Media and Journalism Major, B.A.

School of Media and Journalism

www.mj.unc.edu

Carroll Hall, CB# 3365

(919) 962-1204

Susan King, Dean

Charlie Tuggle, Senior Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies

catuggle@email.unc.edu

Sharon Jones, Director, Student Services

SHJONES@email.unc.edu

The school prepares men and women for careers in media and journalism by offering an academic program that provides a basic liberal arts education, an understanding of the responsibilities of free press and free speech in a democratic society, and a fundamental knowledge of journalistic and media techniques and substance.

The philosophy that guides the school is that journalists and communicators must understand the political, social, economic, and cultural forces that operate within society. For this reason, students acquire a background in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences while preparing themselves for media and journalism careers.

More than perhaps any other field, journalism requires a strong foundation in word usage, grammar, punctuation, and other writing skills, as well as technical proficiency in the use of computers. Students must score at least 70 percent on the school’s usage and grammar examination as a condition for graduation. The examination is administered several times a semester and during the summer.

Students are responsible for meeting all other graduation requirements. If they have questions about their requirements they should consult an advisor in the school’s Student Records and Registration Office (Carroll Hall) or a senior associate dean. Specific information about graduation requirements, advising, registration, and other procedures is also available on the school’s Web site.

The school cannot guarantee that courses needed to satisfy a student’s degree requirements will be offered during summer school. Students who plan to complete degree requirements in summer school should be aware that low enrollments sometimes force the school to cancel certain courses or sections during either or both summer sessions.

Department Programs

Majors

Minor

Certificate Programs

Graduate Programs

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the media and journalism program, students should be able to:

  • Understand and apply the principles and laws of freedom of speech and press for the country in which the institution that invites ACEJMC is located, as well as receive instruction in and understand the range of systems of freedom of expression around the world, including the right to dissent, to monitor and criticize power, and to assemble and petition for redress of grievances.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the history and role of professionals and institutions in shaping communications.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of gender, race ethnicity, sexual orientation and, as appropriate, other forms of diversity in domestic society in relation to mass communications
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the diversity of peoples and cultures and of the significance and impact of mass communications in a global society.
  • Understand concepts and apply theories in the use and presentation of images and information.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of professional ethical principles and work ethically in pursuit of truth, accuracy, fairness and diversity.
  • Think critically, creatively and independently.
  • Conduct research and evaluate information by methods appropriate to the communications professions in which they work.
  • Write correctly and clearly in forms and styles appropriate for the communications professions, audiences and purposes they serve.
  • Critically evaluate their own work and that of others for accuracy and fairness, clarity, appropriate style and grammatical correctness.
  • Apply basic numerical and statistical concepts.
  • Apply tools and technologies appropriate for the communications professions in which they work.

 Requirements

In addition to the program requirements listed below, students must

  • attain a final cumulative GPA of at least 2.0
  • complete a minimum of 45 academic credit hours earned from UNC–Chapel Hill courses
  • take at least half of their major course requirements (courses and credit hours) at UNC–Chapel Hill
  • earn a minimum of 18 hours of C or better in the major core requirements (some majors require 21 hours).

For more information, please consult the degree requirements section of the catalog.

Requirements Outside the School

Government/Politics
Select one from the following list:3
State and Local Government in the United States H
Introduction to Comparative Politics H
International Relations and World Politics H
The United States Supreme Court
Race, Innocence, and the Decline of the Death Penalty
Outside Concentration
At least three courses in another department or school 19
Total Hours12
H

Honors version available. An honors course fulfills the same requirements as the nonhonors version of that course. Enrollment and GPA restrictions may apply.

1

 Students are expected to gain a depth of knowledge of a topic outside the school. Completing another major or minor would fulfill this requirement.

Students who wish to complete a second major outside the school and who did not declare the second major before being admitted to the school must download a second-major declaration form from the school’s Web site and return it to Student Records and Registration in Carroll Hall for approval. They must then meet with an academic advisor in the College of Arts and Sciences to ensure that they can meet all requirements for the second major.

Requirements in Both Study Areas

The degree earned is the bachelor of arts with a major in media and journalism. Two areas of study are offered: a concentration in advertising/public relations and a concentration in journalism. Areas of study are not noted on the diploma. Some courses are required for all majors in the school, and each area of study has specific course requirements.

Students who enter the University in fall 2013 or later must complete a minimum of 39 credits up to a maximum of 48 credits in media and journalism with a grade point average of 2.0 or better. A grade of D in a MEJO core course will not be counted in the minimum number of media and journalism credits required for graduation; the course must be retaken if it is required for the major. If the course is not specifically required, then another course that meets the requirement the first course was meeting may be taken in its stead. MEJO 393 cannot be counted in the minimum of 39 credit hours required, but will count in the 48 credit hours allowed in media and journalism for graduation and in the total 120-credit hours required by the University. The school will normally accept only six credit hours of media and journalism courses taken at other institutions and requires students to pass exemption examinations to receive credit for certain basic courses. The school typically does not accept transfer credit for MEJO 153.

Of the basic 120 hours for graduation at least 72 hours must be outside media and journalism. Please check the course list below or ConnectCarolina for prerequisite information for MEJO courses.

Students must achieve a passing score of at least 70 on the school’s usage and grammar examination.

Media and Journalism Major, B.A.–Journalism

School Core
MEJO 121Introduction to Digital Storytelling 13
MEJO 141Media Ethics3
MEJO 153Writing and Reporting 13
MEJO 340Introduction to Media Law: Journalism Focus (MEJO 153 is a prerequisite)3
Concentration
At least two courses from Level 16
Sports Xtra
News Editing
Foundations of Photojournalism
Foundations of Graphic Design
Foundations of Interactive Media
Audio Journalism
Introduction to Public Affairs Reporting
At least two courses from Level 26
Feature Writing
Opinion Writing
Special Skills in Mass Communication
Television News Reporting and Producing
Producing Radio
Creative Sportswriting
Community Journalism
News Lab: Creating Tomorrow's News Products
Media Design
Information Graphics
Publication Design
Intermediate Interactive Media
Multimedia Storytelling: Carolina Photojournalism Workshop
Photojournalism, Lighting, and Business Techniques
At least two courses from Level 36
Producing Television News
Broadcast News and Production Management
Economics Reporting
Business Reporting
Business and the Media
Advanced Reporting
Advanced Editing
Environmental and Science Journalism
Environmental and Science Video Storytelling
Environmental and Science Documentary Television
Environmental Storytelling
Data Driven Journalism
Photo Stories
Advanced Documentary Video Storytelling
Advanced Interactive Media
International Projects
3D Design Studio
Motion Graphics
Conceptual Courses
Students must also complete two courses from the following list:6
Current Issues in Mass Communication
From Gutenberg to Google: A History of Media
Talk Politics: An Introduction to Political Communication
Sports and the Media (1 credit course)
The Black Press and United States History
Introduction to Internet Issues and Concepts
Media Management and Policy
Voice and Diction
Diversity and Communication
Gender, Class, Race, and Mass Media
Latino Media Studies
Process and Effects of Mass Communication
Global Communication and Comparative Journalism
International Media Studies
Freedom of Expression in the United States
Southern Politics: Critical Thinking and Writing
Health Communication
Concepts of Marketing
Ethical Issues and Sports Communication
New Media Technologies: Their Impact on the Future of Advertising, Marketing, and Public Relations
Market Intelligence
Special Topics in Mass Communication (when appropriate topic) H
Digital Media Economics and Behavior
Leadership in a Time of Change
The Branding of Me
Emerging Technologies
Individual Study
Introductory Honors Course
Honors Essay
Captone
Select one course from the following:3
Media Hub
Magazine Writing and Editing
Photojournalism Projects
Magazine Design
Total Hours39
H

Honors version available. An honors course fulfills the same requirements as the nonhonors version of that course. Enrollment and GPA restrictions may apply.

1

It is recommended that students take MEJO 153 and MEJO 121 together.

Media and Journalism Major, B.A.–Advertising/Public Relations Curriculum

The advertising/public relations curriculum is for students who wish to communicate on behalf of organizations, including corporations, government agencies, nonprofit and advocacy groups, and public relations and advertising agencies. Students learn to develop persuasive advertising messages or focus on strategic communication efforts for an organization. Both are pursued within an ethical framework of communication.

School Core
MEJO 121Introduction to Digital Storytelling 13
MEJO 141Media Ethics3
MEJO 153Writing and Reporting 13
MEJO 341Introduction to Media Law: Advertising, Public Relations, and Strategic Communication Focus3
Concentration
One course from Level 13
Principles of Advertising and Public Relations
At least three courses from Level 29
Public Relations Writing
Video Communication for Public Relations and Marketing
Presentation Design for Strategic Communication
Advertising Creative
Advertising Media
Sports Marketing and Advertising
Sports Communication
Advertising and Public Relations Research
Special Skills in Mass Communication
At least two courses from Level 36
Public Information Strategies
Concepts of Marketing
New Media Technologies: Their Impact on the Future of Advertising, Marketing, and Public Relations
Market Intelligence
Special Topics in Mass Communication H
Case Studies in Public Relations
Crisis Communication
Art Direction in Advertising
The Branding of Me
Conceptual (at least two courses) 26
Current Issues in Mass Communication
From Gutenberg to Google: A History of Media
Talk Politics: An Introduction to Political Communication
Sports and the Media (1 credit course)
The Black Press and United States History
Introduction to Internet Issues and Concepts
Media Management and Policy
Voice and Diction
Diversity and Communication
Gender, Class, Race, and Mass Media
Latino Media Studies
Process and Effects of Mass Communication
Global Communication and Comparative Journalism
International Media Studies
Freedom of Expression in the United States
Southern Politics: Critical Thinking and Writing
Health Communication
Ethical Issues and Sports Communication
Special Topics in Mass Communication H
Digital Media Economics and Behavior
Leadership in a Time of Change
Emerging Technologies
Individual Study
Introductory Honors Course
Honors Essay
Capstone
At least one course 3
Public Relations Campaigns
Workroom FashionMash Experiential Design
Workroom FashionMash Product Design
Digital Advertising and Marketing
Social Marketing Campaigns
Advertising Campaigns
Special Topics in Advertising
Total Hours39
H

Honors version available. An honors course fulfills the same requirements as the nonhonors version of that course. Enrollment and GPA restrictions may apply.

1

It is recommended that students take MEJO 153 and MEJO 121 together.

2

 Not all of the courses may be offered every semester.

Special Opportunities in Media and Journalism

Honors in Media and Journalism

An honors program is available to students who have demonstrated their ability to perform distinguished work. Invitation to the senior-level honors courses (MEJO 691H and MEJO 692H) is based upon a grade point average of 3.5 or better in the major and 3.3 overall, recommendation by a faculty member in the school, and approval by the director of the honors program. Students successfully completing the program graduate with honors or with highest honors.

Student Involvement

Students are encouraged to work on campus publications and programs such as The Daily Tar Heel, Black Ink, Blue & White, The Siren, Synapse, and the Her Campus Web site, among others. The school also offers a number of opportunities to gain professional experience including "Carolina Week," "Carolina Connection," "Sports Xtra," The Durham VOICE, Reese News Lab, and Heelprint Communications. Students are also encouraged to join appropriate professional organizations, including campus chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists, American Advertising Federation, Public Relations Student Society of America, Carolina Association of Black Journalists (affiliated with the National Association of Black Journalists), Electronic News Association of the Carolinas, Society for News Design, National Press Photographers Association, Carolina Association of Future Magazine Editors, and SABEW.

Internships

The school strongly encourages students to obtain internships because they provide invaluable professional experience. Reporting, advertising, photo and video journalism, graphic design, broadcast news, public relations, business, and other internships are possible. Majors can enroll in MEJO 393 to receive internship credit (one credit hour, repeatable three times). MEJO 393 fulfills the experiential education General Education requirement. The school’s career services director oversees internship credit. MEJO 393 cannot be counted in the minimum of 39 credit hours required by the school, but it will count in the maximum of 48 credit hours allowed in media and journalism for graduation and in the total 120–credit hours required by the University. MEJO 153 is a prerequisite.

Study Abroad

Students are encouraged to study abroad. In addition to the programs available to all students through the UNC Study Abroad Office, the school has its own study abroad exchanges with top media and journalism schools in Australia, Argentina, Chile, France, Hong Kong, London, and Spain. Students should consult with the school’s study abroad advisor (located in Carroll Hall) to determine any media and journalism course credit prior to the study abroad term.

Undergraduate Scholarships

Many special scholarships are available to media and journalism majors and to students transferring into the school. For information, see the school’s Web site or write the senior associate dean of the school by December 1 for the following academic year.

Undergraduate Research

Undergraduates participate in research through a research pool that assists faculty members in their research and creative activities, through independent studies with faculty members to work on specific projects, and through the school’s honors program, which engages the student in substantive research that culminates in a thesis in the senior year.