impact of colonialism, the nation-state, and globalization.
Gen Ed: SS, BN, GL.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ANTH 429, ASIA 429.

FOLK 435. Consciousness and Symbols. 3 Credits.

This course explores consciousness through symbols. Symbols from religion, art, politics, and self are studied in social, psychological, historical, and ecological context to ascertain meanings in experience and behavior.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ANTH 435, CMPL 435.

FOLK 454. Historical Geography of the United States. 3 Credits.

A study of selected past geographies of the United States with emphasis on the significant geographic changes in population, cultural, and economic conditions through time. (GHA)
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: GEOG 454.

FOLK 455. Ethnohistory. 3 Credits.

Integration of data from ethnographic and archaeological research with pertinent historic information. Familiarization with a wide range of sources for ethnohistoric data and practice in obtaining and evaluating information. Pertinent theoretical concepts will be explored.
Gen Ed: HS.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ANTH 455.

FOLK 470. Medicine and Anthropology. 3 Credits.

This course examines cultural understandings of health, illness, and medical systems from an anthropological perspective with a special focus on Western medicine.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ANTH 470.

FOLK 473. Anthropology of the Body and the Subject. 3 Credits.

Anthropological and historical studies of cultural constructions of bodily experience and subjectivity are reviewed, with emphasis on the genesis of the modern individual and cultural approaches to gender and sexuality.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ANTH 473.

FOLK 476. Graffiti, Gods, and Gardens: Urban Folklore. 3 Credits.

What is the relationship between distinctive features of urban environments and the expressive forms found in those settings? This course explores the impact of the urban setting on folk traditions. We examine how people transform urban spaces into places of meaning through storytelling, festival, ritual, food, art, music, and dance.
Gen Ed: VP, EE-Field Work, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

FOLK 480. Vernacular Traditions in African American Music. 4 Credits.

Explores performance traditions in African American music, tracing development from African song through reels, blues, gospel, and contemporary vernacular expression. Focuses on continuity, creativity, and change within African American aesthetics. Previously offered as FOLK 610/AAAD 432.
Gen Ed: HS, EE-Field Work, US.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: AAAD 480.

FOLK 481. The Changing Lives of Jewish Objects. 3 Credits.

What makes an object "Jewish"? This seminar examines how we think about, animate, repurpose, and display "Jewish" objects in contemporary life -- the public realm, cultural institutions, religious spaces, and the home. We consider how makers and users negotiate objects' various meanings within the domains of prayer, performance, entertainment, and exhibition.
Gen Ed: VP, EE-Field Work, US.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: JWST 481.

FOLK 484. Discourse and Dialogue in Ethnographic Research. 3 Credits.

Study of cultural variation in styles of speaking applied to collection of ethnographic data. Talk as responsive social action and its role in the constitution of ethnic and gender identities.
Gen Ed: SS, CI, US.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ANTH 484, LING 484.

FOLK 487. Everyday Stories: Personal Narrative and Legend. 3 Credits.

Oral storytelling may seem old-fashioned, but we tell true (or possibly true) stories every day. We will study personal narratives (about our own experiences) and legends (about improbable, intriguing events), exploring the techniques and structures that make them effective communication tools and the influence of different contexts and audiences.
Gen Ed: CI, US.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ENGL 487.

FOLK 488. No Place like Home: Material Culture of the American South. 3 Credits.

Seminar will explore the unique worlds of Southern material culture and how "artifacts" from barns to biscuits provide insight about the changing social and cultural history of the American South.
Gen Ed: VP, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: AMST 488.

FOLK 490. Topics in Folklore. 3 Credits.

Topics vary from semester to semester.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

FOLK 495. Field Research. 3 Credits.

Research at sites that vary.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

FOLK 496. Directed Readings in Folklore. 3 Credits.

Permission of the department. Topic varies depending on the instructor.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit. 12 total credits. 4 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

FOLK 502. Myths and Epics of the Ancient Near East. 3 Credits.

An examination of Babylonian, Canaanite, Egyptian, Hittite, and Sumerian texts from the prebiblical era, focusing on representative myths, epics, sagas, songs, proverbs, prophecies, and hymns.
Gen Ed: LA, WB.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: RELI 502.

FOLK 505. Traditions in Transition: Jewish Folklore and Ethnography. 3 Credits.

This seminar examines Jewish stories, humor, ritual, custom, belief, architecture, dress, and food as forms of creative expression that have complex relationships to Jewish experience, representation, identity, memory, and tradition. What makes these forms of folklore Jewish, how do source communities interpret them, and how do ethnographers document them?
Gen Ed: VP, EE-Field Work, US.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: JWST 505.

FOLK 525. Culture and Personality. 3 Credits.

Systems theory used to conceptualize relationship between cultural patterns and individual minds. Functional, dysfunctional, and therapeutic processes considered. Examples from Africa, Asia, Europe, and Native America. Lectures, films, recitations.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ANTH 525.

FOLK 537. Gender and Performance: Constituting Identity. 3 Credits.

Examines the culturally and historically variable ways in which individuals constitute themselves as cis- or transgendered subjects, drawing upon extant expressive resources, modifying them, and expanding options available to others. Performance of self as the product of esthetically marked or unmarked, everyday actions.
Gen Ed: SS, GL.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ANTH 537, WGST 438.

FOLK 550. Introduction to Material Culture. 3 Credits.

An introduction to material folk culture, exploring the meanings that people bring to traditional arts and the artful creations with which they surround themselves (e.g., architecture, clothing, altars, tools, food).
Gen Ed: VP.
Grading status: Letter grade.

FOLK 560. Southern Literature and the Oral Tradition. 3 Credits.

Course considers how Southern writers employ folklore genres such as folk tales, sermons, and music and how such genres provide structure for literary forms like the novel and the short story.
Gen Ed: HS, NA, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

FOLK 562. Oral History and Performance. 3 Credits.

This course combines readings and field work in oral history with the study of performance as a means of interpreting and conveying oral history texts. Honors version available
Gen Ed: EE-Performing Arts.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: COMM 562, HIST 562, WGST 562.

FOLK 565. Ritual, Theatre, and Performance Art. 3 Credits.

Explores how each of these forms of performance communicates meaning and feeling and points to possibility. Students develop performances in each mode, informed by readings in anthropology and directing theory.
Requisites: Prerequisite, COMM 160; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: COMM 362.

FOLK 571. Southern Music. 3 Credits.

Explores the history of music in the American South from its roots to 20th-century musical forms, revealing how music serves as a window on the region's history and culture.
Gen Ed: HS, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: HIST 571.

FOLK 587. Folklore in the South. 3 Credits.

An issue-oriented study of Southern folklore, exploring the ways that vernacular artistic expression (from barns and barbecue to gospel and well-told tales) come to define both community and region.
Gen Ed: VP, NA.
Grading status: Letter grade.

FOLK 670. Introduction to Oral History. 3 Credits.

Introduces students to the uses of interviews in historical research. Questions of ethics, interpretation, and the construction of memory will be explored, and interviewing skills will be developed through field work.
Gen Ed: HS, CI.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: HIST 670.

FOLK 675. Ethnographic Method. 3 Credits.

Intensive study and practice of the core research methods of cultural and social anthropology.
Gen Ed: SS, CI.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ANTH 675.

FOLK 688. Observation and Interpretation of Religious Action. 3 Credits.

Permission of the instructor. Exercises (including field work) in learning to read the primary modes of public action in religious traditions, e.g., sermons, testimonies, rituals, and prayers.
Gen Ed: SS, EE-Mentored Research.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: ANTH 688, RELI 688.

FOLK 690. Studies In Folklore. 3 Credits.

Topic varies from semester to semester.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 4 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

FOLK 691H. Honors Project in Folklore. 3 Credits.

Permission of the instructor. For honors candidates. Ethnographic and/or library research and analysis of the gathered materials, leading to a draft of an honors thesis.
Gen Ed: EE-Mentored Research.
Grading status: Letter grade.

FOLK 692H. Honors Thesis in Folklore. 3 Credits.

Writing of an honors thesis based on independent research conducted in FOLK 691H. Open only to senior honors candidates who work under the direction of a faculty member.
Requisites: Prerequisite, FOLK 691H.
Gen Ed: EE-Mentored Research.
Grading status: Letter grade.