PATHOLOGY (PATH)

PATH 128. Biology of Human Disease. 3 Credits.

Open to all undergraduates. An overview of basic human molecular and cellular biology in the setting of common human diseases. The course emphasizes how an understanding of disease mechanisms provides the knowledge base for informed use of modern health care. Does not count as a course in the major.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: BIOL 128.

PATH 426. Biology of Blood Diseases. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the biology and pathophysiology of blood and the molecular mechanisms of some human diseases: anemias; leukemias; hemorrhagic, thrombotic, and vascular disorders; and HIV disease/AIDS.
Requisites: Prerequisite, BIOL 205; Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.
Same as: BIOL 426.

PATH 462. Experimental Pathology. 1-9 Credits.

Hours, credits, and instructor to be arranged on an individual basis. Hands-on research experience in a predetermined instructor's laboratory. Students learn and apply specific techniques and participate in investigations of molecular mechanisms responsible for disease processes (pathobiology). Contact the director of graduate studies in pathology for information. May be repeated.

PATH 464. Light Microscopy. 3 Credits.

Permission of the instructor. Course focuses on practical fundamentals of light microscopy including optics, contrast mechanisms, fluorescence, laser scanning confocal microscopy, photography, and digital imaging.

PATH 713. Molecular and Cellular Pathophysiological Basis of Disease: Mechanisms of Disease. 3 Credits.

A graduate course on cell injury and pathogenesis of disease with emphasis on basic mechanisms at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels. Three lecture hours with a complementary two-and-a-half-hour laboratory each week.
Requisites: Co-requisite, PATH 714L.

PATH 714L. Molecular and Cellular Pathophysiological Basis of Disease: Laboratory I. 2 Credits.

Pre- or A graduate-level laboratory course on basic mechanisms of disease pathogenesis, emphasizing cell and tissue-based examples of major disease mechanisms.
Requisites: co-requisite, PATH 713.

PATH 715. Molecular and Cellular Pathophysiological Basis of Disease: Systemic Pathology. 3 Credits.

A graduate-level laboratory course on systemic pathology, emphasizing diseases of major organ systems. A follow-up to PATH 713/714L. Three lecture hours (three credits) with a complementary two-and-a-half-hour laboratory ( two credits) each week.
Requisites: Co-requisite, PATH 716L.

PATH 716L. Molecular and Cellular Pathophysiological Basis of Disease: Laboratory II. 2 Credits.

Pre- or A graduate-level laboratory course on mechanisms of systemic disease pathogenesis, emphasizing cell and tissue-based examples of diseases of the major organ systems.
Requisites: co-requisite, PATH 715.

PATH 723. Practical Considerations for Translational Research. 2 Credits.

Permission of the instructor. A multi-disciplinary course providing students principles involved in translating basic science into clinically applicable diagnostics and therapies to improve human disease outcomes. The course is focused on bioinformatics, bioethics, trial design, FDA approval, and commercialization of laboratory diagnostics.

PATH 725. Cancer Pathobiology. 3 Credits.

Permission of the instructor. This course examines pathobiological features of cancer. An interdisciplinary approach draws from epidemiology, genetics, molecular biology, and clinical medicine to investigate cancer etiology, pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment.

PATH 726. Human Environmental Disease. 1-3 Credits.

This course will study human disease processes that are induced or exacerbated by our environment. Environmental disease stressors include solar radiation, air and water pollution, bioreactive substances in foods, pesticides, metals, dusts, particles, and allergens. Lectures will emphasize epidemiology, mechanisms of toxicity, and human disease pathogenesis.

PATH 766. Current Topics in Cardiovascular Biology. 3 Credits.

Permission of the instructor. Second-year graduate students only. This manuscript-based course will emphasize recent advances in heart and blood vessel development, the molecular mechanisms that regulate cardiovascular cell function, and current methodologies in the cardiovascular field. It will be team taught by members of UNC's McAllister Heart Institute.

PATH 767. Molecular and Cellular Biology of Cardiovascular Diseases. 3 Credits.

Second year graduate students or permission of the instructor. Course reviews the molecular, cellular, and organismal pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. It is team-taught by faculty with topic expertise and stresses primary literature and current methodologies. May be taken as a companion to PATH766 or on its own.

PATH 792. Seminar in Carcinogenesis. 2 Credits.

Permission of the instructor. Survey of classical and current literature on selected critical issues in carcinogenesis. Students discuss experimental methods and observations as well as theories and generalizations. Two seminar hours a week.
Same as: TOXC 792.

PATH 801. Cell Cycle Regulation and Cancer. 3 Credits.

This journal club-style discussion course will focus on molecular events that regulate normal cell cycle progression, and on how deregulation of the cell cycle leads to cancer. Classes will follow the development of the cell cycle field chronologically, learning how current concepts and paradigms have evolved through scientific inquiry.
Same as: GNET 801.

PATH 890. Special Topics in Pathology. 1-3 Credits.

A study in special fields under the direction of the faculty. Offered as needed for presenting material not normally available.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit. 6 total credits. 3 total completions.

PATH 900. Research in Pathology. 2-12 Credits.

Permission of the department. This is a research course in which advanced students in pathology carry on investigations on mechanisms of disease. Six or more laboratory hours a week, to be arranged. May be repeated.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit.

PATH 920. Seminar in Interdisciplinary Vascular Biology. 1 Credit.

Permission of the instructor. Participants in the Interdisciplinary Vascular Biology Training Program only. Students will be required to present their thesis work as a formal seminar, give an introductory lecture to introduce their project (in cooperation with their thesis advisor), and to attend and discuss the seminars of other students.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit. 6 total credits. 6 total completions.

PATH 993. Master's Research and Thesis. 3 Credits.

May be repeated.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit.

PATH 994. Doctoral Research and Dissertation. 3 Credits.