Comparative Literature Major, B.A.

Department of English and Comparative Literature

http://englishcomplit.unc.edu

Greenlaw Hall, CB# 3520

(919) 962-5481

Dr. Jessica Wolfe

wolfej@unc.edu

Dr. Hilary Lithgow, Lecturer-Advisor

lithgow@email.unc.edu

To major in comparative literature is to explore major works of literature, film, and theory from across the world, crossing disciplinary as well as national, cultural, and linguistic boundaries. Majoring in comparative literature enables students to acquire a broad, liberal arts-based education and equips them to live, work, and communicate in a multicultural world.

Department Programs

Majors

Minors

Graduate Programs

Requirements

Concentrations:

Comparative Literature Major, B.A.–International Literature Track

In addition to the program requirements listed below, students must

  • attain a final cumulative GPA of at least 2.0
  • complete a minimum of 45 academic credit hours earned from UNC-Chapel Hill courses
  • take at least half of their major course requirements (courses and credit hours) at UNC-Chapel Hill
  • earn a minimum of 18 hours of C or better in the major core requirements (some majors require 21 hours).

For more information, please consult the degree requirements section of the catalog.

Core Requirements
One course from Great Books I (CMPL courses numbered between 120 and 129)3
One course from Great Books II (CMPL courses numbered between 130 and 142)3
CMPL 250Approaches to Comparative Literature H3
or CMPL 251 Introduction to Literary Theory
Four CMPL courses 200 level or higher12
CMPL 500Advanced Seminar3
Two literature courses (200 level or higher) taught in a foreign/classical language, chosen from the following lists. (We recommend that these courses be in the same language.)6
Additional Requirements
Foreign language through level 4 13
Total Hours33
H

Honors version available. An honors course fulfills the same requirements as the nonhonors version of that course. Enrollment and GPA restrictions may apply.

1

 Foreign language levels 1-3 fulfill the General Education Foundations requirements.

Literature Courses Taught in a Foreign/Classical Language

Language Options Include:

Arabic

ARAB 305Advanced Arabic I3
ARAB 306Advanced Arabic II3
ARAB 308Arabic Languages across the Curriculum Recitation1
ARAB 407Readings in Arabic I3
ARAB 408Readings in Arabic II3
ARAB 496Independent Readings in Arabic1-3
ARAB 681Readings in Islamicate Literatures3
Chinese
CHIN 306Advanced Chinese II3
CHIN 313Advanced Written Chinese3
CHIN 407Readings in Modern Chinese I3
CHIN 408Readings in Modern Chinese II3
CHIN 414Advanced Reading and Composition3
CHIN 442Modern Chinese Society3
CHIN 490Topics in Chinese Literature and Language3
CHIN 496Independent Readings in Chinese1-3
CHIN 510Introduction to Classical Chinese3
CHIN 511Literary Chinese3
CHIN 525Ancient Philosophers and Their Modern Reincarnation3
CHIN 532Modernizing the Chinese Language3
CHIN 590Advanced Topics in Chinese Literature and Language3
French
FREN 260Literature and the French-Speaking World H3
FREN 312French University Methodology through Literature3
FREN 315Imposteur!: Faking and False Identities in French and Francophone Drama and Film3
FREN 325Crime and Literature in French and Francophone Contexts3
FREN 332HCultural Diversity in Francophone Cinema3
FREN 370Survey of French Literature I3
FREN 371Survey of French Literature II3
FREN 372Survey of French Literature III3
FREN 375Francophone Literature and Film3
FREN 376Identity and Nationhood in Québécois Literature3
FREN 380Francophone Drama and Multimedia Productions3
FREN 381Francophone Poetry and Slam3
FREN 382Visual Francophone Studies3
FREN 387Paris/Versailles: The Court and the City in the 17th Century3
FREN 390Special Topics in French and Francophone Studies3
FREN 504Cultural Wars: French/United States Perspectives3
FREN 505African Francophone Cinema3
FREN 51320th- and 21st-Century French Literature and Culture3
FREN 515Social Networks: Technology and Community in Modern France3
FREN 522French Middle Ages3
FREN 530Postmodernisms3
FREN 555Crossing Gazes: Multidirectional and Conflicting Memories of Algeria3
FREN 561French Renaissance Literature and Culture3
FREN 57520th- and 21st-Century Francophone Literature and the Visual Arts3
FREN 576Francophone Cultural Studies3
FREN 58318th-Century French Literature and Culture3
FREN 585Libertinism and Sexuality3
FREN 590Special Topics in French and Francophone Studies3
FREN 611French Novelists of the 20th Century3
FREN 617Framing Identities: Franco-Arab Transvisual Transcultural Contexts3
FREN 662Poetry of the French Renaissance3
FREN 67017th-Century French Literature and Culture3
FREN 675Literature and Enlightenment, 17th -18th Centuries3
FREN 687Diaspora and Transculturalism in Québécois Literature3
H

Honors version available. An honors course fulfills the same requirements as the nonhonors version of that course. Enrollment and GPA restrictions may apply.

German
GERM 303Introduction to German Literature3
GERM 325Fools and Laughter in Early Modern German Literature3
GERM 330The Age of Goethe3
GERM 349Die Jahrhundertwende3
GERM 350Modern German Literature3
GERM 370Readings in German Intellectual History3
GERM 371The German Novella3
GERM 372German Drama3
GERM 373Denk ich an Deutschland. . .": German Lyrical Poetry through the Centuries3
GERM 374German Theater: Words Speak as Loudly as Actions3
GERM 380Austrian Literature3
GERM 381Berlin: Mapping a (Post) Modern Metropolis3
GERM 382Representations of Violence and Terrorism in Contemporary German Literature and Film3
GERM 383Adaptations of the Past: Literature of the German Democratic Republic3
GERM 502Middle High German3
Greek
GREK 205Greek New Testament3
GREK 221Advanced Greek I3
GREK 222Advanced Greek II3
GREK 351Classical Greek Prose3
GREK 352Greek Poetry3
GREK 396Special Readings in Greek Literature3
GREK 409Greek New Testament3
GREK 508Readings in Early Greek Poetry3
GREK 509Readings in Greek Literature of the Fifth Century3
GREK 510Readings in Greek Literature of the Fourth Century3
GREK 540Problems in the History of Classical Ideas3
GREK 541Problems in the History of Classical Ideas3
Italian
ITAL 333Italian Film and Culture3
ITAL 335Themes in Italian Film3
ITAL 343Italian Culture Today: Modern Italy as a Nation 1860 to Present3
ITAL 345Italian Women Writers3
ITAL 370Survey of Italian Literature I3
ITAL 371Survey of Italian Literature II3
ITAL 382The Modern Italian Novel3
ITAL 398Undergraduate Seminar in Italian3
ITAL 511Survey of Italian Literature and Culture I (to 1600)3
ITAL 512Survey of Italian Literature and Culture II (1600 to present)3
Japanese
JAPN 305Advanced Japanese3
JAPN 306Advanced Japanese II3
JAPN 408Japanese Journalism3
JAPN 409Japanese Modernism3
JAPN 410Topics in Contemporary Japanese Literature3
JAPN 411Food and Culture in Japan3
JAPN 412Making Music in Japan3
JAPN 451Swords, Tea Bowls, and Woodblock Prints: Exploring Japanese Material Culture3
JAPN 482Embodying Japan: The Cultures of Beauty, Sports, and Medicine in Japan3
Latin
LATN 205Medieval Latin3
LATN 221Vergil3
LATN 222Cicero: The Man and His Times3
LATN 223Ovid3
LATN 331Roman Historians3
LATN 332Roman Comedy3
LATN 333Lyric Poetry3
LATN 334Augustan Poetry3
LATN 335Roman Elegy3
LATN 351Lucretius3
LATN 352Petronius and the Age of Nero3
LATN 353Satire (Horace and Juvenal)3
LATN 354Tacitus and Pliny's Letters3
LATN 396Special Readings in Latin Literature3
LATN 511Readings in Latin Literature of the Republic3
LATN 512Readings in Latin Literature of the Augustan Age3
LATN 513Readings in Latin Literature of the Empire3
LATN 514Readings in Latin Literature of Later Antiquity3
LATN 530An Introduction to Medieval Latin3
LATN 540Problems in the History of Classical Ideas3
LATN 541Problems in the History of Classical Ideas3
Portuguese
PORT 385Lusophone Africa in Literature: Discovery to the Present3
PORT 387Brazilian Religious Movements through Film and Literature3
PORT 501Survey of Portuguese Literature I3
PORT 502Survey of Portuguese Literature II3
PORT 503Survey of Brazilian Literature I3
PORT 504Survey of Brazilian Literature II3
PORT 535Brazilian Drama3
Russian
RUSS 250Introduction to Russian Literature3
RUSS 450The Russian Absurd: Text, Stage, Screen3
RUSS 460Russian Short Story3
RUSS 463Russian Drama: From Classicism to Modernism3
RUSS 464Dostoevsky3
RUSS 465Chekhov3
RUSS 471Gogol3
RUSS 477Vladimir Nabokov: Life and Art3
RUSS 479Tolstoy3
Spanish
SPAN 260Introduction to Spanish and Spanish American Literature H3
SPAN 262Introduction to Spanish and Spanish American Literature for Heritage Learners3
SPAN 371Studies in Spanish Literature3
SPAN 373Studies in Latin American Literature3
SPAN 379Aesthetics of Violence in Latina/o American Fiction3
SPAN 380Studies in Spanish Drama3
SPAN 381Studies in Spanish and Spanish American Poetry3
SPAN 382Studies in Spanish Prose3
SPAN 383Medieval Spanish Literature3
SPAN 384Spanish Renaissance3
SPAN 385Contemporary Spanish American Prose Fiction3
SPAN 386Literature and Politics in Central America3
SPAN 387Eroticism in Contemporary Latin American Literature3
SPAN 388Narratives of the Mexican Revolution3
SPAN 389Outside Cuba: Diasporic Literature and Culture3
SPAN 398Undergraduate Seminar in Literature and Culture3
SPAN 613Colonial and 19th-Century Spanish American Literature3
SPAN 614Modernist and Contemporary Spanish American Literature3
SPAN 617Cervantes and the Quijote3
SPAN 620Women in Hispanic Literature3
SPAN 625Indigenous Literatures and Cultures of the Américas3
SPAN 630Literature and the Visual Arts in Spain3
SPAN 650The Spanish Comedia of the Golden Age3
H

Honors version available. An honors course fulfills the same requirements as the nonhonors version of that course. Enrollment and GPA restrictions may apply.

Students wishing to count literature courses not listed above toward the major are encouraged to consult the director of undergraduate studies.

Comparative Literature Major, B.A.–Global Cinema Studies Track

In addition to the program requirements listed below, students must

  • attain a final cumulative GPA of at least 2.0
  • complete a minimum of 45 academic credit hours earned from UNC-Chapel Hill courses
  • take at least half of their major course requirements (courses and credit hours) at UNC-Chapel Hill
  • earn a minimum of 18 hours of C or better in the major core requirements (some majors require 21 hours).

For more information, please consult the degree requirements section of the catalog.

Core Requirements
One course from Great Books I (CMPL courses numbered between 120 and 129)3
CMPL 142Visual Culture II3
CMPL 143History of Global Cinema3
One of the following:3
Introduction to Film Theory
Approaches to Comparative Literature H
Introduction to Literary Theory
CMPL 500Advanced Seminar3
ENGL 142Film Analysis H3
Four courses in film, 200 level or higher, chosen from the list below.12
Additional Requirements
Foreign language through level 4 13
Total Hours33
H

Honors version available. An honors course fulfills the same requirements as the nonhonors version of that course. Enrollment and GPA restrictions may apply.

1

 Foreign language levels 1-3 fulfill the General Education Foundations requirements.

Courses in Film

AAAD 250The African American in Motion Pictures: 1900 to the Present3
AAAD 396Independent Studies3
AMST 268American Cinema and American Culture3
AMST 336Native Americans in Film3
AMST 483Seeing the USA: Visual Arts and American Culture3
ARAB 453Film, Nation, and Identity in the Arab World3
ASIA 224Introduction to Iranian Cinema3
ASIA 333The Mahabharata: Remembered and Reimagined3
ASIA 435The Cinemas of the Middle East and North Africa3
ASIA/CMPL 255The Feast in Film, Fiction, and Philosophy H3
ASIA/CMPL 379Cowboys, Samurai, and Rebels in Film and Fiction H3
CHIN 464The City in Modern Chinese Literature and Film3
CMPL 254Horror and the Global Gothic: Film, Literature, Theory3
CMPL 257The Crisis of Modernity in World Cinema3
CMPL 280Film Genres3
CMPL 375New Wave Cinema: Its Sources and Its Legacies3
CMPL 382Film and Nature3
CMPL 420Film, Photography, and the Digital Image3
CMPL 463Cinema and Surrealism3
CMPL 494Cinematic Uses of the Essay Form3
CMPL/EURO/FREN 332HCultural Diversity in Francophone Cinema3
COMM 450Media and Popular Culture3
COMM 452Film Noir3
COMM 546History of Film I, 1895 to 19453
COMM 547History of Film II, 1945 to Present3
COMM/WMST 345Women in Film3
ENGL 380Film History H3
ENGL 381Literature and Cinema3
ENGL 389Major Film Directors3
ENGL 410Documentary Film H3
ENGL 580Film--Contemporary Issues H3
ENGL 680Film Theory3
ENGL/WMST 665Queer Latina/o Literature, Performance, and Visual Art3
FREN 373French New Wave Cinema3
GERM 265Hitler in Hollywood: Cinematic Representations of Nazi Germany3
GERM 275History of German Cinema3
GERM/WMST 250Women in German Cinema3
HUNG 280Hungarian Cinema since World War II3
HUNG 411Introduction to Hungarian Literature3
ITAL 333Italian Film and Culture3
ITAL 335Themes in Italian Film3
ITAL 340Italian America in Literature and Film3
PLSH 280The Modern Cinema of Poland3
PORT 388Portuguese, Brazilian, and African Identity in Film3
SLAV 281Holocaust Cinema in Eastern Europe3
SPAN 361Hispanic Film3
SPAN 388Narratives of the Mexican Revolution3
WMST 285African American Women in the Media3
H

Honors version available. An honors course fulfills the same requirements as the nonhonors version of that course. Enrollment and GPA restrictions may apply.

Additional Information for Both Comparative Literature Concentrations

Students may choose comparative literature as a second major, a particularly attractive option for those majoring in a foreign language because up to four of the foreign language major requirements can also count toward the 10-course major requirement in comparative literature.

Undergraduates majoring in comparative literature may minor in any department, curriculum, or school in which a minor is offered.

Majors should expect to work closely with the undergraduate advisor to design and follow a coherent, cohesive plan of study. Students who study abroad can generally apply their literature credits towards the major. Students completing the global cinema studies track may not complete a minor in global cinema studies.

All majors, regardless of their chosen track, must obtain at least a level 4 proficiency in a foreign language relevant to their individual area of interest. We strongly recommend that students in the global cinema studies track study as many film courses in the original languages as possible.

Sophomores planning to major in comparative literature should take one course under the Great Books I rubric, which treats ancient and premodern literatures, and one course under the Great Books II rubric, which treats literature from 1750 to the present. One of these courses can be used to fulfill the General Education literary arts Approaches requirement.

Special Opportunities in English and Comparative Literature

Honors in Comparative Literature

Majors with an overall 3.3 grade point average may elect to write an honors thesis by applying for permission to the director of undergraduate studies in the spring semester of their junior year. Students then register for CMPL 691H and CMPL 692H during their senior year. These courses may count as credit towards completion of the major. Students write the 50- to 70-page thesis on a comparative topic under the direction of any faculty member. The student conducts independent research during the summer between junior and senior years, often with the assistance of research funding. The first semester of the senior year involves regular tutorial sessions with the faculty advisor, as well as the completion of most of the writing of the thesis. In the spring students finish the process of writing and defend the completed thesis at an oral examination. For more information about the honors thesis in comparative literature, including examples of past thesis topics, please visit the English and Comparative Literature Honors Thesis Web site.

Honors in Creative Writing

See “Creative Writing Minor."

Honors in English

The Department offers at least two English honors seminars each semester. In addition, students seeking a degree with honors in English (a 3.3 cumulative grade point average and a 3.6 grade point average in major courses required) undertake a yearlong independent project during their senior year (ENGL 691H and ENGL 692H) and usually produce a 40- to 50-page thesis. Students pursuing a degree with honors normally meet every week with the professors supervising their projects. This opportunity for individually directed research and writing often proves to be a high point of the student’s academic career.

Study Abroad

Some of the best programs offered at the University for study overseas are especially appropriate and useful to majors in the Department of English and Comparative Literature. These include semester or yearlong programs at Bristol, Manchester, Sussex, Edinburgh, Glasgow, and certain Australian universities. Students who have a minimum grade point average of 3.3 at the end of their sophomore year can participate in the King’s College Exchange Program at King’s College, London (representing either English or comparative literature). Special opportunities are also available at Oxford University and through the Joint Degree Program with the National University of Singapore. Comparative literature students most frequently travel to non-English-speaking destinations. For information on all overseas programs, see the Study Abroad Office or visit their Web site.